Best (configurations of) practices and how do they contribute to high performance?

Bjørge Timenes Laugen, Harry Boer, Nuran Acur

    Research output: Contribution to book/anthology/report/conference proceedingArticle in proceedingResearchpeer-review

    Abstract

    Much literature exists about best practices and there are many contributions on how to achieve high operational performance. However, there is a lack of theory on the relationships between practices and performance(s). Furthermore, the implementation process of action programmes and especially the effects that process may have on the success of the action programmes is often not considered. This paper focuses on the latter and reports the results of an exploratory case study of a plant, which is part of a large high performance manufacturing company in Denmark. The plant is in the process of implementing a range of action programmes, including TPM, 6 sigma, SMED and CFM to support its ambition to become lean. While these programmes clearly reinforce each other, the plant experiences negative performance effects. In the paper, we propose a range of factors explaining this. We conclude the paper with directions for further research.
    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationProceedings of the 12th Annual International EurOMA Conference on Operations and Global Competitiveness
    EditorsKrisztina Demeter
    Number of pages9
    PublisherEurOMA
    Publication date2005
    ISBN (Print)9632184556
    Publication statusPublished - 2005
    Event12th Annual International EurOMA Conference on Operations and Global Competitiveness - Budapest, Hungary
    Duration: 19 Jun 200522 Jun 2005
    Conference number: 12

    Conference

    Conference12th Annual International EurOMA Conference on Operations and Global Competitiveness
    Number12
    CountryHungary
    CityBudapest
    Period19/06/200522/06/2005

    Keywords

    • Best practice
    • Implementation
    • Case study

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