Cassius Dio on Perusia: A Study in Human Nature During Civil War

Research output: Contribution to book/anthology/report/conference proceedingArticle in proceedingResearchpeer-review

Abstract

From Thucydides to Kalyvas, civil war is associated with wickedness and personal animosities. This contribution seeks to view the violence of the Late Republican civil war through the lens applied to it by Cassius Dio. It focusses on Dio’s portrayal of the use of violence by Young Caesar upon the fall of Perusia early in 40 BCE—allegedly followed by the killing of three hundred Senators and equites as well as the Perusine citizens. Violence was not only a conspicuous part of civil war, but also had a distinct purpose—viz. the elimination of personal enemies and the confirmation of power. This use of indiscriminate as opposed to selective violence speaks volumes about the balance of power in Italy: Young Caesar was not in total control in 41-40 BCE. Dio did not wholeheartedly commit to the story of the three hundred, but he still mentions it: clearly this concerns not only Dio’s wish to understand human nature and the leading civil war protagonists; it concerns also the impact of civil war, and the historian’s approach to it through narrative.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationIn Jesper M. Madsen & C.H. Lange (eds.) Cassius Dio the Historian: Methods and Approaches
Place of PublicationLeiden and Boston
PublisherBrill
Publication date2019
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2019
EventCassius Dio the Historian: Methods and Approaches/Call for papers - SDU, Odense , Denmark
Duration: 7 Dec 20169 Dec 2016

Conference

ConferenceCassius Dio the Historian: Methods and Approaches/Call for papers
LocationSDU
CountryDenmark
CityOdense
Period07/12/201609/12/2016
SeriesHistoriography of Rome and Its Empire

Fingerprint

Civil War
Human Nature
Cassius Dio
Enemy
Republican
Portrayal
Balance of Power
Protagonist
Historian
Thucydides
Wishes
Italy
Killing

Cite this

Lange, C. H. (Accepted/In press). Cassius Dio on Perusia: A Study in Human Nature During Civil War. In In Jesper M. Madsen & C.H. Lange (eds.) Cassius Dio the Historian: Methods and Approaches Leiden and Boston: Brill. Historiography of Rome and Its Empire
Lange, Carsten Hjort. / Cassius Dio on Perusia: A Study in Human Nature During Civil War. In Jesper M. Madsen & C.H. Lange (eds.) Cassius Dio the Historian: Methods and Approaches. Leiden and Boston : Brill, 2019. (Historiography of Rome and Its Empire).
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abstract = "From Thucydides to Kalyvas, civil war is associated with wickedness and personal animosities. This contribution seeks to view the violence of the Late Republican civil war through the lens applied to it by Cassius Dio. It focusses on Dio’s portrayal of the use of violence by Young Caesar upon the fall of Perusia early in 40 BCE—allegedly followed by the killing of three hundred Senators and equites as well as the Perusine citizens. Violence was not only a conspicuous part of civil war, but also had a distinct purpose—viz. the elimination of personal enemies and the confirmation of power. This use of indiscriminate as opposed to selective violence speaks volumes about the balance of power in Italy: Young Caesar was not in total control in 41-40 BCE. Dio did not wholeheartedly commit to the story of the three hundred, but he still mentions it: clearly this concerns not only Dio’s wish to understand human nature and the leading civil war protagonists; it concerns also the impact of civil war, and the historian’s approach to it through narrative.",
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Lange, CH 2019, Cassius Dio on Perusia: A Study in Human Nature During Civil War. in In Jesper M. Madsen & C.H. Lange (eds.) Cassius Dio the Historian: Methods and Approaches. Brill, Leiden and Boston, Historiography of Rome and Its Empire, Odense , Denmark, 07/12/2016.

Cassius Dio on Perusia: A Study in Human Nature During Civil War. / Lange, Carsten Hjort.

In Jesper M. Madsen & C.H. Lange (eds.) Cassius Dio the Historian: Methods and Approaches. Leiden and Boston : Brill, 2019.

Research output: Contribution to book/anthology/report/conference proceedingArticle in proceedingResearchpeer-review

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AB - From Thucydides to Kalyvas, civil war is associated with wickedness and personal animosities. This contribution seeks to view the violence of the Late Republican civil war through the lens applied to it by Cassius Dio. It focusses on Dio’s portrayal of the use of violence by Young Caesar upon the fall of Perusia early in 40 BCE—allegedly followed by the killing of three hundred Senators and equites as well as the Perusine citizens. Violence was not only a conspicuous part of civil war, but also had a distinct purpose—viz. the elimination of personal enemies and the confirmation of power. This use of indiscriminate as opposed to selective violence speaks volumes about the balance of power in Italy: Young Caesar was not in total control in 41-40 BCE. Dio did not wholeheartedly commit to the story of the three hundred, but he still mentions it: clearly this concerns not only Dio’s wish to understand human nature and the leading civil war protagonists; it concerns also the impact of civil war, and the historian’s approach to it through narrative.

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Lange CH. Cassius Dio on Perusia: A Study in Human Nature During Civil War. In In Jesper M. Madsen & C.H. Lange (eds.) Cassius Dio the Historian: Methods and Approaches. Leiden and Boston: Brill. 2019. (Historiography of Rome and Its Empire).