Cellular semiotics and signal transduction

    Research output: Contribution to book/anthology/report/conference proceedingBook chapterResearch

    25 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Semiosis, the processes of production, communication and interpretation of signs - coding and de-coding - takes place within and between organisms. The term "endosemiosis" refers to the processes of interpretation and sign transmission inside an organism (as opposed to "exosemiosis", which refers to the processes of sign interpretation and transmission between organisms of the same or different species). In Biosemiotics it is customary to recognise the cell as the most elementary integration unit for semiosis. Therefore intra and intercellular communication constitute the departure point for the study of endosemiotics.

    In contemporary molecular and cell biology, signal transduction research has remarkably contributed to a major paradigm shift in biology in which biology is now seen as a "science of sensing". Once we recognise that sensing is one of the necessary properties of life, we cannot do without considering semiotic logic in order to construct our understanding of living phenomena. Given the central integrating role of signal transduction in physiological and ecological studies, this chapter outlines its semiotic implications.

    The multi-modality and modularity of signal molecules and relative "infrastructure" components poses one of the central problems for understanding metabolic codes: the occurrence of different instances of "cross-talk", "redundancy" and "categorial sensing" at different hierarchical levels. The term "categorial sensing" captures very well the essence of the "outstanding question(s)" in signal transduction; i.e.: how specificity is determined, how ubiquitous signals or messengers convey specific information, how undesired cross-talk is avoided, how redundancy integrates the system. This chapter proposes a basic conceptual toolbox for interpreting empirical data that deals with such puzzling phenomena from a biosemiotic perspective.

    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationIntroduction to Biosemiotics : The New Biological Synthesis
    EditorsMarcello Barbieri
    Number of pages44
    Place of PublicationBerlin / Heidelberg
    PublisherSpringer
    Publication date2007
    Pages365-408
    ISBN (Print)978-1-4020-4813-5
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2007

    Fingerprint

    Transduction
    Organism
    Redundancy
    Semiosis
    Communication
    Biosemiotics
    Cells
    Departure
    Specificity
    Logic
    Molecules
    Paradigm Shift
    Essence
    Multimodality
    Modularity
    Empirical Data

    Keywords

    • cellular semiotics
    • signal transduction
    • cross talk
    • ubiquitous signals
    • sign-processes
    • categorial sensing
    • digital-analogical consensus
    • specificity
    • systems of correspondences
    • emergent interpretant
    • triadic logic
    • biological information
    • context
    • hierarchy

    Cite this

    Bruni, L. E. (2007). Cellular semiotics and signal transduction. In M. Barbieri (Ed.), Introduction to Biosemiotics: The New Biological Synthesis (pp. 365-408). Berlin / Heidelberg: Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/1-4020-4814-9_15
    Bruni, Luis Emilio. / Cellular semiotics and signal transduction. Introduction to Biosemiotics: The New Biological Synthesis. editor / Marcello Barbieri. Berlin / Heidelberg : Springer, 2007. pp. 365-408
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    Bruni, LE 2007, Cellular semiotics and signal transduction. in M Barbieri (ed.), Introduction to Biosemiotics: The New Biological Synthesis. Springer, Berlin / Heidelberg, pp. 365-408. https://doi.org/10.1007/1-4020-4814-9_15

    Cellular semiotics and signal transduction. / Bruni, Luis Emilio.

    Introduction to Biosemiotics: The New Biological Synthesis. ed. / Marcello Barbieri. Berlin / Heidelberg : Springer, 2007. p. 365-408.

    Research output: Contribution to book/anthology/report/conference proceedingBook chapterResearch

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    Bruni LE. Cellular semiotics and signal transduction. In Barbieri M, editor, Introduction to Biosemiotics: The New Biological Synthesis. Berlin / Heidelberg: Springer. 2007. p. 365-408 https://doi.org/10.1007/1-4020-4814-9_15