Corticomotor excitability reduction induced by experimental pain remains unaffected by performing a working memory task as compared to staying at rest

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Abstract

Experimental pain inhibits primary motor cortex (M1) excitability. Attenuating pain-related inhibition of M1 excitability may be useful during rehabilitation in individuals with pain. One strategy to attenuate M1 excitability is to influence prefrontal and premotor cortex activity. Working memory tasks, e.g. the two-back task (TBT), engage prefrontal and premotor cortices and may influence M1 excitability. We hypothesized that performing the TBT during pain would influence pain-related changes in M1 excitability. Participants (n = 28) received rigorous training in the TBT before baseline testing. Experimental pain was induced by injecting hypertonic saline into the first dorsal interosseous (FDI) muscle. Participants rated pain intensity on a 0-10 numerical rating scale (NRS) every second min until pain-resolved (PR) during the performance of the TBT (n = 14) or during REST (n = 14). In the TBT, letters were presented pseudo-randomly, and accuracy and reaction time to identified letters corresponding to letters shown two times back were recorded. M1 excitability was assessed using transcranial magnetic stimulation. Motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) were recorded at baseline, and at PR, PR + 10, PR + 20, and PR + 30 min. Four minutes after hypertonic saline injection, the pain NRS scores were higher in the TBT group than the REST group (p = 0.009). No time × group interaction was found for MEPs (p = 0.73), but a main effect of time (p < 0.0005) revealed a reduction of MEPs at PR up until PR + 30 (p < 0.008). The TBT accuracy improved at PR + 30 in both groups (p = 0.019). In conclusion, the pain-induced reduction in corticomotor excitability was unaffected by performing a working memory task, despite greater pain in the TBT group.

Original languageEnglish
JournalExperimental Brain Research
ISSN0014-4819
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 19 Jun 2019

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Short-Term Memory
Pain
Motor Evoked Potentials
Motor Cortex
Prefrontal Cortex
Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation
Reaction Time

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@article{f28ea67b68b540b7b55a2eb4b006be0d,
title = "Corticomotor excitability reduction induced by experimental pain remains unaffected by performing a working memory task as compared to staying at rest",
abstract = "Experimental pain inhibits primary motor cortex (M1) excitability. Attenuating pain-related inhibition of M1 excitability may be useful during rehabilitation in individuals with pain. One strategy to attenuate M1 excitability is to influence prefrontal and premotor cortex activity. Working memory tasks, e.g. the two-back task (TBT), engage prefrontal and premotor cortices and may influence M1 excitability. We hypothesized that performing the TBT during pain would influence pain-related changes in M1 excitability. Participants (n = 28) received rigorous training in the TBT before baseline testing. Experimental pain was induced by injecting hypertonic saline into the first dorsal interosseous (FDI) muscle. Participants rated pain intensity on a 0-10 numerical rating scale (NRS) every second min until pain-resolved (PR) during the performance of the TBT (n = 14) or during REST (n = 14). In the TBT, letters were presented pseudo-randomly, and accuracy and reaction time to identified letters corresponding to letters shown two times back were recorded. M1 excitability was assessed using transcranial magnetic stimulation. Motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) were recorded at baseline, and at PR, PR + 10, PR + 20, and PR + 30 min. Four minutes after hypertonic saline injection, the pain NRS scores were higher in the TBT group than the REST group (p = 0.009). No time × group interaction was found for MEPs (p = 0.73), but a main effect of time (p < 0.0005) revealed a reduction of MEPs at PR up until PR + 30 (p < 0.008). The TBT accuracy improved at PR + 30 in both groups (p = 0.019). In conclusion, the pain-induced reduction in corticomotor excitability was unaffected by performing a working memory task, despite greater pain in the TBT group.",
author = "Larsen, {Dennis B} and Thomas Graven-Nielsen and Hirata, {Rogerio P} and David Seminowicz and Siobhan Schabrun and Boudreau, {Shellie A}",
year = "2019",
month = "6",
day = "19",
doi = "10.1007/s00221-019-05587-y",
language = "English",
journal = "Experimental Brain Research",
issn = "0014-4819",
publisher = "Springer Publishing Company",

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TY - JOUR

T1 - Corticomotor excitability reduction induced by experimental pain remains unaffected by performing a working memory task as compared to staying at rest

AU - Larsen, Dennis B

AU - Graven-Nielsen, Thomas

AU - Hirata, Rogerio P

AU - Seminowicz, David

AU - Schabrun, Siobhan

AU - Boudreau, Shellie A

PY - 2019/6/19

Y1 - 2019/6/19

N2 - Experimental pain inhibits primary motor cortex (M1) excitability. Attenuating pain-related inhibition of M1 excitability may be useful during rehabilitation in individuals with pain. One strategy to attenuate M1 excitability is to influence prefrontal and premotor cortex activity. Working memory tasks, e.g. the two-back task (TBT), engage prefrontal and premotor cortices and may influence M1 excitability. We hypothesized that performing the TBT during pain would influence pain-related changes in M1 excitability. Participants (n = 28) received rigorous training in the TBT before baseline testing. Experimental pain was induced by injecting hypertonic saline into the first dorsal interosseous (FDI) muscle. Participants rated pain intensity on a 0-10 numerical rating scale (NRS) every second min until pain-resolved (PR) during the performance of the TBT (n = 14) or during REST (n = 14). In the TBT, letters were presented pseudo-randomly, and accuracy and reaction time to identified letters corresponding to letters shown two times back were recorded. M1 excitability was assessed using transcranial magnetic stimulation. Motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) were recorded at baseline, and at PR, PR + 10, PR + 20, and PR + 30 min. Four minutes after hypertonic saline injection, the pain NRS scores were higher in the TBT group than the REST group (p = 0.009). No time × group interaction was found for MEPs (p = 0.73), but a main effect of time (p < 0.0005) revealed a reduction of MEPs at PR up until PR + 30 (p < 0.008). The TBT accuracy improved at PR + 30 in both groups (p = 0.019). In conclusion, the pain-induced reduction in corticomotor excitability was unaffected by performing a working memory task, despite greater pain in the TBT group.

AB - Experimental pain inhibits primary motor cortex (M1) excitability. Attenuating pain-related inhibition of M1 excitability may be useful during rehabilitation in individuals with pain. One strategy to attenuate M1 excitability is to influence prefrontal and premotor cortex activity. Working memory tasks, e.g. the two-back task (TBT), engage prefrontal and premotor cortices and may influence M1 excitability. We hypothesized that performing the TBT during pain would influence pain-related changes in M1 excitability. Participants (n = 28) received rigorous training in the TBT before baseline testing. Experimental pain was induced by injecting hypertonic saline into the first dorsal interosseous (FDI) muscle. Participants rated pain intensity on a 0-10 numerical rating scale (NRS) every second min until pain-resolved (PR) during the performance of the TBT (n = 14) or during REST (n = 14). In the TBT, letters were presented pseudo-randomly, and accuracy and reaction time to identified letters corresponding to letters shown two times back were recorded. M1 excitability was assessed using transcranial magnetic stimulation. Motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) were recorded at baseline, and at PR, PR + 10, PR + 20, and PR + 30 min. Four minutes after hypertonic saline injection, the pain NRS scores were higher in the TBT group than the REST group (p = 0.009). No time × group interaction was found for MEPs (p = 0.73), but a main effect of time (p < 0.0005) revealed a reduction of MEPs at PR up until PR + 30 (p < 0.008). The TBT accuracy improved at PR + 30 in both groups (p = 0.019). In conclusion, the pain-induced reduction in corticomotor excitability was unaffected by performing a working memory task, despite greater pain in the TBT group.

U2 - 10.1007/s00221-019-05587-y

DO - 10.1007/s00221-019-05587-y

M3 - Journal article

JO - Experimental Brain Research

JF - Experimental Brain Research

SN - 0014-4819

ER -