Crime and German Decadence: Discussing Todd Herzog’s Crime Stories

    Research output: Working paperResearch

    583 Downloads (Pure)

    Abstract

    In Crime Stories: Criminalistic Fantasy and the Culture of Crisis in Weimar Germany, Todd Herzog – explicitly or implicitly – deals with different established myths about crime fiction, criminality and its cultural presumptions. It is generally quite seldom – as Herzog does – that the three subjects are dealt with collectively and in doing so he establishes new grounds for reflection on crime and culture – both factual and fictional representation as such. Approaches to crime fiction often build on an acknowledged history of the genre which, then, reproduces an established concord of assumptions. In recent years, new and refreshing approaches to crime fiction have emerged where – among others – particularly Maurizio Ascari’s A Counter-History of Crime Fiction (2007), Leonard Cassuto’s Hard-Boiled Sentimentality (2008) and Andrew Nestingen’s Crime and Fantasy in Scandinavia (2008) probe the boundaries of understanding the cultural and historical roots of genre and crime fiction. Nevertheless, the missing link in dealing with crime fiction – even though Nestingen takes certain steps in that direction – is often its connection to criminological and cultural studies. If we approach crime stories in general – both fact and fiction – and the cultural, philosophical and sociological components in the established presumptions of these stories, there seems to be a foundation of a general revision of the understanding and representation of crime and violence. Todd Herzog’s recent book Crime Stories is indeed part of this needed and remarkable wave of theoretical and historical revisions of our understanding of crime through factual and fictional representations.
    Original languageEnglish
    Place of PublicationAalborg
    PublisherAalborg Universitet
    Pages1-8
    Number of pages8
    ISBN (Print)978-87-91695-19-3
    Publication statusPublished - 2010

    Fingerprint

    Crime
    Decadence
    Crime Fiction
    Fiction
    Presumption
    Fantasy
    History
    Concord
    Waves
    Scandinavia
    Weimar Germany
    Criminality
    Genre Fiction
    Sentimentality
    Cultural Studies

    Keywords

    • Crime fiction
    • Society
    • Decadence

    Cite this

    @techreport{9ed6fd602c5b11df937b000ea68e967b,
    title = "Crime and German Decadence: Discussing Todd Herzog’s Crime Stories",
    abstract = "In Crime Stories: Criminalistic Fantasy and the Culture of Crisis in Weimar Germany, Todd Herzog – explicitly or implicitly – deals with different established myths about crime fiction, criminality and its cultural presumptions. It is generally quite seldom – as Herzog does – that the three subjects are dealt with collectively and in doing so he establishes new grounds for reflection on crime and culture – both factual and fictional representation as such. Approaches to crime fiction often build on an acknowledged history of the genre which, then, reproduces an established concord of assumptions. In recent years, new and refreshing approaches to crime fiction have emerged where – among others – particularly Maurizio Ascari’s A Counter-History of Crime Fiction (2007), Leonard Cassuto’s Hard-Boiled Sentimentality (2008) and Andrew Nestingen’s Crime and Fantasy in Scandinavia (2008) probe the boundaries of understanding the cultural and historical roots of genre and crime fiction. Nevertheless, the missing link in dealing with crime fiction – even though Nestingen takes certain steps in that direction – is often its connection to criminological and cultural studies. If we approach crime stories in general – both fact and fiction – and the cultural, philosophical and sociological components in the established presumptions of these stories, there seems to be a foundation of a general revision of the understanding and representation of crime and violence. Todd Herzog’s recent book Crime Stories is indeed part of this needed and remarkable wave of theoretical and historical revisions of our understanding of crime through factual and fictional representations.",
    keywords = "Krimifiktion, Samfund, Dekadence, Crime fiction, Society, Decadence",
    author = "Hansen, {Kim Toft}",
    year = "2010",
    language = "English",
    isbn = "978-87-91695-19-3",
    pages = "1--8",
    publisher = "Aalborg Universitet",
    type = "WorkingPaper",
    institution = "Aalborg Universitet",

    }

    Crime and German Decadence : Discussing Todd Herzog’s Crime Stories. / Hansen, Kim Toft.

    Aalborg : Aalborg Universitet, 2010. p. 1-8.

    Research output: Working paperResearch

    TY - UNPB

    T1 - Crime and German Decadence

    T2 - Discussing Todd Herzog’s Crime Stories

    AU - Hansen, Kim Toft

    PY - 2010

    Y1 - 2010

    N2 - In Crime Stories: Criminalistic Fantasy and the Culture of Crisis in Weimar Germany, Todd Herzog – explicitly or implicitly – deals with different established myths about crime fiction, criminality and its cultural presumptions. It is generally quite seldom – as Herzog does – that the three subjects are dealt with collectively and in doing so he establishes new grounds for reflection on crime and culture – both factual and fictional representation as such. Approaches to crime fiction often build on an acknowledged history of the genre which, then, reproduces an established concord of assumptions. In recent years, new and refreshing approaches to crime fiction have emerged where – among others – particularly Maurizio Ascari’s A Counter-History of Crime Fiction (2007), Leonard Cassuto’s Hard-Boiled Sentimentality (2008) and Andrew Nestingen’s Crime and Fantasy in Scandinavia (2008) probe the boundaries of understanding the cultural and historical roots of genre and crime fiction. Nevertheless, the missing link in dealing with crime fiction – even though Nestingen takes certain steps in that direction – is often its connection to criminological and cultural studies. If we approach crime stories in general – both fact and fiction – and the cultural, philosophical and sociological components in the established presumptions of these stories, there seems to be a foundation of a general revision of the understanding and representation of crime and violence. Todd Herzog’s recent book Crime Stories is indeed part of this needed and remarkable wave of theoretical and historical revisions of our understanding of crime through factual and fictional representations.

    AB - In Crime Stories: Criminalistic Fantasy and the Culture of Crisis in Weimar Germany, Todd Herzog – explicitly or implicitly – deals with different established myths about crime fiction, criminality and its cultural presumptions. It is generally quite seldom – as Herzog does – that the three subjects are dealt with collectively and in doing so he establishes new grounds for reflection on crime and culture – both factual and fictional representation as such. Approaches to crime fiction often build on an acknowledged history of the genre which, then, reproduces an established concord of assumptions. In recent years, new and refreshing approaches to crime fiction have emerged where – among others – particularly Maurizio Ascari’s A Counter-History of Crime Fiction (2007), Leonard Cassuto’s Hard-Boiled Sentimentality (2008) and Andrew Nestingen’s Crime and Fantasy in Scandinavia (2008) probe the boundaries of understanding the cultural and historical roots of genre and crime fiction. Nevertheless, the missing link in dealing with crime fiction – even though Nestingen takes certain steps in that direction – is often its connection to criminological and cultural studies. If we approach crime stories in general – both fact and fiction – and the cultural, philosophical and sociological components in the established presumptions of these stories, there seems to be a foundation of a general revision of the understanding and representation of crime and violence. Todd Herzog’s recent book Crime Stories is indeed part of this needed and remarkable wave of theoretical and historical revisions of our understanding of crime through factual and fictional representations.

    KW - Krimifiktion

    KW - Samfund

    KW - Dekadence

    KW - Crime fiction

    KW - Society

    KW - Decadence

    M3 - Working paper

    SN - 978-87-91695-19-3

    SP - 1

    EP - 8

    BT - Crime and German Decadence

    PB - Aalborg Universitet

    CY - Aalborg

    ER -