Design for reasoning

Research output: Contribution to conference without publisher/journalPaper without publisher/journalResearch

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The aim of this paper is to position interaction design and information architecture in relation to design of interfaces to ICT applications meant to serve the goal of supporting users’ reasoning, be it learning applications or self-service
applications such as citizen self-service. Interaction with such applications comprises three forms of reasoning: deduction, induction and abduction. Based on the work of Gregory Bateson, it is suggested that the disciplines of interaction
design and information architecture are complementary parts of information processes. To show that abduction, induction and deduction play together in an information process, the paper reviews three examples: Plato's Socratic dialogues, the sociology of inscriptions, the practice of police investigation. All three examples illustrate the main point of the paper: that interaction design and information architecture are different, complementary, and indispensible
for the information processes, and that design of sense making can not need both disciplines.
Original languageEnglish
Publication date2009
Publication statusPublished - 2009

Cite this

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title = "Design for reasoning",
abstract = "The aim of this paper is to position interaction design and information architecture in relation to design of interfaces to ICT applications meant to serve the goal of supporting users’ reasoning, be it learning applications or self-serviceapplications such as citizen self-service. Interaction with such applications comprises three forms of reasoning: deduction, induction and abduction. Based on the work of Gregory Bateson, it is suggested that the disciplines of interactiondesign and information architecture are complementary parts of information processes. To show that abduction, induction and deduction play together in an information process, the paper reviews three examples: Plato's Socratic dialogues, the sociology of inscriptions, the practice of police investigation. All three examples illustrate the main point of the paper: that interaction design and information architecture are different, complementary, and indispensiblefor the information processes, and that design of sense making can not need both disciplines.",
keywords = "Reasoning, information architecture, interaction design",
author = "Christiansen, {Ellen Tove}",
note = "Paper presented at DHRS, Aalborg November 2, 2009",
year = "2009",
language = "English",

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Design for reasoning. / Christiansen, Ellen Tove.

2009.

Research output: Contribution to conference without publisher/journalPaper without publisher/journalResearch

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AB - The aim of this paper is to position interaction design and information architecture in relation to design of interfaces to ICT applications meant to serve the goal of supporting users’ reasoning, be it learning applications or self-serviceapplications such as citizen self-service. Interaction with such applications comprises three forms of reasoning: deduction, induction and abduction. Based on the work of Gregory Bateson, it is suggested that the disciplines of interactiondesign and information architecture are complementary parts of information processes. To show that abduction, induction and deduction play together in an information process, the paper reviews three examples: Plato's Socratic dialogues, the sociology of inscriptions, the practice of police investigation. All three examples illustrate the main point of the paper: that interaction design and information architecture are different, complementary, and indispensiblefor the information processes, and that design of sense making can not need both disciplines.

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KW - information architecture

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M3 - Paper without publisher/journal

ER -