Abstract

AIM AND APPROACH

This paper investigates how Virtual Reality (VR) including Auralization has application for the building design process. The study is based on building design practises in Denmark and Norway captured through interviews and observations.

Recent years’ development of VR has lowered the cost of such tools and made it possible to not only use VR as a visualisation tool, but also as an interactive design platform (Svidt and Sørensen, 2012) (Petrova et al., 2017). Research in VR with Auralization in combination is how-ever still limited.

Use of VR with Auralization makes it possible to attain early user response on a design, get em-pirical measures of user’s performance and have iterative user testing (Gould and Lewis, 1985), (Kim, Cha and Kim, 2016), before a building is constructed. We therefore propose a combined audio-visual Engine to support the dialogue between designers and end-users, with no or limited acoustic expertise, in designing room acoustics to thereby increase the acoustic indoor environ-mental quality.

SCIENTIFIC INNOVATION AND RELEVANCE

The indoor environment has become an increasingly latent topic in the building industry in recent years. Only few studies consider how acoustics (sounds and noises) affects performances of per-sons, based on physically changing a room or using auralization (Reinten et al., 2017).

The development of a combined VR with Auralization Engine allows for evaluation of design alternatives from a combined visual and acoustic perspective. The use of VR including Auralization makes it possible to take multiple types of acoustic conditions into account, and have building designers and users experience noise from technical installations, neighbouring rooms and exterior of a building simultaneously. This allows for better understanding of how people experience the acoustics performance of a proposed design.

The VR with Auralization method has application in both new building design and renovation pro-jects. Through VR with Auralization, user involvement and interactions are furthermore possible, allowing for design inputs from multiple persons evaluating the same acoustic solution at the same time. This provides a better and more reliable foundation for selecting the optimal design than current practises.

PRELIMINARY RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS

Testing of VR with Auralization has given a positive response to the tool and allowed for further discussion regarding the need for more use of the method in building design companies in Den-mark and Norway.

A prototype test was done using VR with Auralization allowing test persons to listen to the acous-tics of a real room and a digital twin. The test persons indicated that VR with Auralization came close to the real acoustic properties and thereby gave a better decision foundation than using only acoustic standard values.

MAIN REFERENCES

Gould, J. D. and Lewis, C. (1985) ‘Designing for usability: key principles and what designers think’, Communications of the ACM, 28(3), pp. 300–311. doi: 10.1145/3166.3170.

Kim, T. W., Cha, S. H. and Kim, Y. (2016) ‘A framework for evaluating user involvement methods in architectural, engineering, and construction projects’, Architectural Science Review, 59(2), pp. 136–147. doi: 10.1080/00038628.2015.1008397.

Petrova, E. et al. (2017) ‘Integrating Virtual Reality and BIM for End-User Involvement in Design: A Case Study’, in Lean and Computing in Construction Congress - Volume 1: Proceedings of the Joint Conference on Computing in Construction. Edinburgh: Heriot-Watt University, pp. 699–706. doi: 10.24928/JC3-2017/0266.

Reinten, J. et al. (2017) ‘The indoor sound environment and human task performance: A literature review on the role of room acoustics’, Building and Environment. Elsevier Ltd, 123, pp. 315–332. doi: 10.1016/j.buildenv.2017.07.005.

Svidt, K. and Sørensen, J. B. (2012) ‘Development of a Virtual Reality Solution for End User Involvement in Interior Design’, eCAADe: Conferences, 2, pp. 541–546.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of Building Simulation 2019
Publication date2019
Publication statusIn preparation - 2019
EventBuilding Simulation: 16th international IBPSA conference and exhibition - Angelicum Congress Centre, Rome, Italy
Duration: 2 Sep 20194 Sep 2019
Conference number: 16
http://buildingsimulation2019.org/overview/

Conference

ConferenceBuilding Simulation
Number16
LocationAngelicum Congress Centre
CountryItaly
CityRome
Period02/09/201904/09/2019
Internet address

Keywords

  • Virtual Reality
  • Auralization
  • System Development

Cite this

Wyke, S. C. S., Svidt, K., Christensen, F., Bendix Sørensen, J., Mithun Fadnes , T., & Jensen, R. L. (2019). Designing Room Acoustics Using Virtual Reality With Auralization. Manuscript in preparation. In Proceedings of Building Simulation 2019
Wyke, Simon Christian Swanström ; Svidt, Kjeld ; Christensen, Flemming ; Bendix Sørensen, Jesper ; Mithun Fadnes , Togeir ; Jensen, Rasmus Lund. / Designing Room Acoustics Using Virtual Reality With Auralization. Proceedings of Building Simulation 2019. 2019.
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abstract = "AIM AND APPROACHThis paper investigates how Virtual Reality (VR) including Auralization has application for the building design process. The study is based on building design practises in Denmark and Norway captured through interviews and observations.Recent years’ development of VR has lowered the cost of such tools and made it possible to not only use VR as a visualisation tool, but also as an interactive design platform (Svidt and S{\o}rensen, 2012) (Petrova et al., 2017). Research in VR with Auralization in combination is how-ever still limited.Use of VR with Auralization makes it possible to attain early user response on a design, get em-pirical measures of user’s performance and have iterative user testing (Gould and Lewis, 1985), (Kim, Cha and Kim, 2016), before a building is constructed. We therefore propose a combined audio-visual Engine to support the dialogue between designers and end-users, with no or limited acoustic expertise, in designing room acoustics to thereby increase the acoustic indoor environ-mental quality.SCIENTIFIC INNOVATION AND RELEVANCEThe indoor environment has become an increasingly latent topic in the building industry in recent years. Only few studies consider how acoustics (sounds and noises) affects performances of per-sons, based on physically changing a room or using auralization (Reinten et al., 2017).The development of a combined VR with Auralization Engine allows for evaluation of design alternatives from a combined visual and acoustic perspective. The use of VR including Auralization makes it possible to take multiple types of acoustic conditions into account, and have building designers and users experience noise from technical installations, neighbouring rooms and exterior of a building simultaneously. This allows for better understanding of how people experience the acoustics performance of a proposed design.The VR with Auralization method has application in both new building design and renovation pro-jects. Through VR with Auralization, user involvement and interactions are furthermore possible, allowing for design inputs from multiple persons evaluating the same acoustic solution at the same time. This provides a better and more reliable foundation for selecting the optimal design than current practises.PRELIMINARY RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONSTesting of VR with Auralization has given a positive response to the tool and allowed for further discussion regarding the need for more use of the method in building design companies in Den-mark and Norway.A prototype test was done using VR with Auralization allowing test persons to listen to the acous-tics of a real room and a digital twin. The test persons indicated that VR with Auralization came close to the real acoustic properties and thereby gave a better decision foundation than using only acoustic standard values.MAIN REFERENCESGould, J. D. and Lewis, C. (1985) ‘Designing for usability: key principles and what designers think’, Communications of the ACM, 28(3), pp. 300–311. doi: 10.1145/3166.3170.Kim, T. W., Cha, S. H. and Kim, Y. (2016) ‘A framework for evaluating user involvement methods in architectural, engineering, and construction projects’, Architectural Science Review, 59(2), pp. 136–147. doi: 10.1080/00038628.2015.1008397.Petrova, E. et al. (2017) ‘Integrating Virtual Reality and BIM for End-User Involvement in Design: A Case Study’, in Lean and Computing in Construction Congress - Volume 1: Proceedings of the Joint Conference on Computing in Construction. Edinburgh: Heriot-Watt University, pp. 699–706. doi: 10.24928/JC3-2017/0266.Reinten, J. et al. (2017) ‘The indoor sound environment and human task performance: A literature review on the role of room acoustics’, Building and Environment. Elsevier Ltd, 123, pp. 315–332. doi: 10.1016/j.buildenv.2017.07.005.Svidt, K. and S{\o}rensen, J. B. (2012) ‘Development of a Virtual Reality Solution for End User Involvement in Interior Design’, eCAADe: Conferences, 2, pp. 541–546.",
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Wyke, SCS, Svidt, K, Christensen, F, Bendix Sørensen, J, Mithun Fadnes , T & Jensen, RL 2019, Designing Room Acoustics Using Virtual Reality With Auralization. in Proceedings of Building Simulation 2019., Rome, Italy, 02/09/2019.

Designing Room Acoustics Using Virtual Reality With Auralization. / Wyke, Simon Christian Swanström; Svidt, Kjeld; Christensen, Flemming; Bendix Sørensen, Jesper ; Mithun Fadnes , Togeir ; Jensen, Rasmus Lund.

Proceedings of Building Simulation 2019. 2019.

Research output: Contribution to book/anthology/report/conference proceedingArticle in proceedingResearchpeer-review

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AU - Mithun Fadnes , Togeir

AU - Jensen, Rasmus Lund

PY - 2019

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N2 - AIM AND APPROACHThis paper investigates how Virtual Reality (VR) including Auralization has application for the building design process. The study is based on building design practises in Denmark and Norway captured through interviews and observations.Recent years’ development of VR has lowered the cost of such tools and made it possible to not only use VR as a visualisation tool, but also as an interactive design platform (Svidt and Sørensen, 2012) (Petrova et al., 2017). Research in VR with Auralization in combination is how-ever still limited.Use of VR with Auralization makes it possible to attain early user response on a design, get em-pirical measures of user’s performance and have iterative user testing (Gould and Lewis, 1985), (Kim, Cha and Kim, 2016), before a building is constructed. We therefore propose a combined audio-visual Engine to support the dialogue between designers and end-users, with no or limited acoustic expertise, in designing room acoustics to thereby increase the acoustic indoor environ-mental quality.SCIENTIFIC INNOVATION AND RELEVANCEThe indoor environment has become an increasingly latent topic in the building industry in recent years. Only few studies consider how acoustics (sounds and noises) affects performances of per-sons, based on physically changing a room or using auralization (Reinten et al., 2017).The development of a combined VR with Auralization Engine allows for evaluation of design alternatives from a combined visual and acoustic perspective. The use of VR including Auralization makes it possible to take multiple types of acoustic conditions into account, and have building designers and users experience noise from technical installations, neighbouring rooms and exterior of a building simultaneously. This allows for better understanding of how people experience the acoustics performance of a proposed design.The VR with Auralization method has application in both new building design and renovation pro-jects. Through VR with Auralization, user involvement and interactions are furthermore possible, allowing for design inputs from multiple persons evaluating the same acoustic solution at the same time. This provides a better and more reliable foundation for selecting the optimal design than current practises.PRELIMINARY RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONSTesting of VR with Auralization has given a positive response to the tool and allowed for further discussion regarding the need for more use of the method in building design companies in Den-mark and Norway.A prototype test was done using VR with Auralization allowing test persons to listen to the acous-tics of a real room and a digital twin. The test persons indicated that VR with Auralization came close to the real acoustic properties and thereby gave a better decision foundation than using only acoustic standard values.MAIN REFERENCESGould, J. D. and Lewis, C. (1985) ‘Designing for usability: key principles and what designers think’, Communications of the ACM, 28(3), pp. 300–311. doi: 10.1145/3166.3170.Kim, T. W., Cha, S. H. and Kim, Y. (2016) ‘A framework for evaluating user involvement methods in architectural, engineering, and construction projects’, Architectural Science Review, 59(2), pp. 136–147. doi: 10.1080/00038628.2015.1008397.Petrova, E. et al. (2017) ‘Integrating Virtual Reality and BIM for End-User Involvement in Design: A Case Study’, in Lean and Computing in Construction Congress - Volume 1: Proceedings of the Joint Conference on Computing in Construction. Edinburgh: Heriot-Watt University, pp. 699–706. doi: 10.24928/JC3-2017/0266.Reinten, J. et al. (2017) ‘The indoor sound environment and human task performance: A literature review on the role of room acoustics’, Building and Environment. Elsevier Ltd, 123, pp. 315–332. doi: 10.1016/j.buildenv.2017.07.005.Svidt, K. and Sørensen, J. B. (2012) ‘Development of a Virtual Reality Solution for End User Involvement in Interior Design’, eCAADe: Conferences, 2, pp. 541–546.

AB - AIM AND APPROACHThis paper investigates how Virtual Reality (VR) including Auralization has application for the building design process. The study is based on building design practises in Denmark and Norway captured through interviews and observations.Recent years’ development of VR has lowered the cost of such tools and made it possible to not only use VR as a visualisation tool, but also as an interactive design platform (Svidt and Sørensen, 2012) (Petrova et al., 2017). Research in VR with Auralization in combination is how-ever still limited.Use of VR with Auralization makes it possible to attain early user response on a design, get em-pirical measures of user’s performance and have iterative user testing (Gould and Lewis, 1985), (Kim, Cha and Kim, 2016), before a building is constructed. We therefore propose a combined audio-visual Engine to support the dialogue between designers and end-users, with no or limited acoustic expertise, in designing room acoustics to thereby increase the acoustic indoor environ-mental quality.SCIENTIFIC INNOVATION AND RELEVANCEThe indoor environment has become an increasingly latent topic in the building industry in recent years. Only few studies consider how acoustics (sounds and noises) affects performances of per-sons, based on physically changing a room or using auralization (Reinten et al., 2017).The development of a combined VR with Auralization Engine allows for evaluation of design alternatives from a combined visual and acoustic perspective. The use of VR including Auralization makes it possible to take multiple types of acoustic conditions into account, and have building designers and users experience noise from technical installations, neighbouring rooms and exterior of a building simultaneously. This allows for better understanding of how people experience the acoustics performance of a proposed design.The VR with Auralization method has application in both new building design and renovation pro-jects. Through VR with Auralization, user involvement and interactions are furthermore possible, allowing for design inputs from multiple persons evaluating the same acoustic solution at the same time. This provides a better and more reliable foundation for selecting the optimal design than current practises.PRELIMINARY RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONSTesting of VR with Auralization has given a positive response to the tool and allowed for further discussion regarding the need for more use of the method in building design companies in Den-mark and Norway.A prototype test was done using VR with Auralization allowing test persons to listen to the acous-tics of a real room and a digital twin. The test persons indicated that VR with Auralization came close to the real acoustic properties and thereby gave a better decision foundation than using only acoustic standard values.MAIN REFERENCESGould, J. D. and Lewis, C. (1985) ‘Designing for usability: key principles and what designers think’, Communications of the ACM, 28(3), pp. 300–311. doi: 10.1145/3166.3170.Kim, T. W., Cha, S. H. and Kim, Y. (2016) ‘A framework for evaluating user involvement methods in architectural, engineering, and construction projects’, Architectural Science Review, 59(2), pp. 136–147. doi: 10.1080/00038628.2015.1008397.Petrova, E. et al. (2017) ‘Integrating Virtual Reality and BIM for End-User Involvement in Design: A Case Study’, in Lean and Computing in Construction Congress - Volume 1: Proceedings of the Joint Conference on Computing in Construction. Edinburgh: Heriot-Watt University, pp. 699–706. doi: 10.24928/JC3-2017/0266.Reinten, J. et al. (2017) ‘The indoor sound environment and human task performance: A literature review on the role of room acoustics’, Building and Environment. Elsevier Ltd, 123, pp. 315–332. doi: 10.1016/j.buildenv.2017.07.005.Svidt, K. and Sørensen, J. B. (2012) ‘Development of a Virtual Reality Solution for End User Involvement in Interior Design’, eCAADe: Conferences, 2, pp. 541–546.

KW - Virtual Reality

KW - Auralization

KW - System Development

M3 - Article in proceeding

BT - Proceedings of Building Simulation 2019

ER -

Wyke SCS, Svidt K, Christensen F, Bendix Sørensen J, Mithun Fadnes T, Jensen RL. Designing Room Acoustics Using Virtual Reality With Auralization. In Proceedings of Building Simulation 2019. 2019