Development and simulation of a passive upper extremity orthosis for amyoplasia

Erik Føge Jensen, Joakim Raunsbæk, Jan Nørgaard Lund, Tariq Rahman, John Rasmussen, Miguel Nobre Castro

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

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Abstract

Introduction
People who are born with arthrogryposis multiplex congenita are typically not able to perform activities of daily living (ADL) due to decreased muscle mass, joint contractures and unnatural upper extremity positioning. They are, therefore, potential users of an assistive device capable of aiding in ADL and increasing their independence. A passive orthosis can support the weight of their arm against gravity, allowing them to perform movements with less effort.
Methods
This study presents a prototype design with four degrees-of-freedom that uses musculoskeletal modelling to optimize the stiffness of the springs in the device to partially gravity balance the upper extremity while compensating for the usual internally rotated glenohumeral joint. A single subject-specific musculoskeletal model was developed to simulate the effects of the passive orthosis during 10 static postures during ADL.
Results
For a given configuration using a mono- and a bi-articular spring, the simulations showed that spring stiffnesses of 400?Nm?1 and of 1029?Nm?1, respectively, were able to lower the maximal muscle activity estimated by the musculoskeletal model to a level in which the 10 postures can be realized.
Conclusion
By augmenting residual muscle strength with a partially gravity-balanced passive orthosis, ADLs may be achievable for people with arthrogryposis multiplex congenita.
Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Rehabilitation and Assistive Technologies Engineering
Volume5
ISSN2055-6683
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018

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Muscle
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Stiffness

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@article{665bcff976394553a6f645ea82815da4,
title = "Development and simulation of a passive upper extremity orthosis for amyoplasia",
abstract = "IntroductionPeople who are born with arthrogryposis multiplex congenita are typically not able to perform activities of daily living (ADL) due to decreased muscle mass, joint contractures and unnatural upper extremity positioning. They are, therefore, potential users of an assistive device capable of aiding in ADL and increasing their independence. A passive orthosis can support the weight of their arm against gravity, allowing them to perform movements with less effort.MethodsThis study presents a prototype design with four degrees-of-freedom that uses musculoskeletal modelling to optimize the stiffness of the springs in the device to partially gravity balance the upper extremity while compensating for the usual internally rotated glenohumeral joint. A single subject-specific musculoskeletal model was developed to simulate the effects of the passive orthosis during 10 static postures during ADL.ResultsFor a given configuration using a mono- and a bi-articular spring, the simulations showed that spring stiffnesses of 400?Nm?1 and of 1029?Nm?1, respectively, were able to lower the maximal muscle activity estimated by the musculoskeletal model to a level in which the 10 postures can be realized.ConclusionBy augmenting residual muscle strength with a partially gravity-balanced passive orthosis, ADLs may be achievable for people with arthrogryposis multiplex congenita.",
author = "Jensen, {Erik F{\o}ge} and Joakim Raunsb{\ae}k and Lund, {Jan N{\o}rgaard} and Tariq Rahman and John Rasmussen and Castro, {Miguel Nobre}",
year = "2018",
doi = "10.1177/2055668318761525",
language = "English",
volume = "5",
journal = "Journal of Rehabilitation and Assistive Technologies",
issn = "2055-6683",
publisher = "SAGE Publications",

}

Development and simulation of a passive upper extremity orthosis for amyoplasia. / Jensen, Erik Føge; Raunsbæk, Joakim; Lund, Jan Nørgaard; Rahman, Tariq; Rasmussen, John; Castro, Miguel Nobre.

In: Journal of Rehabilitation and Assistive Technologies Engineering, Vol. 5, 2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Development and simulation of a passive upper extremity orthosis for amyoplasia

AU - Jensen, Erik Føge

AU - Raunsbæk, Joakim

AU - Lund, Jan Nørgaard

AU - Rahman, Tariq

AU - Rasmussen, John

AU - Castro, Miguel Nobre

PY - 2018

Y1 - 2018

N2 - IntroductionPeople who are born with arthrogryposis multiplex congenita are typically not able to perform activities of daily living (ADL) due to decreased muscle mass, joint contractures and unnatural upper extremity positioning. They are, therefore, potential users of an assistive device capable of aiding in ADL and increasing their independence. A passive orthosis can support the weight of their arm against gravity, allowing them to perform movements with less effort.MethodsThis study presents a prototype design with four degrees-of-freedom that uses musculoskeletal modelling to optimize the stiffness of the springs in the device to partially gravity balance the upper extremity while compensating for the usual internally rotated glenohumeral joint. A single subject-specific musculoskeletal model was developed to simulate the effects of the passive orthosis during 10 static postures during ADL.ResultsFor a given configuration using a mono- and a bi-articular spring, the simulations showed that spring stiffnesses of 400?Nm?1 and of 1029?Nm?1, respectively, were able to lower the maximal muscle activity estimated by the musculoskeletal model to a level in which the 10 postures can be realized.ConclusionBy augmenting residual muscle strength with a partially gravity-balanced passive orthosis, ADLs may be achievable for people with arthrogryposis multiplex congenita.

AB - IntroductionPeople who are born with arthrogryposis multiplex congenita are typically not able to perform activities of daily living (ADL) due to decreased muscle mass, joint contractures and unnatural upper extremity positioning. They are, therefore, potential users of an assistive device capable of aiding in ADL and increasing their independence. A passive orthosis can support the weight of their arm against gravity, allowing them to perform movements with less effort.MethodsThis study presents a prototype design with four degrees-of-freedom that uses musculoskeletal modelling to optimize the stiffness of the springs in the device to partially gravity balance the upper extremity while compensating for the usual internally rotated glenohumeral joint. A single subject-specific musculoskeletal model was developed to simulate the effects of the passive orthosis during 10 static postures during ADL.ResultsFor a given configuration using a mono- and a bi-articular spring, the simulations showed that spring stiffnesses of 400?Nm?1 and of 1029?Nm?1, respectively, were able to lower the maximal muscle activity estimated by the musculoskeletal model to a level in which the 10 postures can be realized.ConclusionBy augmenting residual muscle strength with a partially gravity-balanced passive orthosis, ADLs may be achievable for people with arthrogryposis multiplex congenita.

U2 - 10.1177/2055668318761525

DO - 10.1177/2055668318761525

M3 - Journal article

VL - 5

JO - Journal of Rehabilitation and Assistive Technologies

JF - Journal of Rehabilitation and Assistive Technologies

SN - 2055-6683

ER -