Developments in the relationship between large cities - the suburban zone and the rural/urban hinterland: Analysis of commute patterns around large European and American cities

Thomas Alexander Sick Nielsen, Henrik Harder Hovgesen

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Abstract

Many countries collect data on commuting that allows the analysis of how commuting develops over time - and – through the availability of origin-destination data.– also the analysis of functional interdependencies between sub-areas and the patterning of interaction more generally. In the case of the US, O-D data on commuting has been used to delimit metropolitan areas for statistical purposes for more than 50 years – based on the interdependencies between suburbs and a central city that is revealed by the commute pattern. Despite the debates on the multifaceted nature of functional interdependency between areas – and despite the rising importance of other transport purposes than commuting – commute data continues to be widely used as the prime indicator of functional integration between areas: The lack of other suitable geographically representative O-D data is probably the most important reason for this. The commute question is relatively simple and unambiguous and can therefore easily be included in a census – or the information can be extracted from public registers as in the Scandinavian countries. In recent years, commute data has become available with more geographical details (small zones) and the ability to treat this data in new ways has been greatly improved through the availability of geographical information systems (GIS). This paper aims to take advantage of the availability of comparable data on commuting in European urban regions and to take a broader look at the developments in the relationship between the urban core, its suburban areas and the rural/urban hinterland. The analysis uses data on commuting between small geographical zones to perform the analysis as “realistically” as possible. The paper combines a GIS-based approach (with maps of commuter-flows) and inventories highlighting the relationship between centrality, directionality and commute-distances.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationCities in City Regions
Number of pages17
PublisherEuropean Urban Research Association (EURA)
Publication date2006
ISBN (Electronic)intet
Publication statusPublished - 2006
EventCities in City Regions : Bi-Annual EURA Conference - Warszawa, Poland
Duration: 11 May 200614 May 2006
Conference number: 1

Conference

ConferenceCities in City Regions : Bi-Annual EURA Conference
Number1
CountryPoland
CityWarszawa
Period11/05/200614/05/2006

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