Disability Disqualifies: A vignette experiment of Danish employers' inclination to hire applicants with physical disabilities

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Abstract

Based on a vignette experiment with Danish employers using five different descriptions of a fictitious job applicant, this article shows that disability is itself disqualifying for an applicant in a hiring process, regardless of what additional information related to the applicant the employer receives. Compared to a description of an impliedly able-bodied applicant, employers’ likelihood of hiring drops significantly when they receive an other-wise identical description of an applicant in which information on the applicant using a wheelchair is added. Adding information on economic compensation schemes increases the likelihood of hiring the disabled applicant slightly, but a recommendation from the public employment service does not motivate employers to take on the applicant and adding information on the potential for increased workload does not discourage them further. Overall, the results clearly demonstrate that physical disability tends to disqualify an applicant.
Original languageEnglish
JournalScandinavian Journal of Disability Research
Pages (from-to)1
Number of pages37
ISSN1501-7419
Publication statusSubmitted - 27 Jun 2019

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Wheelchairs
Workload
Compensation and Redress
Economics

Keywords

  • Disability
  • Employment
  • Vignette experiment
  • Employers

Cite this

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title = "Disability Disqualifies: A vignette experiment of Danish employers' inclination to hire applicants with physical disabilities",
abstract = "Based on a vignette experiment with Danish employers using five different descriptions of a fictitious job applicant, this article shows that disability is itself disqualifying for an applicant in a hiring process, regardless of what additional information related to the applicant the employer receives. Compared to a description of an impliedly able-bodied applicant, employers’ likelihood of hiring drops significantly when they receive an other-wise identical description of an applicant in which information on the applicant using a wheelchair is added. Adding information on economic compensation schemes increases the likelihood of hiring the disabled applicant slightly, but a recommendation from the public employment service does not motivate employers to take on the applicant and adding information on the potential for increased workload does not discourage them further. Overall, the results clearly demonstrate that physical disability tends to disqualify an applicant.",
keywords = "Disability, Employment, Vignette experiment, Employers, Disability, Employment, Employers, Vignette experiment",
author = "Ditte Shamshiri-Petersen and Cecilie Krogh",
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N2 - Based on a vignette experiment with Danish employers using five different descriptions of a fictitious job applicant, this article shows that disability is itself disqualifying for an applicant in a hiring process, regardless of what additional information related to the applicant the employer receives. Compared to a description of an impliedly able-bodied applicant, employers’ likelihood of hiring drops significantly when they receive an other-wise identical description of an applicant in which information on the applicant using a wheelchair is added. Adding information on economic compensation schemes increases the likelihood of hiring the disabled applicant slightly, but a recommendation from the public employment service does not motivate employers to take on the applicant and adding information on the potential for increased workload does not discourage them further. Overall, the results clearly demonstrate that physical disability tends to disqualify an applicant.

AB - Based on a vignette experiment with Danish employers using five different descriptions of a fictitious job applicant, this article shows that disability is itself disqualifying for an applicant in a hiring process, regardless of what additional information related to the applicant the employer receives. Compared to a description of an impliedly able-bodied applicant, employers’ likelihood of hiring drops significantly when they receive an other-wise identical description of an applicant in which information on the applicant using a wheelchair is added. Adding information on economic compensation schemes increases the likelihood of hiring the disabled applicant slightly, but a recommendation from the public employment service does not motivate employers to take on the applicant and adding information on the potential for increased workload does not discourage them further. Overall, the results clearly demonstrate that physical disability tends to disqualify an applicant.

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