Divided Uncertainty: A phenomenology of trust and confidence

Research output: Contribution to conference without publisher/journalPaper without publisher/journalResearchpeer-review

146 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Trust as a concept is inherently intertwined with institutional concepts. Trust, according to contemporary research, may be directed at both people and institutions, trust may in itself be an institution, and the influence of institutions may affect both trust in other people and trust in other institutions. This conceptual stretching takes place at the expense of accuracy and clarity clouding our understanding of the multiple levels involved in trusting. This chapter seeks to clarify this issue conceptually by comparing and developing Niklas Luhmann’s system theoretical investigation of trust and confidence with Knud E. Løgstrup’s phenomenology of trust. The main argument presented here is that while Luhmann’s analysis of trust and confidence remains one of the most powerful and persuasive it is only when combining it with Løgstrup’s phenomenology of trusting as situated process that the linkages between trust and confidence – the interpersonal and the institutional – emerges.
Original languageEnglish
Publication date5 Mar 2014
Publication statusPublished - 5 Mar 2014
EventSixth Seminar of the Nordic Research Network on Trust - Copenhagen, Denmark
Duration: 5 Mar 20146 Mar 2014

Seminar

SeminarSixth Seminar of the Nordic Research Network on Trust
CountryDenmark
CityCopenhagen
Period05/03/201406/03/2014

Fingerprint

phenomenology
confidence
uncertainty

Cite this

Frederiksen, M. (2014). Divided Uncertainty: A phenomenology of trust and confidence. Paper presented at Sixth Seminar of the Nordic Research Network on Trust , Copenhagen, Denmark.
Frederiksen, Morten. / Divided Uncertainty : A phenomenology of trust and confidence. Paper presented at Sixth Seminar of the Nordic Research Network on Trust , Copenhagen, Denmark.
@conference{2a05ce245526447ca7105b72badeb9d6,
title = "Divided Uncertainty: A phenomenology of trust and confidence",
abstract = "Trust as a concept is inherently intertwined with institutional concepts. Trust, according to contemporary research, may be directed at both people and institutions, trust may in itself be an institution, and the influence of institutions may affect both trust in other people and trust in other institutions. This conceptual stretching takes place at the expense of accuracy and clarity clouding our understanding of the multiple levels involved in trusting. This chapter seeks to clarify this issue conceptually by comparing and developing Niklas Luhmann’s system theoretical investigation of trust and confidence with Knud E. L{\o}gstrup’s phenomenology of trust. The main argument presented here is that while Luhmann’s analysis of trust and confidence remains one of the most powerful and persuasive it is only when combining it with L{\o}gstrup’s phenomenology of trusting as situated process that the linkages between trust and confidence – the interpersonal and the institutional – emerges.",
author = "Morten Frederiksen",
year = "2014",
month = "3",
day = "5",
language = "English",
note = "Sixth Seminar of the Nordic Research Network on Trust ; Conference date: 05-03-2014 Through 06-03-2014",

}

Frederiksen, M 2014, 'Divided Uncertainty: A phenomenology of trust and confidence', Paper presented at Sixth Seminar of the Nordic Research Network on Trust , Copenhagen, Denmark, 05/03/2014 - 06/03/2014.

Divided Uncertainty : A phenomenology of trust and confidence. / Frederiksen, Morten.

2014. Paper presented at Sixth Seminar of the Nordic Research Network on Trust , Copenhagen, Denmark.

Research output: Contribution to conference without publisher/journalPaper without publisher/journalResearchpeer-review

TY - CONF

T1 - Divided Uncertainty

T2 - Sixth Seminar of the Nordic Research Network on Trust

AU - Frederiksen, Morten

PY - 2014/3/5

Y1 - 2014/3/5

N2 - Trust as a concept is inherently intertwined with institutional concepts. Trust, according to contemporary research, may be directed at both people and institutions, trust may in itself be an institution, and the influence of institutions may affect both trust in other people and trust in other institutions. This conceptual stretching takes place at the expense of accuracy and clarity clouding our understanding of the multiple levels involved in trusting. This chapter seeks to clarify this issue conceptually by comparing and developing Niklas Luhmann’s system theoretical investigation of trust and confidence with Knud E. Løgstrup’s phenomenology of trust. The main argument presented here is that while Luhmann’s analysis of trust and confidence remains one of the most powerful and persuasive it is only when combining it with Løgstrup’s phenomenology of trusting as situated process that the linkages between trust and confidence – the interpersonal and the institutional – emerges.

AB - Trust as a concept is inherently intertwined with institutional concepts. Trust, according to contemporary research, may be directed at both people and institutions, trust may in itself be an institution, and the influence of institutions may affect both trust in other people and trust in other institutions. This conceptual stretching takes place at the expense of accuracy and clarity clouding our understanding of the multiple levels involved in trusting. This chapter seeks to clarify this issue conceptually by comparing and developing Niklas Luhmann’s system theoretical investigation of trust and confidence with Knud E. Løgstrup’s phenomenology of trust. The main argument presented here is that while Luhmann’s analysis of trust and confidence remains one of the most powerful and persuasive it is only when combining it with Løgstrup’s phenomenology of trusting as situated process that the linkages between trust and confidence – the interpersonal and the institutional – emerges.

M3 - Paper without publisher/journal

Y2 - 5 March 2014 through 6 March 2014

ER -

Frederiksen M. Divided Uncertainty: A phenomenology of trust and confidence. 2014. Paper presented at Sixth Seminar of the Nordic Research Network on Trust , Copenhagen, Denmark.