Doing care work on the fly – exploring the unnoticed socio‐emotional skills of male ambulance staff

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Prehospital ambulance work is a healthcare arena hitherto neglected by sociologists of health and illness. This is unfortunate because it is an interesting and dynamic area, and in contrast to most healthcare sectors, it is male dominated. Via ethnographic fieldwork, this article examines the particular caring practices and socio-emotional skills that ambulance staff use in practising prehospital care work. The empirical analysis outlines six recurring prehospital practices: medicine work, machine work, scene management, becalming work, communication work and bodywork. Each practice represents a different element of prehospital care practice and is best understood as a repertoire, as many different assemblages of these care practices can work effectively in prehospital situations. The article concludes that despite institutionalised blue-collar masculinity, numeric dominance and scarce formal education in ambulance psychology, male ambulance staff are generally proud and reflexive care practitioners.

Original languageEnglish
JournalSociology of Health and Illness
ISSN0141-9889
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 14 Nov 2019

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Ambulances
Diptera
staff
machine work
Masculinity
Health Care Sector
Massage
sociologist
masculinity
Practice Guidelines
illness
psychology
medicine
Communication
Medicine
Psychology
communication
Delivery of Health Care
Education
health

Cite this

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title = "Doing care work on the fly – exploring the unnoticed socio‐emotional skills of male ambulance staff",
abstract = "Prehospital ambulance work is a healthcare arena hitherto neglected by sociologists of health and illness. This is unfortunate because it is an interesting and dynamic area, and in contrast to most healthcare sectors, it is male dominated. Via ethnographic fieldwork, this article examines the particular caring practices and socio-emotional skills that ambulance staff use in practising prehospital care work. The empirical analysis outlines six recurring prehospital practices: medicine work, machine work, scene management, becalming work, communication work and bodywork. Each practice represents a different element of prehospital care practice and is best understood as a repertoire, as many different assemblages of these care practices can work effectively in prehospital situations. The article concludes that despite institutionalised blue-collar masculinity, numeric dominance and scarce formal education in ambulance psychology, male ambulance staff are generally proud and reflexive care practitioners.",
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Doing care work on the fly – exploring the unnoticed socio‐emotional skills of male ambulance staff. / Kyed, Morten.

In: Sociology of Health and Illness, 14.11.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

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AB - Prehospital ambulance work is a healthcare arena hitherto neglected by sociologists of health and illness. This is unfortunate because it is an interesting and dynamic area, and in contrast to most healthcare sectors, it is male dominated. Via ethnographic fieldwork, this article examines the particular caring practices and socio-emotional skills that ambulance staff use in practising prehospital care work. The empirical analysis outlines six recurring prehospital practices: medicine work, machine work, scene management, becalming work, communication work and bodywork. Each practice represents a different element of prehospital care practice and is best understood as a repertoire, as many different assemblages of these care practices can work effectively in prehospital situations. The article concludes that despite institutionalised blue-collar masculinity, numeric dominance and scarce formal education in ambulance psychology, male ambulance staff are generally proud and reflexive care practitioners.

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