Economic Potential of Industrializing Floating Wind Turbine Foundations

Research output: Contribution to book/anthology/report/conference proceedingArticle in proceedingResearchpeer-review

Abstract

The potential of offshore wind is enormous. It could meet Europes electric energy demand seven times over, and the United States energy demand four times over. However, much of the offshore potential is at water depths that can only be served by floating systems. In order to truly enable floating offshore wind, the cost of energy needs to reach the level of fixed-bottom offshore wind. At the present time, a number of suppliers are offering floating offshore wind foundations, but at cost levels that are prohibitive for large-scale application. The root cause of the high cost levels is that existing designs have emerged from the offshore oil and gas sector; they are manufactured using conventional, non-industrialized methods, weights are measured in thousands of tons and manufacturing times are measured in months. In contrast, the TetraSpar concept is based on the application of proven design and manufacturing technologies from the highly competitive wind industry. As a result, the weight is only a fraction of the weight of other floating wind turbine foundations, manufacturing takes place in factories using industrialized methods, and assembly and installation is measured in days or weeks, not months. The foundation and wind turbine can be installed in any port of a reasonable size using a standard, land-based crane, and the complete assembly can be towed to site and hooked up to the moorings and the electrical cable using standard tugs. This paper presents how these desirable economic traits of the TetraSpar design are achievable, and how the near future feasibility of offshore floating wind turbines may develop as a consequence of this radical change in cost levels.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationASME 2018 Proceedings of the 37th International Conference on Offshore Mechanics and Arctic Engineering - OMAE
Number of pages8
Volume1: Offshore Technology
PublisherAmerican Society of Mechanical Engineers
Publication date2018
PagesV001T01A045
Article numberOMAE2018-77660
ISBN (Electronic)978-0-7918-5120-3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018
Event37th International Conference on Ocean, Offshore and Arctic Engineering - Madrid, Spain
Duration: 17 Jun 201822 Jun 2018
Conference number: 37
https://www.asme.org/events/omae

Conference

Conference37th International Conference on Ocean, Offshore and Arctic Engineering
Number37
CountrySpain
CityMadrid
Period17/06/201822/06/2018
Internet address
SeriesInternational Conference on Offshore Mechanics and Arctic Engineering. Proceedings
ISSN1523-651X

Fingerprint

Wind turbines
Economics
Costs
Mooring
Cranes
Electron energy levels
Industrial plants
Cables
Gases
Water
Industry

Keywords

  • Floating wind turbines
  • Wind turbines

Cite this

Andersen, M. T., Tetu, A., & Stiesdal, H. (2018). Economic Potential of Industrializing Floating Wind Turbine Foundations. In ASME 2018 Proceedings of the 37th International Conference on Offshore Mechanics and Arctic Engineering - OMAE (Vol. 1: Offshore Technology, pp. V001T01A045). [OMAE2018-77660] American Society of Mechanical Engineers. International Conference on Offshore Mechanics and Arctic Engineering. Proceedings https://doi.org/10.1115/OMAE2018-77660
Andersen, Morten Thøtt ; Tetu, Amélie ; Stiesdal, Henrik. / Economic Potential of Industrializing Floating Wind Turbine Foundations. ASME 2018 Proceedings of the 37th International Conference on Offshore Mechanics and Arctic Engineering - OMAE. Vol. 1: Offshore Technology American Society of Mechanical Engineers, 2018. pp. V001T01A045 (International Conference on Offshore Mechanics and Arctic Engineering. Proceedings).
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abstract = "The potential of offshore wind is enormous. It could meet Europes electric energy demand seven times over, and the United States energy demand four times over. However, much of the offshore potential is at water depths that can only be served by floating systems. In order to truly enable floating offshore wind, the cost of energy needs to reach the level of fixed-bottom offshore wind. At the present time, a number of suppliers are offering floating offshore wind foundations, but at cost levels that are prohibitive for large-scale application. The root cause of the high cost levels is that existing designs have emerged from the offshore oil and gas sector; they are manufactured using conventional, non-industrialized methods, weights are measured in thousands of tons and manufacturing times are measured in months. In contrast, the TetraSpar concept is based on the application of proven design and manufacturing technologies from the highly competitive wind industry. As a result, the weight is only a fraction of the weight of other floating wind turbine foundations, manufacturing takes place in factories using industrialized methods, and assembly and installation is measured in days or weeks, not months. The foundation and wind turbine can be installed in any port of a reasonable size using a standard, land-based crane, and the complete assembly can be towed to site and hooked up to the moorings and the electrical cable using standard tugs. This paper presents how these desirable economic traits of the TetraSpar design are achievable, and how the near future feasibility of offshore floating wind turbines may develop as a consequence of this radical change in cost levels.",
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Andersen, MT, Tetu, A & Stiesdal, H 2018, Economic Potential of Industrializing Floating Wind Turbine Foundations. in ASME 2018 Proceedings of the 37th International Conference on Offshore Mechanics and Arctic Engineering - OMAE. vol. 1: Offshore Technology, OMAE2018-77660, American Society of Mechanical Engineers, International Conference on Offshore Mechanics and Arctic Engineering. Proceedings, pp. V001T01A045, 37th International Conference on Ocean, Offshore and Arctic Engineering, Madrid, Spain, 17/06/2018. https://doi.org/10.1115/OMAE2018-77660

Economic Potential of Industrializing Floating Wind Turbine Foundations. / Andersen, Morten Thøtt; Tetu, Amélie; Stiesdal, Henrik.

ASME 2018 Proceedings of the 37th International Conference on Offshore Mechanics and Arctic Engineering - OMAE. Vol. 1: Offshore Technology American Society of Mechanical Engineers, 2018. p. V001T01A045 OMAE2018-77660 (International Conference on Offshore Mechanics and Arctic Engineering. Proceedings).

Research output: Contribution to book/anthology/report/conference proceedingArticle in proceedingResearchpeer-review

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AU - Andersen, Morten Thøtt

AU - Tetu, Amélie

AU - Stiesdal, Henrik

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AB - The potential of offshore wind is enormous. It could meet Europes electric energy demand seven times over, and the United States energy demand four times over. However, much of the offshore potential is at water depths that can only be served by floating systems. In order to truly enable floating offshore wind, the cost of energy needs to reach the level of fixed-bottom offshore wind. At the present time, a number of suppliers are offering floating offshore wind foundations, but at cost levels that are prohibitive for large-scale application. The root cause of the high cost levels is that existing designs have emerged from the offshore oil and gas sector; they are manufactured using conventional, non-industrialized methods, weights are measured in thousands of tons and manufacturing times are measured in months. In contrast, the TetraSpar concept is based on the application of proven design and manufacturing technologies from the highly competitive wind industry. As a result, the weight is only a fraction of the weight of other floating wind turbine foundations, manufacturing takes place in factories using industrialized methods, and assembly and installation is measured in days or weeks, not months. The foundation and wind turbine can be installed in any port of a reasonable size using a standard, land-based crane, and the complete assembly can be towed to site and hooked up to the moorings and the electrical cable using standard tugs. This paper presents how these desirable economic traits of the TetraSpar design are achievable, and how the near future feasibility of offshore floating wind turbines may develop as a consequence of this radical change in cost levels.

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U2 - 10.1115/OMAE2018-77660

DO - 10.1115/OMAE2018-77660

M3 - Article in proceeding

VL - 1: Offshore Technology

T3 - International Conference on Offshore Mechanics and Arctic Engineering. Proceedings

SP - V001T01A045

BT - ASME 2018 Proceedings of the 37th International Conference on Offshore Mechanics and Arctic Engineering - OMAE

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Andersen MT, Tetu A, Stiesdal H. Economic Potential of Industrializing Floating Wind Turbine Foundations. In ASME 2018 Proceedings of the 37th International Conference on Offshore Mechanics and Arctic Engineering - OMAE. Vol. 1: Offshore Technology. American Society of Mechanical Engineers. 2018. p. V001T01A045. OMAE2018-77660. (International Conference on Offshore Mechanics and Arctic Engineering. Proceedings). https://doi.org/10.1115/OMAE2018-77660