Edible North: Metabolizing the Scandinavian Issuescape Through Turnips and Terroirs

Research output: Contribution to book/anthology/report/conference proceedingConference abstract in proceedingResearchpeer-review

Abstract

With the publication of the Manifesto for a New Nordic Cuisine in 2004, the gastronomic potentials of the Scandinavian flora and fauna became the basis for a social innovation project with ambitions far beyond fine dining and select produce. Since then New Nordic Food has become a key platform for articulating concerns about (and discuss solutions for) more divisive or contentious topics like the lack of development in peripheral Scandinavia, the relationship between diet and disease, or the sustainability of our food production system. From an STS perspective it is interesting to contemplate how the ‘bodily registers’ (Latour 2004, Despret 2004) of these issues change as they become, quite literally, digestible and ‘metabolized’
(Whatmore & Stassart 2004) through their partial mergers with the New Nordic Food agenda. Like so many other contemporary concerns, New Nordic Food brings to the fore our relationship with both the natural and the bodily, except here as a promising
and comforting rather than a threatening and uncertain liaison. When the Nordic landscapes and their flora and fauna become in this way ‘the stuff of politics’ (Braun & Whatmore 2010), it warrants an exploration of both their co-constitutive role in the
formation of publics (Marres 2007) and the ways in which they are themselves reconfigured as ‘matters of concern’ (Latour 2003) in this process. I draw on digital cartographies and fieldwork carried out under the Carlsberg funded project Edible North: Mapping the ’New Nordic Food’ phenomenon, its diffusion, development and socio-technical variation.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication4S/EASST 2012 : Design and Displacement
PublisherSociety for Social Studies of Science
Publication date2012
Publication statusPublished - 2012
EventAnnual Meeting of the Society for Social Studies of Science (4S): Design and displacement – social studies of science and technology - CBS, København, Denmark
Duration: 17 Oct 201220 Oct 2012
http://www.4sonline.org/meeting/12

Conference

ConferenceAnnual Meeting of the Society for Social Studies of Science (4S)
LocationCBS
CountryDenmark
CityKøbenhavn
Period17/10/201220/10/2012
Internet address

Fingerprint

food
Scandinavia
merger
sustainability
innovation
Disease
politics
lack

Keywords

  • sts
  • food & culture
  • digital methods
  • controversy mapping
  • issue mapping
  • issue publics
  • web cartography

Cite this

Munk, A. K. (2012). Edible North: Metabolizing the Scandinavian Issuescape Through Turnips and Terroirs. In 4S/EASST 2012: Design and Displacement Society for Social Studies of Science.
Munk, Anders Kristian. / Edible North : Metabolizing the Scandinavian Issuescape Through Turnips and Terroirs. 4S/EASST 2012: Design and Displacement. Society for Social Studies of Science, 2012.
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Munk, AK 2012, Edible North: Metabolizing the Scandinavian Issuescape Through Turnips and Terroirs. in 4S/EASST 2012: Design and Displacement. Society for Social Studies of Science, København, Denmark, 17/10/2012.

Edible North : Metabolizing the Scandinavian Issuescape Through Turnips and Terroirs. / Munk, Anders Kristian.

4S/EASST 2012: Design and Displacement. Society for Social Studies of Science, 2012.

Research output: Contribution to book/anthology/report/conference proceedingConference abstract in proceedingResearchpeer-review

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AB - With the publication of the Manifesto for a New Nordic Cuisine in 2004, the gastronomic potentials of the Scandinavian flora and fauna became the basis for a social innovation project with ambitions far beyond fine dining and select produce. Since then New Nordic Food has become a key platform for articulating concerns about (and discuss solutions for) more divisive or contentious topics like the lack of development in peripheral Scandinavia, the relationship between diet and disease, or the sustainability of our food production system. From an STS perspective it is interesting to contemplate how the ‘bodily registers’ (Latour 2004, Despret 2004) of these issues change as they become, quite literally, digestible and ‘metabolized’ (Whatmore & Stassart 2004) through their partial mergers with the New Nordic Food agenda. Like so many other contemporary concerns, New Nordic Food brings to the fore our relationship with both the natural and the bodily, except here as a promising and comforting rather than a threatening and uncertain liaison. When the Nordic landscapes and their flora and fauna become in this way ‘the stuff of politics’ (Braun & Whatmore 2010), it warrants an exploration of both their co-constitutive role in the formation of publics (Marres 2007) and the ways in which they are themselves reconfigured as ‘matters of concern’ (Latour 2003) in this process. I draw on digital cartographies and fieldwork carried out under the Carlsberg funded project Edible North: Mapping the ’New Nordic Food’ phenomenon, its diffusion, development and socio-technical variation.

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Munk AK. Edible North: Metabolizing the Scandinavian Issuescape Through Turnips and Terroirs. In 4S/EASST 2012: Design and Displacement. Society for Social Studies of Science. 2012