Effects of Vibrotactile Stimulation During Virtual Sandboarding

Stine Lind, Lui Thomsen, Mie Egebjerg, Niels Chr. Nilsson, Rolf Nordahl, Stefania Serafin

Research output: Contribution to book/anthology/report/conference proceedingArticle in proceedingResearchpeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

This poster details a within-subjects study (n=17) investigating the effects of vibrotactile stimulation on illusory self-motion, presence and perceived realism during an interactive sandboarding simulation. Vibrotactile feedback was delivered using a low frequency audio transducer mounted underneath the board. The study compared three conditions: no vibration, constant vibration and dynamic vibration. The results suggest that constant vibrotactile feedback led to significantly more compelling self-motion illusions and a higher degree of perceived realism, than the condition devoid of vibrotactile feedback. No significant differences were found between the two conditions involving vibrotactile stimulation.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationVirtual Reality (VR) 2016
PublisherIEEE
Publication date2016
ISBN (Electronic)978-1-5090-0836-0
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016
EventIEEE Virtual Reality 2016 - Greenville, SC, United States
Duration: 18 Mar 201623 Mar 2016
http://ieeevr.org/2016/

Conference

ConferenceIEEE Virtual Reality 2016
CountryUnited States
CityGreenville, SC
Period18/03/201623/03/2016
Internet address

Fingerprint

Feedback
Transducers

Cite this

Lind, Stine ; Thomsen, Lui ; Egebjerg, Mie ; Nilsson, Niels Chr. ; Nordahl, Rolf ; Serafin, Stefania. / Effects of Vibrotactile Stimulation During Virtual Sandboarding. Virtual Reality (VR) 2016. IEEE, 2016.
@inproceedings{6b4f1a67720342b8a0dc1b7bc195d4f1,
title = "Effects of Vibrotactile Stimulation During Virtual Sandboarding",
abstract = "This poster details a within-subjects study (n=17) investigating the effects of vibrotactile stimulation on illusory self-motion, presence and perceived realism during an interactive sandboarding simulation. Vibrotactile feedback was delivered using a low frequency audio transducer mounted underneath the board. The study compared three conditions: no vibration, constant vibration and dynamic vibration. The results suggest that constant vibrotactile feedback led to significantly more compelling self-motion illusions and a higher degree of perceived realism, than the condition devoid of vibrotactile feedback. No significant differences were found between the two conditions involving vibrotactile stimulation.",
author = "Stine Lind and Lui Thomsen and Mie Egebjerg and Nilsson, {Niels Chr.} and Rolf Nordahl and Stefania Serafin",
year = "2016",
doi = "10.1109/VR.2016.7504732",
language = "English",
booktitle = "Virtual Reality (VR) 2016",
publisher = "IEEE",
address = "United States",

}

Lind, S, Thomsen, L, Egebjerg, M, Nilsson, NC, Nordahl, R & Serafin, S 2016, Effects of Vibrotactile Stimulation During Virtual Sandboarding. in Virtual Reality (VR) 2016. IEEE, IEEE Virtual Reality 2016, Greenville, SC, United States, 18/03/2016. https://doi.org/10.1109/VR.2016.7504732

Effects of Vibrotactile Stimulation During Virtual Sandboarding. / Lind, Stine; Thomsen, Lui; Egebjerg, Mie; Nilsson, Niels Chr.; Nordahl, Rolf; Serafin, Stefania.

Virtual Reality (VR) 2016. IEEE, 2016.

Research output: Contribution to book/anthology/report/conference proceedingArticle in proceedingResearchpeer-review

TY - GEN

T1 - Effects of Vibrotactile Stimulation During Virtual Sandboarding

AU - Lind, Stine

AU - Thomsen, Lui

AU - Egebjerg, Mie

AU - Nilsson, Niels Chr.

AU - Nordahl, Rolf

AU - Serafin, Stefania

PY - 2016

Y1 - 2016

N2 - This poster details a within-subjects study (n=17) investigating the effects of vibrotactile stimulation on illusory self-motion, presence and perceived realism during an interactive sandboarding simulation. Vibrotactile feedback was delivered using a low frequency audio transducer mounted underneath the board. The study compared three conditions: no vibration, constant vibration and dynamic vibration. The results suggest that constant vibrotactile feedback led to significantly more compelling self-motion illusions and a higher degree of perceived realism, than the condition devoid of vibrotactile feedback. No significant differences were found between the two conditions involving vibrotactile stimulation.

AB - This poster details a within-subjects study (n=17) investigating the effects of vibrotactile stimulation on illusory self-motion, presence and perceived realism during an interactive sandboarding simulation. Vibrotactile feedback was delivered using a low frequency audio transducer mounted underneath the board. The study compared three conditions: no vibration, constant vibration and dynamic vibration. The results suggest that constant vibrotactile feedback led to significantly more compelling self-motion illusions and a higher degree of perceived realism, than the condition devoid of vibrotactile feedback. No significant differences were found between the two conditions involving vibrotactile stimulation.

U2 - 10.1109/VR.2016.7504732

DO - 10.1109/VR.2016.7504732

M3 - Article in proceeding

BT - Virtual Reality (VR) 2016

PB - IEEE

ER -