Exploring employee participation and work environment in hotels: Case studies from Denmark and New Zealand

Raymond Markey, Candice Harris, Herman Knudsen, Jens Lind, David Williamson

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

We explore the relative impact of direct and representative forms of participation on quality of the work environment, based on multi-method case studies of two hotels each in New Zealand and Denmark. The degree of direct participation is higher at the New Zealand hotels, yet, workload and stress is higher than in the Danish ones. This confirms literature that questions whether participation is always beneficial to the work environment. On the other hand, representative forms of participation appear to offer greater opportunities for a better quality of work environment (QWE) since Danish employees in this study enjoy greater influence through collective bargaining and cooperation committees, and experience less workload stress than the New Zealanders.
Original languageEnglish
JournalNew Zealand Journal of Employment Relations (Online)
Volume39
Issue number1
Pages (from-to)2-20
ISSN1179-2965
Publication statusPublished - 2014

Cite this

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Exploring employee participation and work environment in hotels : Case studies from Denmark and New Zealand. / Markey, Raymond; Harris, Candice; Knudsen, Herman; Lind, Jens; Williamson, David.

In: New Zealand Journal of Employment Relations (Online), Vol. 39, No. 1, 2014, p. 2-20.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Exploring employee participation and work environment in hotels

T2 - Case studies from Denmark and New Zealand

AU - Markey, Raymond

AU - Harris, Candice

AU - Knudsen, Herman

AU - Lind, Jens

AU - Williamson, David

PY - 2014

Y1 - 2014

N2 - We explore the relative impact of direct and representative forms of participation on quality of the work environment, based on multi-method case studies of two hotels each in New Zealand and Denmark. The degree of direct participation is higher at the New Zealand hotels, yet, workload and stress is higher than in the Danish ones. This confirms literature that questions whether participation is always beneficial to the work environment. On the other hand, representative forms of participation appear to offer greater opportunities for a better quality of work environment (QWE) since Danish employees in this study enjoy greater influence through collective bargaining and cooperation committees, and experience less workload stress than the New Zealanders.

AB - We explore the relative impact of direct and representative forms of participation on quality of the work environment, based on multi-method case studies of two hotels each in New Zealand and Denmark. The degree of direct participation is higher at the New Zealand hotels, yet, workload and stress is higher than in the Danish ones. This confirms literature that questions whether participation is always beneficial to the work environment. On the other hand, representative forms of participation appear to offer greater opportunities for a better quality of work environment (QWE) since Danish employees in this study enjoy greater influence through collective bargaining and cooperation committees, and experience less workload stress than the New Zealanders.

M3 - Journal article

VL - 39

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EP - 20

JO - New Zealand Journal of Employment Relations (Online)

JF - New Zealand Journal of Employment Relations (Online)

SN - 1179-2965

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