Exploring groups of simulated gambling behavior: A typological study among Danish adolescents

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Abstract

Using cluster analysis techniques, this study examined the differences and similarities in simulated gambling involvement in a sample of Danish adolescents. The data was collected through a survey of simulated gambling behaviour among a representative sample of Danish adolescents aged 12–16 (n = 755). A hierarchical cluster analysis resulted in three groups of young simulated gamblers: Occasional simulated gamblers (67.7%), involved simulated gamblers (15.7%), and potentially disordered simulated gamblers (16.6%). The occasional simulated gamblers group was characterized by a low level of simulated gambling involvement, occasional play with no monetary investment, and no signs of problematic gaming. The involved and potentially disordered simulated gambler groups showed higher degrees of involvement in simulated gambling, with the potentially disordered simulated gamblers showing a higher play frequency and a higher risk of problematic gaming and of monetary gambling problems. These indications of heterogeneity may serve as a starting point for further analyses of groups of young simulated gamblers, as the identified groups need further testing and refinement with representative data from other jurisdictions and the integration of supplementary variables. The main findings carry implications for policy and intervention, as the subgroups of simulated gamblers may assist in identifying those young people who are most at risk for developing gambling-related problems.

Original languageEnglish
JournalInternational Gambling Studies
ISSN1445-9795
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019

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gambling
adolescent
Group
cluster analysis
jurisdiction
indication

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@article{bf8f3bb360b7409f8f4dacb5c49d4c33,
title = "Exploring groups of simulated gambling behavior: A typological study among Danish adolescents",
abstract = "Using cluster analysis techniques, this study examined the differences and similarities in simulated gambling involvement in a sample of Danish adolescents. The data was collected through a survey of simulated gambling behaviour among a representative sample of Danish adolescents aged 12–16 (n = 755). A hierarchical cluster analysis resulted in three groups of young simulated gamblers: Occasional simulated gamblers (67.7{\%}), involved simulated gamblers (15.7{\%}), and potentially disordered simulated gamblers (16.6{\%}). The occasional simulated gamblers group was characterized by a low level of simulated gambling involvement, occasional play with no monetary investment, and no signs of problematic gaming. The involved and potentially disordered simulated gambler groups showed higher degrees of involvement in simulated gambling, with the potentially disordered simulated gamblers showing a higher play frequency and a higher risk of problematic gaming and of monetary gambling problems. These indications of heterogeneity may serve as a starting point for further analyses of groups of young simulated gamblers, as the identified groups need further testing and refinement with representative data from other jurisdictions and the integration of supplementary variables. The main findings carry implications for policy and intervention, as the subgroups of simulated gamblers may assist in identifying those young people who are most at risk for developing gambling-related problems.",
author = "Kristiansen, {S{\o}ren Ginnerup} and Severin, {Majbritt Christine}",
year = "2019",
doi = "https://doi.org/10.1080/14459795.2019.1697344",
language = "English",
journal = "International Gambling Studies",
issn = "1445-9795",
publisher = "Routledge",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Exploring groups of simulated gambling behavior: A typological study among Danish adolescents

AU - Kristiansen, Søren Ginnerup

AU - Severin, Majbritt Christine

PY - 2019

Y1 - 2019

N2 - Using cluster analysis techniques, this study examined the differences and similarities in simulated gambling involvement in a sample of Danish adolescents. The data was collected through a survey of simulated gambling behaviour among a representative sample of Danish adolescents aged 12–16 (n = 755). A hierarchical cluster analysis resulted in three groups of young simulated gamblers: Occasional simulated gamblers (67.7%), involved simulated gamblers (15.7%), and potentially disordered simulated gamblers (16.6%). The occasional simulated gamblers group was characterized by a low level of simulated gambling involvement, occasional play with no monetary investment, and no signs of problematic gaming. The involved and potentially disordered simulated gambler groups showed higher degrees of involvement in simulated gambling, with the potentially disordered simulated gamblers showing a higher play frequency and a higher risk of problematic gaming and of monetary gambling problems. These indications of heterogeneity may serve as a starting point for further analyses of groups of young simulated gamblers, as the identified groups need further testing and refinement with representative data from other jurisdictions and the integration of supplementary variables. The main findings carry implications for policy and intervention, as the subgroups of simulated gamblers may assist in identifying those young people who are most at risk for developing gambling-related problems.

AB - Using cluster analysis techniques, this study examined the differences and similarities in simulated gambling involvement in a sample of Danish adolescents. The data was collected through a survey of simulated gambling behaviour among a representative sample of Danish adolescents aged 12–16 (n = 755). A hierarchical cluster analysis resulted in three groups of young simulated gamblers: Occasional simulated gamblers (67.7%), involved simulated gamblers (15.7%), and potentially disordered simulated gamblers (16.6%). The occasional simulated gamblers group was characterized by a low level of simulated gambling involvement, occasional play with no monetary investment, and no signs of problematic gaming. The involved and potentially disordered simulated gambler groups showed higher degrees of involvement in simulated gambling, with the potentially disordered simulated gamblers showing a higher play frequency and a higher risk of problematic gaming and of monetary gambling problems. These indications of heterogeneity may serve as a starting point for further analyses of groups of young simulated gamblers, as the identified groups need further testing and refinement with representative data from other jurisdictions and the integration of supplementary variables. The main findings carry implications for policy and intervention, as the subgroups of simulated gamblers may assist in identifying those young people who are most at risk for developing gambling-related problems.

U2 - https://doi.org/10.1080/14459795.2019.1697344

DO - https://doi.org/10.1080/14459795.2019.1697344

M3 - Journal article

JO - International Gambling Studies

JF - International Gambling Studies

SN - 1445-9795

ER -