Exposure to ultrafine particles in relation to indoor events and dwelling characteristics

Michal Spilak, Marie Frederiksen, Barbara Kolarik, Lars Gunnarsen

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Exposure to ultrafine particles (UFP) in homes is associated with health risks such as cardiovascular disease and/or respiratory problems. These risks are heightened by the long time that people spend indoors. Therefore reducing the particle concentration in homes leads to improved health among its occupants. The use of particle filtration units may be an effective way of reducing UFP indoors.
The purpose of this study was to evaluate associations between UFP concentrations and dwelling characteristics, estimate UFP removal rates indoors and to assess the effectiveness of installed particle filtration units.
In a randomised cross-over design in 27 homes, we ran the particle filtration units for two periods, each lasting two weeks with and without the inclusion of a HEPA filter.
By using the particle filtration units in dwellings, we achieved a 57% reduction of the UFP concentration and the removal rate was increased from 0.33 h-1 to 1.94 h-1. We found human activities to be far more relevant to high UFP concentrations than dwelling characteristics. Window–opening habits reduce exposure to UFP during peaks caused by occupant behaviour and increase exposure to UFP during low indoor activity. Furthermore, the winter season was associated significantly with high UFP levels indoors. Results of our study also indicated that owning a pet, wood-type floors and floor levels close to the ground are associated with increased UFP levels.
Original languageEnglish
JournalBuilding and Environment
Volume74
Issue numberApril
Pages (from-to)65-74
Number of pages10
ISSN0360-1323
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2014

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Health risks
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habits
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Health
Disease
health
particle
dwelling
exposure
cardiovascular disease
time
human activity
filter
winter

Cite this

Spilak, Michal ; Frederiksen, Marie ; Kolarik, Barbara ; Gunnarsen, Lars. / Exposure to ultrafine particles in relation to indoor events and dwelling characteristics. In: Building and Environment. 2014 ; Vol. 74, No. April. pp. 65-74.
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title = "Exposure to ultrafine particles in relation to indoor events and dwelling characteristics",
abstract = "Exposure to ultrafine particles (UFP) in homes is associated with health risks such as cardiovascular disease and/or respiratory problems. These risks are heightened by the long time that people spend indoors. Therefore reducing the particle concentration in homes leads to improved health among its occupants. The use of particle filtration units may be an effective way of reducing UFP indoors.The purpose of this study was to evaluate associations between UFP concentrations and dwelling characteristics, estimate UFP removal rates indoors and to assess the effectiveness of installed particle filtration units.In a randomised cross-over design in 27 homes, we ran the particle filtration units for two periods, each lasting two weeks with and without the inclusion of a HEPA filter.By using the particle filtration units in dwellings, we achieved a 57{\%} reduction of the UFP concentration and the removal rate was increased from 0.33 h-1 to 1.94 h-1. We found human activities to be far more relevant to high UFP concentrations than dwelling characteristics. Window–opening habits reduce exposure to UFP during peaks caused by occupant behaviour and increase exposure to UFP during low indoor activity. Furthermore, the winter season was associated significantly with high UFP levels indoors. Results of our study also indicated that owning a pet, wood-type floors and floor levels close to the ground are associated with increased UFP levels.",
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Exposure to ultrafine particles in relation to indoor events and dwelling characteristics. / Spilak, Michal; Frederiksen, Marie; Kolarik, Barbara; Gunnarsen, Lars.

In: Building and Environment, Vol. 74, No. April, 04.2014, p. 65-74.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Exposure to ultrafine particles in relation to indoor events and dwelling characteristics

AU - Spilak, Michal

AU - Frederiksen, Marie

AU - Kolarik, Barbara

AU - Gunnarsen, Lars

PY - 2014/4

Y1 - 2014/4

N2 - Exposure to ultrafine particles (UFP) in homes is associated with health risks such as cardiovascular disease and/or respiratory problems. These risks are heightened by the long time that people spend indoors. Therefore reducing the particle concentration in homes leads to improved health among its occupants. The use of particle filtration units may be an effective way of reducing UFP indoors.The purpose of this study was to evaluate associations between UFP concentrations and dwelling characteristics, estimate UFP removal rates indoors and to assess the effectiveness of installed particle filtration units.In a randomised cross-over design in 27 homes, we ran the particle filtration units for two periods, each lasting two weeks with and without the inclusion of a HEPA filter.By using the particle filtration units in dwellings, we achieved a 57% reduction of the UFP concentration and the removal rate was increased from 0.33 h-1 to 1.94 h-1. We found human activities to be far more relevant to high UFP concentrations than dwelling characteristics. Window–opening habits reduce exposure to UFP during peaks caused by occupant behaviour and increase exposure to UFP during low indoor activity. Furthermore, the winter season was associated significantly with high UFP levels indoors. Results of our study also indicated that owning a pet, wood-type floors and floor levels close to the ground are associated with increased UFP levels.

AB - Exposure to ultrafine particles (UFP) in homes is associated with health risks such as cardiovascular disease and/or respiratory problems. These risks are heightened by the long time that people spend indoors. Therefore reducing the particle concentration in homes leads to improved health among its occupants. The use of particle filtration units may be an effective way of reducing UFP indoors.The purpose of this study was to evaluate associations between UFP concentrations and dwelling characteristics, estimate UFP removal rates indoors and to assess the effectiveness of installed particle filtration units.In a randomised cross-over design in 27 homes, we ran the particle filtration units for two periods, each lasting two weeks with and without the inclusion of a HEPA filter.By using the particle filtration units in dwellings, we achieved a 57% reduction of the UFP concentration and the removal rate was increased from 0.33 h-1 to 1.94 h-1. We found human activities to be far more relevant to high UFP concentrations than dwelling characteristics. Window–opening habits reduce exposure to UFP during peaks caused by occupant behaviour and increase exposure to UFP during low indoor activity. Furthermore, the winter season was associated significantly with high UFP levels indoors. Results of our study also indicated that owning a pet, wood-type floors and floor levels close to the ground are associated with increased UFP levels.

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