Faecal microbiota transplantation from patients with depression or healthy individuals into rats modulates mood-related behaviour

Julie Kristine Knudsen, Thomas Yssing Michaelsen, Caspar Bundgaard-Nielsen, René Ernst Nielsen, Simon Hjerrild, Peter Leutscher, Gregers Wegener, Suzette Sørensen*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

9 Citations (Scopus)
17 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Differences in gut microbiota composition have been observed in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) compared to healthy individuals. Here, we investigated if faecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) from patients with MDD into rats could induce a depressive-like phenotype. We performed FMT from patients with MDD (FMT-MDD) and healthy individuals (FMT-Healthy) into male Flinders Sensitive Line (FSL) and Flinders Resistant Line (FRL) rats and assessed depressive-like behaviour. No behavioural differences were observed in the FSL rats. In FRL rats, the FMT-Healthy group displayed significantly less depressive-like behaviour than the FMT-MDD group. However, there was no difference in behaviour between FMT-MDD FRL rats and negative controls, indicating that FMT-Healthy FRL rats received beneficial bacteria. We additionally found different taxa between the FMT-MDD and the FMT-Healthy FRL rats, which could be traced to the donors. Four taxa, three belonging to the family Ruminococcaceae and the genus Lachnospira, were significantly elevated in relative abundance in FMT-MDD rats, while the genus Coprococcus was depleted. In this study, the FMT-MDD group was different from the FMT-Healthy group based on behaviour and intestinal taxa.

Original languageEnglish
Article number21869
JournalScientific Reports
Volume11
Issue number1
ISSN2045-2322
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2021

Bibliographical note

© 2021. The Author(s).

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