Formation of surface nanostructures on rutile (TiO2): comparative study of low-energy cluster ion and high-energy monoatomic ion impact

Vladimir Popok, Jens Jensen, Sasa Vuckovic, Anna Mackova, Christina Trautmann

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

15 Citations (Scopus)
31 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

The formation of nanostructures on rutile (TiO2) surfaces formed after the implantation of keV-energy Ar+ cluster ions and MeV- to GeV-energy multiply-charged heavy ions (Iq+, Taq+ and Uq+) is studied. Despite the differences in stopping and energy transfer mechanisms between the keV-energy cluster ions and MeV-energy monoatomic ions, their impacts lead to similar type of surface damage – craters. For the cluster ion implantation the craters are caused by the multiple-collision effect (dominated by nuclear stopping) and the high density of energy and momentum transferred to the target, while for the case of MeV multiply-charged ions the craters are probably formed due to the Coulomb explosion and fast energy transfer caused by the electronic stopping. At ion energies in the GeV range, nanosize protrusions, so-called hillocks are observed on the surface. It is suggested that electronic stopping leads to the formation of continuous tracks and the transferred energy is high enough to melt the material along whole projectile path. Elastic rebound of the tension between the molten and solid state phases leads to liquid flow, expansion and quenching of the melt thus forming the hillocks. The atomic force microscopy measurements carried out in different environmental conditions (temperature and atmosphere) suggesting that the damaged material at the nanosize impact spots has very different water affinity properties (higher hydrophilicity or water adsorption) compared to the non-irradiated rutile surface.
Original languageEnglish
Article number205303
JournalJournal of Physics D: Applied Physics
Volume42
Issue number20
Number of pages6
ISSN0022-3727
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 24 Sep 2009
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

ion impact
rutile
Nanostructures
Ions
stopping
craters
ions
Ion implantation
Energy transfer
energy
Heavy Ions
Water
Hydrophilicity
energy transfer
Projectiles
Heavy ions
Explosions
Molten materials
Quenching
Atomic force microscopy

Cite this

@article{79e06ba6ceac465c9efc03cbca071c2c,
title = "Formation of surface nanostructures on rutile (TiO2): comparative study of low-energy cluster ion and high-energy monoatomic ion impact",
abstract = "The formation of nanostructures on rutile (TiO2) surfaces formed after the implantation of keV-energy Ar+ cluster ions and MeV- to GeV-energy multiply-charged heavy ions (Iq+, Taq+ and Uq+) is studied. Despite the differences in stopping and energy transfer mechanisms between the keV-energy cluster ions and MeV-energy monoatomic ions, their impacts lead to similar type of surface damage – craters. For the cluster ion implantation the craters are caused by the multiple-collision effect (dominated by nuclear stopping) and the high density of energy and momentum transferred to the target, while for the case of MeV multiply-charged ions the craters are probably formed due to the Coulomb explosion and fast energy transfer caused by the electronic stopping. At ion energies in the GeV range, nanosize protrusions, so-called hillocks are observed on the surface. It is suggested that electronic stopping leads to the formation of continuous tracks and the transferred energy is high enough to melt the material along whole projectile path. Elastic rebound of the tension between the molten and solid state phases leads to liquid flow, expansion and quenching of the melt thus forming the hillocks. The atomic force microscopy measurements carried out in different environmental conditions (temperature and atmosphere) suggesting that the damaged material at the nanosize impact spots has very different water affinity properties (higher hydrophilicity or water adsorption) compared to the non-irradiated rutile surface.",
author = "Vladimir Popok and Jens Jensen and Sasa Vuckovic and Anna Mackova and Christina Trautmann",
year = "2009",
month = "9",
day = "24",
doi = "10.1088/0022-3727/42/20/205303",
language = "English",
volume = "42",
journal = "Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics",
issn = "0022-3727",
publisher = "IOP Publishing",
number = "20",

}

Formation of surface nanostructures on rutile (TiO2): comparative study of low-energy cluster ion and high-energy monoatomic ion impact. / Popok, Vladimir; Jensen, Jens; Vuckovic, Sasa; Mackova, Anna; Trautmann, Christina.

In: Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics, Vol. 42, No. 20, 205303, 24.09.2009.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Formation of surface nanostructures on rutile (TiO2): comparative study of low-energy cluster ion and high-energy monoatomic ion impact

AU - Popok, Vladimir

AU - Jensen, Jens

AU - Vuckovic, Sasa

AU - Mackova, Anna

AU - Trautmann, Christina

PY - 2009/9/24

Y1 - 2009/9/24

N2 - The formation of nanostructures on rutile (TiO2) surfaces formed after the implantation of keV-energy Ar+ cluster ions and MeV- to GeV-energy multiply-charged heavy ions (Iq+, Taq+ and Uq+) is studied. Despite the differences in stopping and energy transfer mechanisms between the keV-energy cluster ions and MeV-energy monoatomic ions, their impacts lead to similar type of surface damage – craters. For the cluster ion implantation the craters are caused by the multiple-collision effect (dominated by nuclear stopping) and the high density of energy and momentum transferred to the target, while for the case of MeV multiply-charged ions the craters are probably formed due to the Coulomb explosion and fast energy transfer caused by the electronic stopping. At ion energies in the GeV range, nanosize protrusions, so-called hillocks are observed on the surface. It is suggested that electronic stopping leads to the formation of continuous tracks and the transferred energy is high enough to melt the material along whole projectile path. Elastic rebound of the tension between the molten and solid state phases leads to liquid flow, expansion and quenching of the melt thus forming the hillocks. The atomic force microscopy measurements carried out in different environmental conditions (temperature and atmosphere) suggesting that the damaged material at the nanosize impact spots has very different water affinity properties (higher hydrophilicity or water adsorption) compared to the non-irradiated rutile surface.

AB - The formation of nanostructures on rutile (TiO2) surfaces formed after the implantation of keV-energy Ar+ cluster ions and MeV- to GeV-energy multiply-charged heavy ions (Iq+, Taq+ and Uq+) is studied. Despite the differences in stopping and energy transfer mechanisms between the keV-energy cluster ions and MeV-energy monoatomic ions, their impacts lead to similar type of surface damage – craters. For the cluster ion implantation the craters are caused by the multiple-collision effect (dominated by nuclear stopping) and the high density of energy and momentum transferred to the target, while for the case of MeV multiply-charged ions the craters are probably formed due to the Coulomb explosion and fast energy transfer caused by the electronic stopping. At ion energies in the GeV range, nanosize protrusions, so-called hillocks are observed on the surface. It is suggested that electronic stopping leads to the formation of continuous tracks and the transferred energy is high enough to melt the material along whole projectile path. Elastic rebound of the tension between the molten and solid state phases leads to liquid flow, expansion and quenching of the melt thus forming the hillocks. The atomic force microscopy measurements carried out in different environmental conditions (temperature and atmosphere) suggesting that the damaged material at the nanosize impact spots has very different water affinity properties (higher hydrophilicity or water adsorption) compared to the non-irradiated rutile surface.

U2 - 10.1088/0022-3727/42/20/205303

DO - 10.1088/0022-3727/42/20/205303

M3 - Journal article

VL - 42

JO - Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics

JF - Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics

SN - 0022-3727

IS - 20

M1 - 205303

ER -