Genetic and demographic history define a conservation strategy for earth’s most endangered pinniped, the Mediterranean monk seal Monachus monachus

Alexandros A. Karamanlidis*, Tomaž Skrbinšek, George Amato, Panagiotis Dendrinos, Stephen Gaughran, Panagiotis Kasapidis, Alexander Kopatz, Astrid Vik Stronen

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

5 Citations (Scopus)
Original languageEnglish
Article number373
JournalScientific Reports
Volume11
Issue number1
ISSN2045-2322
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 11 Jan 2021
Externally publishedYes

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This study was conducted in accordance with the guidelines of research permits issued by the Hellenic Ministry of Energy and Environment. Financial support for sample collection and laboratory analysis was provided partially by the LIFE Nature projects LIFE05NAT/GR/000083 and “Cyclades LIFE: Integrated monk seal conservation in Northern Cyclades” (LIFE12NAT/GR/000688) and by two research grants (Grant Nr.: E4061725, MMC13-136) from the Marine Mammal Commission of the USA to MOm/Hellenic Society for the Study and Protection of the Monk Seal (Principal Investigator: AAK). AVS was supported by a senior postdoctoral fellowship from Insubria University, Italy.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2021, The Author(s).

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