Assessing use-use interactions at sea: A theoretical framework for spatial decision support tools facilitating co-location in maritime spatial planning

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

The space occupied by traditional and new human-based marine uses at sea is expanding, creating a need for developing methods to assess interactions between co-located uses in maritime spatial planning (MSP). However, no clear terminology for use-use interactions exists. Thus, an analytical framework for spatial decision support tools (DSTs) to assess use-use interactions is deduced from literature. Four spatial-temporal links are found to either alone or together constitute use-use interactions: location links, environmental links, technical links, and user attraction links. It is found to be important for DSTs to support co-location management in MSP by iteratively through the MSP process 1) spatially-temporally locate spatial-temporal links constituting use-use interactions, 2) list conflicts and synergies of the located use-use interactions, and 3) weight the conflicts and synergies. With this analytical framework, two types of DSTs are analysed for their ability to include co-location; matrix- and ranking-based DSTs to detect conflicts and synergies and space allocating DSTs to avoid/minimise conflicts and optimise synergies. Whereas the first group of tools categorise or rank use-use combinations, the latter group use information about which multi-use combinations are possible as pre-existing knowledge, and thus the two groups of DSTs can advantageously be used together. A discrepancy is found between the co-location framework and the DSTs. It is argued that future tools could work on removing this discrepancy by considering the spatial-temporal links of use-use interactions, strengthen the focus on synergies, as well as prioritize ranking of synergies and conflicts over binary approaches that only evaluate spatial compatibility.
Translated title of the contributionHåndtering af interaktioner mellem aktiviteter på havet: En teoretisk ramme for rumlige beslutningsværktøjer der understøtter sam-lokalisering af aktiviteter i havplanlægning
Original languageEnglish
Article number103533
JournalMarine Policy
ISSN0308-597X
Publication statusPublished - 2019

Keywords

    Cite this

    @article{fac03108813e476c90a4fa3ffb5d87ed,
    title = "Assessing use-use interactions at sea: A theoretical framework for spatial decision support tools facilitating co-location in maritime spatial planning",
    abstract = "The space occupied by traditional and new human-based marine uses at sea is expanding, creating a need for developing methods to assess interactions between co-located uses in maritime spatial planning (MSP). However, no clear terminology for use-use interactions exists. Thus, an analytical framework for spatial decision support tools (DSTs) to assess use-use interactions is deduced from literature. Four spatial-temporal links are found to either alone or together constitute use-use interactions: location links, environmental links, technical links, and user attraction links. It is found to be important for DSTs to support co-location management in MSP by iteratively through the MSP process 1) spatially-temporally locate spatial-temporal links constituting use-use interactions, 2) list conflicts and synergies of the located use-use interactions, and 3) weight the conflicts and synergies. With this analytical framework, two types of DSTs are analysed for their ability to include co-location; matrix- and ranking-based DSTs to detect conflicts and synergies and space allocating DSTs to avoid/minimise conflicts and optimise synergies. Whereas the first group of tools categorise or rank use-use combinations, the latter group use information about which multi-use combinations are possible as pre-existing knowledge, and thus the two groups of DSTs can advantageously be used together. A discrepancy is found between the co-location framework and the DSTs. It is argued that future tools could work on removing this discrepancy by considering the spatial-temporal links of use-use interactions, strengthen the focus on synergies, as well as prioritize ranking of synergies and conflicts over binary approaches that only evaluate spatial compatibility.",
    keywords = "Co-location, Coexistence, Use-use interactions, Multi-use, Maritime spatial planning (MSP), Spatial decision support tools (DSTs), Geographical information systems (GIS)",
    author = "Reiter, {Ida Maria} and Hansen, {Henning Sten} and Lise Schr{\o}der",
    year = "2019",
    language = "English",
    journal = "Marine Policy",
    issn = "0308-597X",
    publisher = "Pergamon Press",

    }

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Assessing use-use interactions at sea

    T2 - A theoretical framework for spatial decision support tools facilitating co-location in maritime spatial planning

    AU - Reiter, Ida Maria

    AU - Hansen, Henning Sten

    AU - Schrøder, Lise

    PY - 2019

    Y1 - 2019

    N2 - The space occupied by traditional and new human-based marine uses at sea is expanding, creating a need for developing methods to assess interactions between co-located uses in maritime spatial planning (MSP). However, no clear terminology for use-use interactions exists. Thus, an analytical framework for spatial decision support tools (DSTs) to assess use-use interactions is deduced from literature. Four spatial-temporal links are found to either alone or together constitute use-use interactions: location links, environmental links, technical links, and user attraction links. It is found to be important for DSTs to support co-location management in MSP by iteratively through the MSP process 1) spatially-temporally locate spatial-temporal links constituting use-use interactions, 2) list conflicts and synergies of the located use-use interactions, and 3) weight the conflicts and synergies. With this analytical framework, two types of DSTs are analysed for their ability to include co-location; matrix- and ranking-based DSTs to detect conflicts and synergies and space allocating DSTs to avoid/minimise conflicts and optimise synergies. Whereas the first group of tools categorise or rank use-use combinations, the latter group use information about which multi-use combinations are possible as pre-existing knowledge, and thus the two groups of DSTs can advantageously be used together. A discrepancy is found between the co-location framework and the DSTs. It is argued that future tools could work on removing this discrepancy by considering the spatial-temporal links of use-use interactions, strengthen the focus on synergies, as well as prioritize ranking of synergies and conflicts over binary approaches that only evaluate spatial compatibility.

    AB - The space occupied by traditional and new human-based marine uses at sea is expanding, creating a need for developing methods to assess interactions between co-located uses in maritime spatial planning (MSP). However, no clear terminology for use-use interactions exists. Thus, an analytical framework for spatial decision support tools (DSTs) to assess use-use interactions is deduced from literature. Four spatial-temporal links are found to either alone or together constitute use-use interactions: location links, environmental links, technical links, and user attraction links. It is found to be important for DSTs to support co-location management in MSP by iteratively through the MSP process 1) spatially-temporally locate spatial-temporal links constituting use-use interactions, 2) list conflicts and synergies of the located use-use interactions, and 3) weight the conflicts and synergies. With this analytical framework, two types of DSTs are analysed for their ability to include co-location; matrix- and ranking-based DSTs to detect conflicts and synergies and space allocating DSTs to avoid/minimise conflicts and optimise synergies. Whereas the first group of tools categorise or rank use-use combinations, the latter group use information about which multi-use combinations are possible as pre-existing knowledge, and thus the two groups of DSTs can advantageously be used together. A discrepancy is found between the co-location framework and the DSTs. It is argued that future tools could work on removing this discrepancy by considering the spatial-temporal links of use-use interactions, strengthen the focus on synergies, as well as prioritize ranking of synergies and conflicts over binary approaches that only evaluate spatial compatibility.

    KW - Co-location

    KW - Coexistence

    KW - Use-use interactions

    KW - Multi-use

    KW - Maritime spatial planning (MSP)

    KW - Spatial decision support tools (DSTs)

    KW - Geographical information systems (GIS)

    UR - https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0308597X18306729

    M3 - Journal article

    JO - Marine Policy

    JF - Marine Policy

    SN - 0308-597X

    M1 - 103533

    ER -