How do Five American Political Science Textbooks Deal with the Economic Dimension?

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Abstract

Politics and economics interact. As a consequence, political science textbooks must often relate to the economic dimension—implicitly or explicitly. But we know very little about how these textbooks relate to economics. Are they merely unreflective customers of neoclassical economics or do they strive for a cross-disciplinary approach? An analysis of five American textbooks identifies two very different and concurrent interactions between politics and economics. The first is a theoretically conceived market economy in which market forces independently drive growth and create equilibrium, where politics has a rather secluded role. The second is the actually existing mixed economy, characterized by increased inequality, economic concentration, power, and environmental problems, influenced by a state forced to regulate. The problems of operating with such a dichotomy— and possible solutions to it — are being explored in the article.
Original languageDanish
JournalJournal of Political Science Education
Volume7
Issue number1
Pages (from-to)79-94
Number of pages16
ISSN1551-2169
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2011

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