How Reverse R&D Knowledge Transfer from Foreign Invested R&D in Emerging Markets Can Drive Global Innovation Performance

Peder Veng Søberg, Sigvald Harryson

    Research output: Contribution to book/anthology/report/conference proceedingArticle in proceedingResearchpeer-review

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    Abstract

    Although R&D globalization has happened in China, India and other rapid growth
    regions for many years, it has to our knowledge not yet been studied how it affects reverse knowledge transfer, reverse innovation, and the innovation performance of the MNCs that are driving the R&D globalization efforts. A network based theoretical framework is introduced to analyze and explain the impact of globalization of R&D on innovation performance – mainly as a result of local connectivity. Empirically, we explore four company cases to analyze the extent to which their strategic expansion of R&D activities – from Scandinavia to China – did, or did not, contribute to increased innovation performance in terms of reverse knowledge transfer and look for explanations of innovation performance in this context. Packtech moved R&D to China and immediately arranged collaboration with three selected universities, which triggered unexpected reverse knowledge transfer with immediate impact on innovation performance in distribution equipment. By contrast, Biotech did not co-operate as closely with local universities as Packtech did. In spite of this, Biotech managed to some extent to live up to its objectives in terms of
    contributions to innovation performance – partly by recruiting very senior Chinese
    researchers from the US, and partly by allowing the most promising industrial PhD
    students to rotate between China and the Scandinavian HQ. Robotech captured less innovation performance, when they transferred R&D to China. Their university
    interaction was quite monolateral, mainly based on Robotech donating equipment for university researchers to experiment with. Like Robotech, Windtech did not engage in bilateral university collaborations. One point of differentiation from all other three case companies is that Windtech took a more open collaboration approach towards other local companies – typically R&D Centers of Western leading companies in relevant industries. This open recruiting policy provided the platform for locally created innovations with global innovation impact.
    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationProceedings of the 17th International Product Development Management Conference
    PublisherEuropean Institute for Advanced Studies in Management
    Publication date2010
    Publication statusPublished - 2010
    Event17th International Product Development Management Conference -
    Duration: 13 Jun 201015 Jun 2010

    Conference

    Conference17th International Product Development Management Conference
    Period13/06/201015/06/2010
    SeriesEuropean Institute for Advanced Studies in Management Conference Proceedings Series
    ISSN1998-7374

    Fingerprint

    Innovation performance
    Emerging markets
    Knowledge transfer
    China
    Globalization
    Innovation
    Recruiting
    Biotech
    Scandinavia
    Connectivity
    Bilateral
    Industry
    Experiment
    Theoretical framework
    India

    Keywords

    • Innovation performance
    • reverse R&D knowledge transfer
    • networking
    • ambidexterity
    • sources of exploration
    • university collaboration in emerging markets

    Cite this

    Søberg, P. V., & Harryson, S. (2010). How Reverse R&D Knowledge Transfer from Foreign Invested R&D in Emerging Markets Can Drive Global Innovation Performance. In Proceedings of the 17th International Product Development Management Conference European Institute for Advanced Studies in Management. European Institute for Advanced Studies in Management Conference Proceedings Series
    Søberg, Peder Veng ; Harryson, Sigvald. / How Reverse R&D Knowledge Transfer from Foreign Invested R&D in Emerging Markets Can Drive Global Innovation Performance. Proceedings of the 17th International Product Development Management Conference . European Institute for Advanced Studies in Management, 2010. (European Institute for Advanced Studies in Management Conference Proceedings Series).
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    Søberg, PV & Harryson, S 2010, How Reverse R&D Knowledge Transfer from Foreign Invested R&D in Emerging Markets Can Drive Global Innovation Performance. in Proceedings of the 17th International Product Development Management Conference . European Institute for Advanced Studies in Management, European Institute for Advanced Studies in Management Conference Proceedings Series, 17th International Product Development Management Conference, 13/06/2010.

    How Reverse R&D Knowledge Transfer from Foreign Invested R&D in Emerging Markets Can Drive Global Innovation Performance. / Søberg, Peder Veng; Harryson, Sigvald.

    Proceedings of the 17th International Product Development Management Conference . European Institute for Advanced Studies in Management, 2010. (European Institute for Advanced Studies in Management Conference Proceedings Series).

    Research output: Contribution to book/anthology/report/conference proceedingArticle in proceedingResearchpeer-review

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    Søberg PV, Harryson S. How Reverse R&D Knowledge Transfer from Foreign Invested R&D in Emerging Markets Can Drive Global Innovation Performance. In Proceedings of the 17th International Product Development Management Conference . European Institute for Advanced Studies in Management. 2010. (European Institute for Advanced Studies in Management Conference Proceedings Series).