Human walk-to-run transition in the context of the behaviour of complex systems

M Voigt, M K Hyttel, L S Jakobsen, M K Jensen, H Balle, E A Hansen

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

This study had two main aims: 1) to investigate if the walk-to-run (WR-) transition occurs when the speed of locomotion is kept constant below the WR-transition speed (speed clamp) and the stride rate is increased monotonously using a metronome and 2) to investigate if diversion of attention and awareness from the locomotion process influences the position of the WR-transition in stride rate, stride length, and locomotion speed (SrSlLs) space. Eighteen healthy individuals (13 men and 5 women) were recruited (age: 23.9 ± 1.5 years, height: 1.77 ± 0.10 m and body mass: 77.3 ± 12.8 kg). Stride-by-stride stride rates, stride lengths, locomotion speeds, and duty factors were determined on a treadmill in 4 different tests: 1) reference WR-transition, 2) preferred walking speed, 3) dual-task test including arithmetic calculations and 4) four speed clamp bouts with different initial velocities. Walk-to-run transitions were elicited in all participants in the speed clamp bouts. When the stride rate ramp was clamped at preferred walking speed the WR-transition stride rate was not significantly different from the WR-transition stride rate during the reference test (t = 2.2, p = 0.312). However, in the SrSlLs space the speed clamp WR-transitions all deviated from the position of the reference WR-transition. Additionally, it was demonstrated that intensive attentional diversion using a dual-task paradigm had very little influence on the position of the WR-transition in the SrSlLs space. It is argued that these observations can be explained in the context of the behavior of complex systems.

Original languageEnglish
Article number102509
JournalHuman Movement Science
Volume67
ISSN0167-9457
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Oct 2019

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Locomotion
Architectural Accessibility
Body Height

Keywords

  • Behavioural attractors
  • Bi-pedal gait
  • Gait transition
  • Stride rate
  • Walk-run transition

Cite this

Voigt, M ; Hyttel, M K ; Jakobsen, L S ; Jensen, M K ; Balle, H ; Hansen, E A. / Human walk-to-run transition in the context of the behaviour of complex systems. In: Human Movement Science. 2019 ; Vol. 67.
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abstract = "This study had two main aims: 1) to investigate if the walk-to-run (WR-) transition occurs when the speed of locomotion is kept constant below the WR-transition speed (speed clamp) and the stride rate is increased monotonously using a metronome and 2) to investigate if diversion of attention and awareness from the locomotion process influences the position of the WR-transition in stride rate, stride length, and locomotion speed (SrSlLs) space. Eighteen healthy individuals (13 men and 5 women) were recruited (age: 23.9 ± 1.5 years, height: 1.77 ± 0.10 m and body mass: 77.3 ± 12.8 kg). Stride-by-stride stride rates, stride lengths, locomotion speeds, and duty factors were determined on a treadmill in 4 different tests: 1) reference WR-transition, 2) preferred walking speed, 3) dual-task test including arithmetic calculations and 4) four speed clamp bouts with different initial velocities. Walk-to-run transitions were elicited in all participants in the speed clamp bouts. When the stride rate ramp was clamped at preferred walking speed the WR-transition stride rate was not significantly different from the WR-transition stride rate during the reference test (t = 2.2, p = 0.312). However, in the SrSlLs space the speed clamp WR-transitions all deviated from the position of the reference WR-transition. Additionally, it was demonstrated that intensive attentional diversion using a dual-task paradigm had very little influence on the position of the WR-transition in the SrSlLs space. It is argued that these observations can be explained in the context of the behavior of complex systems.",
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Human walk-to-run transition in the context of the behaviour of complex systems. / Voigt, M; Hyttel, M K; Jakobsen, L S; Jensen, M K; Balle, H; Hansen, E A.

In: Human Movement Science, Vol. 67, 102509, 01.10.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

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T1 - Human walk-to-run transition in the context of the behaviour of complex systems

AU - Voigt, M

AU - Hyttel, M K

AU - Jakobsen, L S

AU - Jensen, M K

AU - Balle, H

AU - Hansen, E A

N1 - Copyright © 2019 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

PY - 2019/10/1

Y1 - 2019/10/1

N2 - This study had two main aims: 1) to investigate if the walk-to-run (WR-) transition occurs when the speed of locomotion is kept constant below the WR-transition speed (speed clamp) and the stride rate is increased monotonously using a metronome and 2) to investigate if diversion of attention and awareness from the locomotion process influences the position of the WR-transition in stride rate, stride length, and locomotion speed (SrSlLs) space. Eighteen healthy individuals (13 men and 5 women) were recruited (age: 23.9 ± 1.5 years, height: 1.77 ± 0.10 m and body mass: 77.3 ± 12.8 kg). Stride-by-stride stride rates, stride lengths, locomotion speeds, and duty factors were determined on a treadmill in 4 different tests: 1) reference WR-transition, 2) preferred walking speed, 3) dual-task test including arithmetic calculations and 4) four speed clamp bouts with different initial velocities. Walk-to-run transitions were elicited in all participants in the speed clamp bouts. When the stride rate ramp was clamped at preferred walking speed the WR-transition stride rate was not significantly different from the WR-transition stride rate during the reference test (t = 2.2, p = 0.312). However, in the SrSlLs space the speed clamp WR-transitions all deviated from the position of the reference WR-transition. Additionally, it was demonstrated that intensive attentional diversion using a dual-task paradigm had very little influence on the position of the WR-transition in the SrSlLs space. It is argued that these observations can be explained in the context of the behavior of complex systems.

AB - This study had two main aims: 1) to investigate if the walk-to-run (WR-) transition occurs when the speed of locomotion is kept constant below the WR-transition speed (speed clamp) and the stride rate is increased monotonously using a metronome and 2) to investigate if diversion of attention and awareness from the locomotion process influences the position of the WR-transition in stride rate, stride length, and locomotion speed (SrSlLs) space. Eighteen healthy individuals (13 men and 5 women) were recruited (age: 23.9 ± 1.5 years, height: 1.77 ± 0.10 m and body mass: 77.3 ± 12.8 kg). Stride-by-stride stride rates, stride lengths, locomotion speeds, and duty factors were determined on a treadmill in 4 different tests: 1) reference WR-transition, 2) preferred walking speed, 3) dual-task test including arithmetic calculations and 4) four speed clamp bouts with different initial velocities. Walk-to-run transitions were elicited in all participants in the speed clamp bouts. When the stride rate ramp was clamped at preferred walking speed the WR-transition stride rate was not significantly different from the WR-transition stride rate during the reference test (t = 2.2, p = 0.312). However, in the SrSlLs space the speed clamp WR-transitions all deviated from the position of the reference WR-transition. Additionally, it was demonstrated that intensive attentional diversion using a dual-task paradigm had very little influence on the position of the WR-transition in the SrSlLs space. It is argued that these observations can be explained in the context of the behavior of complex systems.

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KW - Bi-pedal gait

KW - Gait transition

KW - Stride rate

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DO - 10.1016/j.humov.2019.102509

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JO - Human Movement Science

JF - Human Movement Science

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