Identifying coastal towns and small cities in Denmark using global population data to support climate change adaptation

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Abstract

Coastal settlements face many hazards from climate change. Consequently, there has been extensive focus on developing and implementing adaptation. However, these efforts have prodominantly centred on larger cities. Coastal towns and small cities (urban areas between 1000 and 100,000 people) have received little attention, despite experiencing a number of barriers to adaptation. The absence of information on the global scale of the adaptation challenge within coastal towns and small cities may have contributed to these settlements being overlooked. This paper develops a method that can be used to estimate the numbers, sizes, and locations of coastal towns and small cities worldwide from global population data (Global Human Settlement data). Denmark is used as a pilot for this method with settlements over 1000 people classified with relatively high accuracy. The method developed here represents a potentially fruitful approach to supporting coastal adaptation, as coastal towns and small cities are identifiable globally, they can be classified into types. This will support an assessment of their risk to coastal hazards, and could facilitate knowledge and practice sharing between similar coastal towns and small cities.
Original languageEnglish
JournalInternational Journal of Digital Earth
Number of pages15
ISSN1753-8947
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019

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Climate change
Hazards
hazard
human settlement
climate change adaptation
city
urban area
climate change
method

Keywords

  • Climate change adaptation
  • global data
  • coastal hazards
  • Denmark
  • small urban areas

Cite this

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title = "Identifying coastal towns and small cities in Denmark using global population data to support climate change adaptation",
abstract = "Coastal settlements face many hazards from climate change. Consequently, there has been extensive focus on developing and implementing adaptation. However, these efforts have prodominantly centred on larger cities. Coastal towns and small cities (urban areas between 1000 and 100,000 people) have received little attention, despite experiencing a number of barriers to adaptation. The absence of information on the global scale of the adaptation challenge within coastal towns and small cities may have contributed to these settlements being overlooked. This paper develops a method that can be used to estimate the numbers, sizes, and locations of coastal towns and small cities worldwide from global population data (Global Human Settlement data). Denmark is used as a pilot for this method with settlements over 1000 people classified with relatively high accuracy. The method developed here represents a potentially fruitful approach to supporting coastal adaptation, as coastal towns and small cities are identifiable globally, they can be classified into types. This will support an assessment of their risk to coastal hazards, and could facilitate knowledge and practice sharing between similar coastal towns and small cities.",
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AU - Fitton, James

AU - Lehmann, Martin

AU - Major, David

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N2 - Coastal settlements face many hazards from climate change. Consequently, there has been extensive focus on developing and implementing adaptation. However, these efforts have prodominantly centred on larger cities. Coastal towns and small cities (urban areas between 1000 and 100,000 people) have received little attention, despite experiencing a number of barriers to adaptation. The absence of information on the global scale of the adaptation challenge within coastal towns and small cities may have contributed to these settlements being overlooked. This paper develops a method that can be used to estimate the numbers, sizes, and locations of coastal towns and small cities worldwide from global population data (Global Human Settlement data). Denmark is used as a pilot for this method with settlements over 1000 people classified with relatively high accuracy. The method developed here represents a potentially fruitful approach to supporting coastal adaptation, as coastal towns and small cities are identifiable globally, they can be classified into types. This will support an assessment of their risk to coastal hazards, and could facilitate knowledge and practice sharing between similar coastal towns and small cities.

AB - Coastal settlements face many hazards from climate change. Consequently, there has been extensive focus on developing and implementing adaptation. However, these efforts have prodominantly centred on larger cities. Coastal towns and small cities (urban areas between 1000 and 100,000 people) have received little attention, despite experiencing a number of barriers to adaptation. The absence of information on the global scale of the adaptation challenge within coastal towns and small cities may have contributed to these settlements being overlooked. This paper develops a method that can be used to estimate the numbers, sizes, and locations of coastal towns and small cities worldwide from global population data (Global Human Settlement data). Denmark is used as a pilot for this method with settlements over 1000 people classified with relatively high accuracy. The method developed here represents a potentially fruitful approach to supporting coastal adaptation, as coastal towns and small cities are identifiable globally, they can be classified into types. This will support an assessment of their risk to coastal hazards, and could facilitate knowledge and practice sharing between similar coastal towns and small cities.

KW - Climate change adaptation

KW - global data

KW - coastal hazards

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KW - small urban areas

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