Inflammatory bowel disease at a young age – implications for achieving upper secondary education

J Rasmussen, BM Nørgård, RG Nielsen, H Bøggild, N Qvist, RBK Brund, NH Bruun, K Fonager

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Abstract

The incidence of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) among children and adolescence is increasing worldwide. Having a chronic condition at a young age may affect educational achievement and later employment and self-support. The study aims to examine the impact of being diagnosed with IBD before 18 years of age on achieving an upper secondary education before 25 years of age.Using the Danish National Patient Register (1980-2018) all patients (born 1970-1994) diagnosed with IBD at a young age (<18 years) were identified. The IBD-patients were matched on age and sex with 10 references without IBD at the index date (date of diagnosis of IBD). The outcome was achieving an upper secondary education using data from Danish Education Registers. The association between IBD diagnosis and achieving an upper secondary education was analyzed using Cox regression with robust variance estimation adjusting for parents’ highest educational level. Furthermore, stratified analyses were performed on parental socioeconomic status (education and income).We identified 3,178 patients with IBD: Crohn’s disease (CD) n = 1,344, Ulcerative colitis (UC) n = 1,834. Reference n = 28,220. The median age at diagnosis was 15.3 years (IQR: [13.0;16.9]). At the age of 25 74.0% (CI: 71.6-76.4) for CD, 75.8% (CI: 73.8-77.8) for UC, and 69.7% (CI: 69.2-70.3) for references had achieved an upper secondary education. The adjusted Hazard ratio (HR) of achieving an upper secondary education was 1.05 (CI: 1.00 -1.11) for CD and 1.09 (CI: 1.04 -1.15) for UC. When stratifying the IBD-patient with the lowest socioeconomic status performed better than their peers.Being diagnosed with IBD before 18 years of age did not reduce the chance of achieving an upper secondary education. Patients with low socioeconomic status performed better than their peers, however the study gives no explanation of this.• Children diagnosed with IBD before 18 years of age had at least the same chance of achieving an upper secondary education compared to references.• IBD patients with low social economic status performed better than their peers.
Original languageEnglish
Article numberckac131.444
JournalEuropean Journal of Public Health
Volume32
Issue numberSuppl. 3
Pages (from-to)iii590
Number of pages1
ISSN1101-1262
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2022
Event15th European Public Health Conference: Strengthening health systems: improving population health and being prepared for the unexpected - Berlin, Germany
Duration: 9 Nov 202212 Nov 2022
Conference number: 15
https://ephconference.eu/Berlin-2022-290

Conference

Conference15th European Public Health Conference
Number15
Country/TerritoryGermany
CityBerlin
Period09/11/202212/11/2022
Internet address

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