Interface Fracture in Adhesively Bonded Shell Structures

Henrik Myhre Jensen

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Two methods for the prediction of crack propagation through the interface of adhesively bonded shells are discussed. One is based on a fracture mechanics approach; the other is based on a cohesive zone approach. Attention is focussed on predicting the shape of the crack front and the critical stress required to propagate the crack under quasi-static conditions. The fracture mechanical model is theoretically sound and it is accurate and numerically stable. The cohesive zone model has some advantages over the fracture mechanics based model. It is easier to generalise the cohesive zone model to take into account effects such as plastic deformation in the adhering shells, and to take into account effects of large local curvatures of the interface crack front. The comparison shows a convergence of the results based on the cohesive zone model towards the results based on a fracture mechanics approach in the limit where the size of the cohesive zone becomes smaller than other relevant geometrical lengths for the problem. However, convergence issues and numerical stability must be addressed.
Original languageEnglish
JournalEngineering Fracture Mechanics
Volume75
Issue number3-4
Pages (from-to)571-578
ISSN0013-7944
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2 Feb 2007

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Fracture mechanics
Cracks
Convergence of numerical methods
Crack propagation
Plastic deformation
Acoustic waves

Keywords

  • Shell theory
  • Interface fracture
  • Cohesive zone modelling
  • Crack shape

Cite this

Jensen, Henrik Myhre. / Interface Fracture in Adhesively Bonded Shell Structures. In: Engineering Fracture Mechanics. 2007 ; Vol. 75, No. 3-4. pp. 571-578.
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Interface Fracture in Adhesively Bonded Shell Structures. / Jensen, Henrik Myhre.

In: Engineering Fracture Mechanics, Vol. 75, No. 3-4, 02.02.2007, p. 571-578.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

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