Joint associations of obsity and other cardiovascular risk factors in relation to risk of acute coronary syndrome

Majken K. Jensen, Stephanie Chiuve, Eric B. Rimm, Claus Dethlefsen, Kim Overvad

Research output: Contribution to conference without publisher/journalPosterResearch

Abstract

Background: Obesity is a well-established risk factor for coronary heart disease (CHD). However, the influence of other lifestyle and clinical risk factors on the association between body-mass index (BMI: weight in kg/height in m2) and CHD remains uncertain. Methods and Results: In the Danish Diet, Cancer and Health study, we followed 29,262 women and 26,088 men, 50 to 64 years of age, who were free of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and cancer at baseline in 1993-1997. During a mean follow-up of 8 years, we documented 262 female and 845 male cases of ACS. Lifestyle risk factors were categorized as current smoking, <30 min/week of sports activity, below the median for the Mediterranean diet score, and <8 years of education. Clinical risk factors included self-reported hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, and diabetes. Overweight (BMI>25 kg/m2) and obesity (BMI>30 kg/m2) were significantly associated with a higher risk of ACS, as were each of the individual lifestyle and clinical risk factors. Joint effects of obesity and each risk factor were close to additive. When all lifestyle factors were summed, obese individuals with the greatest number of lifestyle factors had the highest risk, but no synergism was observed. Similar results were seen for clinical risk factors. Of importance, a strong direct association between BMI and ACS was observed even among participants with the lowest number of other risk factors present. Conclusions: Our results illustrate that BMI is an important, independent predictor of ACS risk, even among individuals who have few CHD risk factors. BMI and other CHD risk factors appear to work in an additive fashion on risk of ACS.
Original languageEnglish
Publication date2007
Number of pages1
Publication statusPublished - 2007
EventAnnual Conference on Cardiovascular Disease Epidemiology and Prevention - Orlando, FL, United States
Duration: 28 Feb 20073 Mar 2007
Conference number: 47

Conference

ConferenceAnnual Conference on Cardiovascular Disease Epidemiology and Prevention
Number47
CountryUnited States
CityOrlando, FL
Period28/02/200703/03/2007

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Acute Coronary Syndrome
Life Style
Coronary Disease
Obesity
Neoplasms
Body Mass Index
Smoking
Diet
Weights and Measures
Health

Cite this

Jensen, M. K., Chiuve, S., Rimm, E. B., Dethlefsen, C., & Overvad, K. (2007). Joint associations of obsity and other cardiovascular risk factors in relation to risk of acute coronary syndrome. Poster session presented at Annual Conference on Cardiovascular Disease Epidemiology and Prevention, Orlando, FL, United States.
Jensen, Majken K. ; Chiuve, Stephanie ; Rimm, Eric B. ; Dethlefsen, Claus ; Overvad, Kim. / Joint associations of obsity and other cardiovascular risk factors in relation to risk of acute coronary syndrome. Poster session presented at Annual Conference on Cardiovascular Disease Epidemiology and Prevention, Orlando, FL, United States.1 p.
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abstract = "Background: Obesity is a well-established risk factor for coronary heart disease (CHD). However, the influence of other lifestyle and clinical risk factors on the association between body-mass index (BMI: weight in kg/height in m2) and CHD remains uncertain. Methods and Results: In the Danish Diet, Cancer and Health study, we followed 29,262 women and 26,088 men, 50 to 64 years of age, who were free of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and cancer at baseline in 1993-1997. During a mean follow-up of 8 years, we documented 262 female and 845 male cases of ACS. Lifestyle risk factors were categorized as current smoking, <30 min/week of sports activity, below the median for the Mediterranean diet score, and <8 years of education. Clinical risk factors included self-reported hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, and diabetes. Overweight (BMI>25 kg/m2) and obesity (BMI>30 kg/m2) were significantly associated with a higher risk of ACS, as were each of the individual lifestyle and clinical risk factors. Joint effects of obesity and each risk factor were close to additive. When all lifestyle factors were summed, obese individuals with the greatest number of lifestyle factors had the highest risk, but no synergism was observed. Similar results were seen for clinical risk factors. Of importance, a strong direct association between BMI and ACS was observed even among participants with the lowest number of other risk factors present. Conclusions: Our results illustrate that BMI is an important, independent predictor of ACS risk, even among individuals who have few CHD risk factors. BMI and other CHD risk factors appear to work in an additive fashion on risk of ACS.",
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Jensen, MK, Chiuve, S, Rimm, EB, Dethlefsen, C & Overvad, K 2007, 'Joint associations of obsity and other cardiovascular risk factors in relation to risk of acute coronary syndrome', Orlando, FL, United States, 28/02/2007 - 03/03/2007, .

Joint associations of obsity and other cardiovascular risk factors in relation to risk of acute coronary syndrome. / Jensen, Majken K.; Chiuve, Stephanie; Rimm, Eric B.; Dethlefsen, Claus; Overvad, Kim.

2007. Poster session presented at Annual Conference on Cardiovascular Disease Epidemiology and Prevention, Orlando, FL, United States.

Research output: Contribution to conference without publisher/journalPosterResearch

TY - CONF

T1 - Joint associations of obsity and other cardiovascular risk factors in relation to risk of acute coronary syndrome

AU - Jensen, Majken K.

AU - Chiuve, Stephanie

AU - Rimm, Eric B.

AU - Dethlefsen, Claus

AU - Overvad, Kim

N1 - Titel på proceedings: Circulation, Vol. 115, Nr. 8 Oversat titel på proceedings: Circulation

PY - 2007

Y1 - 2007

N2 - Background: Obesity is a well-established risk factor for coronary heart disease (CHD). However, the influence of other lifestyle and clinical risk factors on the association between body-mass index (BMI: weight in kg/height in m2) and CHD remains uncertain. Methods and Results: In the Danish Diet, Cancer and Health study, we followed 29,262 women and 26,088 men, 50 to 64 years of age, who were free of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and cancer at baseline in 1993-1997. During a mean follow-up of 8 years, we documented 262 female and 845 male cases of ACS. Lifestyle risk factors were categorized as current smoking, <30 min/week of sports activity, below the median for the Mediterranean diet score, and <8 years of education. Clinical risk factors included self-reported hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, and diabetes. Overweight (BMI>25 kg/m2) and obesity (BMI>30 kg/m2) were significantly associated with a higher risk of ACS, as were each of the individual lifestyle and clinical risk factors. Joint effects of obesity and each risk factor were close to additive. When all lifestyle factors were summed, obese individuals with the greatest number of lifestyle factors had the highest risk, but no synergism was observed. Similar results were seen for clinical risk factors. Of importance, a strong direct association between BMI and ACS was observed even among participants with the lowest number of other risk factors present. Conclusions: Our results illustrate that BMI is an important, independent predictor of ACS risk, even among individuals who have few CHD risk factors. BMI and other CHD risk factors appear to work in an additive fashion on risk of ACS.

AB - Background: Obesity is a well-established risk factor for coronary heart disease (CHD). However, the influence of other lifestyle and clinical risk factors on the association between body-mass index (BMI: weight in kg/height in m2) and CHD remains uncertain. Methods and Results: In the Danish Diet, Cancer and Health study, we followed 29,262 women and 26,088 men, 50 to 64 years of age, who were free of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and cancer at baseline in 1993-1997. During a mean follow-up of 8 years, we documented 262 female and 845 male cases of ACS. Lifestyle risk factors were categorized as current smoking, <30 min/week of sports activity, below the median for the Mediterranean diet score, and <8 years of education. Clinical risk factors included self-reported hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, and diabetes. Overweight (BMI>25 kg/m2) and obesity (BMI>30 kg/m2) were significantly associated with a higher risk of ACS, as were each of the individual lifestyle and clinical risk factors. Joint effects of obesity and each risk factor were close to additive. When all lifestyle factors were summed, obese individuals with the greatest number of lifestyle factors had the highest risk, but no synergism was observed. Similar results were seen for clinical risk factors. Of importance, a strong direct association between BMI and ACS was observed even among participants with the lowest number of other risk factors present. Conclusions: Our results illustrate that BMI is an important, independent predictor of ACS risk, even among individuals who have few CHD risk factors. BMI and other CHD risk factors appear to work in an additive fashion on risk of ACS.

M3 - Poster

ER -

Jensen MK, Chiuve S, Rimm EB, Dethlefsen C, Overvad K. Joint associations of obsity and other cardiovascular risk factors in relation to risk of acute coronary syndrome. 2007. Poster session presented at Annual Conference on Cardiovascular Disease Epidemiology and Prevention, Orlando, FL, United States.