Learning to Be Mobile: Children in/on Bikes in a Pro-Biking Environment

Research output: Contribution to conference without publisher/journalConference abstract for conferenceResearchpeer-review

Abstract

As an antidote to the fixation with automobility, cycling and other such highly mobile ‘carbon neutral’ leisure activities are the focus of recent studies that use mobile ‘travelling with’ methods such as the ‘ride along’ or headcam POV video technology with post-ride debriefing. Much of this creative cyclomobility research focuses on adult cycling or more extreme sports, such as BMX trials or mountain biking. There is, however, little qualitative research to date on family bike rides, eg. how children learn to sit in or ride a bike and how parents or caregivers talk and interact with children to instruct them in how to ride safely and to construct the moral order of the road in situ. Moreover, much research conducted in the US/UK depicts a hostile urban environment for bikes, in which bikers must navigate a dangerous, car-centred roadscape.
This paper reports on a preliminary investigation of two types of bike-rider-passenger ‘mobile with’ configurations typical in urban settings of bike-friendly Denmark. First, the rider who rides with a child in their front loaded transport/carrier tricycle. Second, the rider who rides with a child while they ride their own bike. Both take place in urban areas predominantly on separate bike lanes, with bike-only traffic lights at intersections for example. The analysis will be illustrated with clips comprising multi-angle video recordings of the two types of bike rides. After several experiments, more than one video camera was necessary to capture audio and visual features of the local organisation of the ride from the participants’ perspective(s). In addition, new ways to represent (in transcript form) specific features of the sensefulness of riding together were developed, eg. the relative mobility of different actors while doing ‘being mobile’. Several phenomena are presented and discussed: 1) riding/talk formations; 2) stretchy participation frameworks; 3) navigating static and moving obstacles; 4) situated noticings: 5) learning safe riding; and 6) negotiating the appropriate road conduct of other road users.
Original languageEnglish
Publication date28 Oct 2010
Number of pages1
Publication statusPublished - 28 Oct 2010
EventCultures of Mobilities: Everyday life, Communication, and Politics - Aalborg, Denmark
Duration: 27 Oct 201029 Oct 2010

Conference

ConferenceCultures of Mobilities: Everyday life, Communication, and Politics
CountryDenmark
CityAalborg
Period27/10/201029/10/2010
Otherhttp://www.ocs.hum.aau.dk/ocs/index.php/cmus/cosmob2010

Fingerprint

learning
extreme sports
video
road
video recording
road user
research focus
Denmark
caregiver
qualitative research
urban area
parents
traffic
participation
experiment

Keywords

  • mobility

Cite this

McIlvenny, P. (2010). Learning to Be Mobile: Children in/on Bikes in a Pro-Biking Environment. Abstract from Cultures of Mobilities: Everyday life, Communication, and Politics, Aalborg, Denmark.
McIlvenny, Paul. / Learning to Be Mobile : Children in/on Bikes in a Pro-Biking Environment. Abstract from Cultures of Mobilities: Everyday life, Communication, and Politics, Aalborg, Denmark.1 p.
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Learning to Be Mobile : Children in/on Bikes in a Pro-Biking Environment. / McIlvenny, Paul.

2010. Abstract from Cultures of Mobilities: Everyday life, Communication, and Politics, Aalborg, Denmark.

Research output: Contribution to conference without publisher/journalConference abstract for conferenceResearchpeer-review

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McIlvenny P. Learning to Be Mobile: Children in/on Bikes in a Pro-Biking Environment. 2010. Abstract from Cultures of Mobilities: Everyday life, Communication, and Politics, Aalborg, Denmark.