Longevity and admission to nursing home according to age after isolated coronary artery bypass surgery: A nationwide cohort study

Research output: Contribution to book/anthology/report/conference proceedingConference abstract in proceedingResearchpeer-review

Abstract

O5 Longevity and admission to nursing home according to age after isolated coronary artery bypass surgery: A nationwide cohort study Kristinn Thorsteinsson, Jan Jesper Andreasen, Christian Torp Pedersen, Kirsten Fonager, Rikke Nørmark Mortensen, Kristian Kragholm, Gunnar Gislason, Lars Køber. Aalborg, Denmark Background: Data on nursing home admission in patients >80 years of age after isolated coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) are scarce. Aim: The purpose of this study was to evaluate longevity and subsequent admission to nursing home stratified by age in a nationwide CABG cohort. Methods: All patients who underwent isolated CABG in 1996-2012 in Denmark were identified through nationwide administrative registers and included. The cumulative incidence of admission to a nursing home after CABG was estimated. A cause specific Cox-regression model was constructed to identify predictors for living in a nursing home one year after CABG. Kaplan-Meier estimates were used for survival analysis. Results: A total of 38,487 patients were included. Median age was 65.4 ± 9.5 years (1,455 >80 years) and 80% were males. The 30-day mortality was 2.8%, increasing with age (1.2% in patients <60 years and 7.6% in patients >80 years). Mortality at 1 year was 2.2% and 13.9% among patients aged <60 and >80 years, respectively. Proportion of patients admitted to a nursing home at 1,5 and 10 years after CABG was 0.1%, 0.2% and 0.9% (<60 years), 1.5%, 7.7% and 17% (>80 years), respectively. Main predictors for living in a nursing home one year after surgery were: age >80 years (HR 16.70, 95% CI 6.94-40.20), female sex (HR 1.66, 95% CI 1.11- 2.50), heart failure (HR 1.59, 95% CI 1.03-2.40), previous myocardial infarction (HR 2.07, 95% CI 1.33-3.20), previous stroke (HR 2.21, 95% CI 1.42-3.40), stroke < 30 days after surgery ( HR 11.00, 95% CI 6.81-17.80). Neither urgent nor emergent surgeries were significant predictors for living in a nursery home 1 year after surgery. Conclusion: Elderly patients undergoing CABG stay in their homes for many years after surgery. The risk of nursing home admission is small and is dependent on the patient’s preoperative co-morbidities.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProgram and abstract book : 7th Joint Scandinavian Conference in Cardiothoracic Surgery 2015
Number of pages1
Publication date3 Sep 2015
Pages39
Publication statusPublished - 3 Sep 2015
Event7 th Joint Scandinavian Conference in Cardiothoracic surgery - Radisson Blu Royal Hotel Bergen Bryggen 5 5003 Bergen, Bergen, Norway
Duration: 3 Sep 20155 Sep 2015
http://www.sats2015.com/

Conference

Conference7 th Joint Scandinavian Conference in Cardiothoracic surgery
LocationRadisson Blu Royal Hotel Bergen Bryggen 5 5003 Bergen
CountryNorway
CityBergen
Period03/09/201505/09/2015
Internet address

Cite this

@inbook{d6f060ba7a594d0496091ee1f186f222,
title = "Longevity and admission to nursing home according to age after isolated coronary artery bypass surgery: A nationwide cohort study",
abstract = "O5 Longevity and admission to nursing home according to age after isolated coronary artery bypass surgery: A nationwide cohort study Kristinn Thorsteinsson, Jan Jesper Andreasen, Christian Torp Pedersen, Kirsten Fonager, Rikke N{\o}rmark Mortensen, Kristian Kragholm, Gunnar Gislason, Lars K{\o}ber. Aalborg, Denmark Background: Data on nursing home admission in patients >80 years of age after isolated coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) are scarce. Aim: The purpose of this study was to evaluate longevity and subsequent admission to nursing home stratified by age in a nationwide CABG cohort. Methods: All patients who underwent isolated CABG in 1996-2012 in Denmark were identified through nationwide administrative registers and included. The cumulative incidence of admission to a nursing home after CABG was estimated. A cause specific Cox-regression model was constructed to identify predictors for living in a nursing home one year after CABG. Kaplan-Meier estimates were used for survival analysis. Results: A total of 38,487 patients were included. Median age was 65.4 ± 9.5 years (1,455 >80 years) and 80{\%} were males. The 30-day mortality was 2.8{\%}, increasing with age (1.2{\%} in patients <60 years and 7.6{\%} in patients >80 years). Mortality at 1 year was 2.2{\%} and 13.9{\%} among patients aged <60 and >80 years, respectively. Proportion of patients admitted to a nursing home at 1,5 and 10 years after CABG was 0.1{\%}, 0.2{\%} and 0.9{\%} (<60 years), 1.5{\%}, 7.7{\%} and 17{\%} (>80 years), respectively. Main predictors for living in a nursing home one year after surgery were: age >80 years (HR 16.70, 95{\%} CI 6.94-40.20), female sex (HR 1.66, 95{\%} CI 1.11- 2.50), heart failure (HR 1.59, 95{\%} CI 1.03-2.40), previous myocardial infarction (HR 2.07, 95{\%} CI 1.33-3.20), previous stroke (HR 2.21, 95{\%} CI 1.42-3.40), stroke < 30 days after surgery ( HR 11.00, 95{\%} CI 6.81-17.80). Neither urgent nor emergent surgeries were significant predictors for living in a nursery home 1 year after surgery. Conclusion: Elderly patients undergoing CABG stay in their homes for many years after surgery. The risk of nursing home admission is small and is dependent on the patient’s preoperative co-morbidities.",
author = "Kristinn Thorsteinsson and Andreasen, {Jan Jesper} and Christian Torp-Pedersen and Kirsten Fonager and Mortensen, {Rikke N{\o}rmark} and S{\o}rensen, {Kristian Dahl Kragholm} and Gunnar Gislason and Lars K{\o}ber",
year = "2015",
month = "9",
day = "3",
language = "English",
pages = "39",
booktitle = "Program and abstract book",

}

Thorsteinsson, K, Andreasen, JJ, Torp-Pedersen, C, Fonager, K, Mortensen, RN, Sørensen, KDK, Gislason, G & Køber, L 2015, Longevity and admission to nursing home according to age after isolated coronary artery bypass surgery: A nationwide cohort study. in Program and abstract book: 7th Joint Scandinavian Conference in Cardiothoracic Surgery 2015. pp. 39, 7 th Joint Scandinavian Conference in Cardiothoracic surgery, Bergen, Norway, 03/09/2015.

Longevity and admission to nursing home according to age after isolated coronary artery bypass surgery : A nationwide cohort study. / Thorsteinsson, Kristinn; Andreasen, Jan Jesper; Torp-Pedersen, Christian; Fonager, Kirsten; Mortensen, Rikke Nørmark; Sørensen, Kristian Dahl Kragholm ; Gislason, Gunnar; Køber, Lars.

Program and abstract book: 7th Joint Scandinavian Conference in Cardiothoracic Surgery 2015. 2015. p. 39.

Research output: Contribution to book/anthology/report/conference proceedingConference abstract in proceedingResearchpeer-review

TY - ABST

T1 - Longevity and admission to nursing home according to age after isolated coronary artery bypass surgery

T2 - A nationwide cohort study

AU - Thorsteinsson, Kristinn

AU - Andreasen, Jan Jesper

AU - Torp-Pedersen, Christian

AU - Fonager, Kirsten

AU - Mortensen, Rikke Nørmark

AU - Sørensen, Kristian Dahl Kragholm

AU - Gislason, Gunnar

AU - Køber, Lars

PY - 2015/9/3

Y1 - 2015/9/3

N2 - O5 Longevity and admission to nursing home according to age after isolated coronary artery bypass surgery: A nationwide cohort study Kristinn Thorsteinsson, Jan Jesper Andreasen, Christian Torp Pedersen, Kirsten Fonager, Rikke Nørmark Mortensen, Kristian Kragholm, Gunnar Gislason, Lars Køber. Aalborg, Denmark Background: Data on nursing home admission in patients >80 years of age after isolated coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) are scarce. Aim: The purpose of this study was to evaluate longevity and subsequent admission to nursing home stratified by age in a nationwide CABG cohort. Methods: All patients who underwent isolated CABG in 1996-2012 in Denmark were identified through nationwide administrative registers and included. The cumulative incidence of admission to a nursing home after CABG was estimated. A cause specific Cox-regression model was constructed to identify predictors for living in a nursing home one year after CABG. Kaplan-Meier estimates were used for survival analysis. Results: A total of 38,487 patients were included. Median age was 65.4 ± 9.5 years (1,455 >80 years) and 80% were males. The 30-day mortality was 2.8%, increasing with age (1.2% in patients <60 years and 7.6% in patients >80 years). Mortality at 1 year was 2.2% and 13.9% among patients aged <60 and >80 years, respectively. Proportion of patients admitted to a nursing home at 1,5 and 10 years after CABG was 0.1%, 0.2% and 0.9% (<60 years), 1.5%, 7.7% and 17% (>80 years), respectively. Main predictors for living in a nursing home one year after surgery were: age >80 years (HR 16.70, 95% CI 6.94-40.20), female sex (HR 1.66, 95% CI 1.11- 2.50), heart failure (HR 1.59, 95% CI 1.03-2.40), previous myocardial infarction (HR 2.07, 95% CI 1.33-3.20), previous stroke (HR 2.21, 95% CI 1.42-3.40), stroke < 30 days after surgery ( HR 11.00, 95% CI 6.81-17.80). Neither urgent nor emergent surgeries were significant predictors for living in a nursery home 1 year after surgery. Conclusion: Elderly patients undergoing CABG stay in their homes for many years after surgery. The risk of nursing home admission is small and is dependent on the patient’s preoperative co-morbidities.

AB - O5 Longevity and admission to nursing home according to age after isolated coronary artery bypass surgery: A nationwide cohort study Kristinn Thorsteinsson, Jan Jesper Andreasen, Christian Torp Pedersen, Kirsten Fonager, Rikke Nørmark Mortensen, Kristian Kragholm, Gunnar Gislason, Lars Køber. Aalborg, Denmark Background: Data on nursing home admission in patients >80 years of age after isolated coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) are scarce. Aim: The purpose of this study was to evaluate longevity and subsequent admission to nursing home stratified by age in a nationwide CABG cohort. Methods: All patients who underwent isolated CABG in 1996-2012 in Denmark were identified through nationwide administrative registers and included. The cumulative incidence of admission to a nursing home after CABG was estimated. A cause specific Cox-regression model was constructed to identify predictors for living in a nursing home one year after CABG. Kaplan-Meier estimates were used for survival analysis. Results: A total of 38,487 patients were included. Median age was 65.4 ± 9.5 years (1,455 >80 years) and 80% were males. The 30-day mortality was 2.8%, increasing with age (1.2% in patients <60 years and 7.6% in patients >80 years). Mortality at 1 year was 2.2% and 13.9% among patients aged <60 and >80 years, respectively. Proportion of patients admitted to a nursing home at 1,5 and 10 years after CABG was 0.1%, 0.2% and 0.9% (<60 years), 1.5%, 7.7% and 17% (>80 years), respectively. Main predictors for living in a nursing home one year after surgery were: age >80 years (HR 16.70, 95% CI 6.94-40.20), female sex (HR 1.66, 95% CI 1.11- 2.50), heart failure (HR 1.59, 95% CI 1.03-2.40), previous myocardial infarction (HR 2.07, 95% CI 1.33-3.20), previous stroke (HR 2.21, 95% CI 1.42-3.40), stroke < 30 days after surgery ( HR 11.00, 95% CI 6.81-17.80). Neither urgent nor emergent surgeries were significant predictors for living in a nursery home 1 year after surgery. Conclusion: Elderly patients undergoing CABG stay in their homes for many years after surgery. The risk of nursing home admission is small and is dependent on the patient’s preoperative co-morbidities.

UR - http://www.sats2015.com/images/SATS2015-program.pdf

M3 - Conference abstract in proceeding

SP - 39

BT - Program and abstract book

ER -