Between a Rock and a Hard Place: Navigating within structural discrimination

Mira Skadegård Thorsen, Christian Horst

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

This article explores how individuals navigate in seemingly neutral contexts where discrimination occurs while it is simultaneously denied. We argue that structural discrimination (implicit and underlying forms of discrimination) is so deeply imbricated within day-to-day forms of communication, interaction, and within language, that it has become part of Danish social normality and thus also partly invisible. Further, we argue that structural discrimination is part of a shared knowledge that must be negotiated and navigated within but which changes with place and context.
In the article, we discuss the following: 1) Complex, shared underlying knowledge of discrimination which encompasses systematized stratifications of difference. 2) “A knowing the inside/being the outside position” which, for some individuals, may contribute to challenges in regard to navigations within discriminatory contexts.
Translated title of the contributionMellem to stole: Navigering i forhold til strukturel diskrimination
Original languageEnglish
JournalPatterns of Predudice
ISSN0031-322X
Publication statusSubmitted - 2017

Keywords

    Cite this

    Thorsen, M. S., & Horst, C. (2017). Between a Rock and a Hard Place: Navigating within structural discrimination. Manuscript submitted for publication.
    @article{caef80a11c9d47758092f64ee16e1525,
    title = "Between a Rock and a Hard Place: Navigating within structural discrimination",
    abstract = "This article explores how individuals navigate in seemingly neutral contexts where discrimination occurs while it is simultaneously denied. We argue that structural discrimination (implicit and underlying forms of discrimination) is so deeply imbricated within day-to-day forms of communication, interaction, and within language, that it has become part of Danish social normality and thus also partly invisible. Further, we argue that structural discrimination is part of a shared knowledge that must be negotiated and navigated within but which changes with place and context.In the article, we discuss the following: 1) Complex, shared underlying knowledge of discrimination which encompasses systematized stratifications of difference. 2) “A knowing the inside/being the outside position” which, for some individuals, may contribute to challenges in regard to navigations within discriminatory contexts.",
    keywords = "structural discrimination, racialization, racial stratification, color scale, double marginalization, double bind, knowing the inside/being the outside",
    author = "Thorsen, {Mira Skadeg{\aa}rd} and Christian Horst",
    year = "2017",
    language = "English",
    journal = "Patterns of Prejudice",
    issn = "0031-322X",
    publisher = "Routledge",

    }

    Between a Rock and a Hard Place : Navigating within structural discrimination. / Thorsen, Mira Skadegård; Horst, Christian .

    In: Patterns of Predudice, 2017.

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Between a Rock and a Hard Place

    T2 - Navigating within structural discrimination

    AU - Thorsen, Mira Skadegård

    AU - Horst, Christian

    PY - 2017

    Y1 - 2017

    N2 - This article explores how individuals navigate in seemingly neutral contexts where discrimination occurs while it is simultaneously denied. We argue that structural discrimination (implicit and underlying forms of discrimination) is so deeply imbricated within day-to-day forms of communication, interaction, and within language, that it has become part of Danish social normality and thus also partly invisible. Further, we argue that structural discrimination is part of a shared knowledge that must be negotiated and navigated within but which changes with place and context.In the article, we discuss the following: 1) Complex, shared underlying knowledge of discrimination which encompasses systematized stratifications of difference. 2) “A knowing the inside/being the outside position” which, for some individuals, may contribute to challenges in regard to navigations within discriminatory contexts.

    AB - This article explores how individuals navigate in seemingly neutral contexts where discrimination occurs while it is simultaneously denied. We argue that structural discrimination (implicit and underlying forms of discrimination) is so deeply imbricated within day-to-day forms of communication, interaction, and within language, that it has become part of Danish social normality and thus also partly invisible. Further, we argue that structural discrimination is part of a shared knowledge that must be negotiated and navigated within but which changes with place and context.In the article, we discuss the following: 1) Complex, shared underlying knowledge of discrimination which encompasses systematized stratifications of difference. 2) “A knowing the inside/being the outside position” which, for some individuals, may contribute to challenges in regard to navigations within discriminatory contexts.

    KW - structural discrimination, racialization, racial stratification, color scale, double marginalization, double bind, knowing the inside/being the outside

    M3 - Journal article

    JO - Patterns of Prejudice

    JF - Patterns of Prejudice

    SN - 0031-322X

    ER -