Migration and work-life balance in the periphery

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Abstract

This paper will address the potential of teleworking in relation to migration decisions to leave or stay in rural, peripheral locations. Various studies document long term patterns of migration from rural to urban areas but also urban-rural migration as well as significant differences between rural localities in regard to population growth or decline.
Mobility is generally low in Denmark, decreases with age and is very low from age 50 whereas mobility is high when establishing family. Thus, migration takes place in relation to life phases where young people seeking education move to cities where universities are located. Some – but few - return to the area where they grew up e.g. due to lack of jobs and career possibilities especially for those with a higher education. However, transformation of work culture driven by information and computing technology (ICT) enables working independently of time and place which leave potential for rural, peripheral locations for retaining as well as attracting qualified labor.
In the paper the relations between balanced work/family life and modern work culture is explored on the basis of research on migration between urban and rural places. Lack of development potential for rural peripheral areas is generally explained by poor proximity and connectedness to urban areas however some rural, peripheral locations succeed in retaining and attracting population which points to different qualities of specific places, individual perceptions and meaning of place. The paper also explores meaning of place and place identity as perceived at individual level.
The paper draws on theory on migration, belonging and settlement in a biographical perspective in which moving decisions are seen as the result of a complex process rather than caused by single event or explanation and where place and meaning of place is crucial to decisions to leave or stay in peripheral locations. The paper will also draws on recent studies on migration from rural to urban areas and vice versa.
The contribution of the paper is to develop a framework for further research into potential for local and regional development in perspective of telework centers and related to work/family balance.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationThe “new peripherality”: scaled, contested and relational : Book of abstracts
Number of pages1
PublisherPapers in Local and Regional Development
Publication date2013
Pages24-24
Publication statusPublished - 2013
EventThe 'new peripherality': scaled, contested and relational - Aalborg Universitet, Skibbrogade 5, Aalborg, Denmark
Duration: 28 Oct 201330 Oct 2013

Conference

ConferenceThe 'new peripherality': scaled, contested and relational
LocationAalborg Universitet, Skibbrogade 5
CountryDenmark
CityAalborg
Period28/10/201330/10/2013

Cite this

Nørgaard, H. (2013). Migration and work-life balance in the periphery. In The “new peripherality”: scaled, contested and relational: Book of abstracts (pp. 24-24). Papers in Local and Regional Development.
Nørgaard, Helle. / Migration and work-life balance in the periphery. The “new peripherality”: scaled, contested and relational: Book of abstracts. Papers in Local and Regional Development, 2013. pp. 24-24
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Nørgaard, H 2013, Migration and work-life balance in the periphery. in The “new peripherality”: scaled, contested and relational: Book of abstracts. Papers in Local and Regional Development, pp. 24-24, Aalborg, Denmark, 28/10/2013.

Migration and work-life balance in the periphery. / Nørgaard, Helle.

The “new peripherality”: scaled, contested and relational: Book of abstracts. Papers in Local and Regional Development, 2013. p. 24-24.

Research output: Contribution to book/anthology/report/conference proceedingConference abstract in proceedingResearchpeer-review

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N2 - This paper will address the potential of teleworking in relation to migration decisions to leave or stay in rural, peripheral locations. Various studies document long term patterns of migration from rural to urban areas but also urban-rural migration as well as significant differences between rural localities in regard to population growth or decline.Mobility is generally low in Denmark, decreases with age and is very low from age 50 whereas mobility is high when establishing family. Thus, migration takes place in relation to life phases where young people seeking education move to cities where universities are located. Some – but few - return to the area where they grew up e.g. due to lack of jobs and career possibilities especially for those with a higher education. However, transformation of work culture driven by information and computing technology (ICT) enables working independently of time and place which leave potential for rural, peripheral locations for retaining as well as attracting qualified labor.In the paper the relations between balanced work/family life and modern work culture is explored on the basis of research on migration between urban and rural places. Lack of development potential for rural peripheral areas is generally explained by poor proximity and connectedness to urban areas however some rural, peripheral locations succeed in retaining and attracting population which points to different qualities of specific places, individual perceptions and meaning of place. The paper also explores meaning of place and place identity as perceived at individual level.The paper draws on theory on migration, belonging and settlement in a biographical perspective in which moving decisions are seen as the result of a complex process rather than caused by single event or explanation and where place and meaning of place is crucial to decisions to leave or stay in peripheral locations. The paper will also draws on recent studies on migration from rural to urban areas and vice versa.The contribution of the paper is to develop a framework for further research into potential for local and regional development in perspective of telework centers and related to work/family balance.

AB - This paper will address the potential of teleworking in relation to migration decisions to leave or stay in rural, peripheral locations. Various studies document long term patterns of migration from rural to urban areas but also urban-rural migration as well as significant differences between rural localities in regard to population growth or decline.Mobility is generally low in Denmark, decreases with age and is very low from age 50 whereas mobility is high when establishing family. Thus, migration takes place in relation to life phases where young people seeking education move to cities where universities are located. Some – but few - return to the area where they grew up e.g. due to lack of jobs and career possibilities especially for those with a higher education. However, transformation of work culture driven by information and computing technology (ICT) enables working independently of time and place which leave potential for rural, peripheral locations for retaining as well as attracting qualified labor.In the paper the relations between balanced work/family life and modern work culture is explored on the basis of research on migration between urban and rural places. Lack of development potential for rural peripheral areas is generally explained by poor proximity and connectedness to urban areas however some rural, peripheral locations succeed in retaining and attracting population which points to different qualities of specific places, individual perceptions and meaning of place. The paper also explores meaning of place and place identity as perceived at individual level.The paper draws on theory on migration, belonging and settlement in a biographical perspective in which moving decisions are seen as the result of a complex process rather than caused by single event or explanation and where place and meaning of place is crucial to decisions to leave or stay in peripheral locations. The paper will also draws on recent studies on migration from rural to urban areas and vice versa.The contribution of the paper is to develop a framework for further research into potential for local and regional development in perspective of telework centers and related to work/family balance.

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Nørgaard H. Migration and work-life balance in the periphery. In The “new peripherality”: scaled, contested and relational: Book of abstracts. Papers in Local and Regional Development. 2013. p. 24-24