Mom, Dad and research object: The ethics of conducting research based on your own children's everyday life

Research output: Contribution to conference without publisher/journalConference abstract for conferenceResearchpeer-review

Abstract

This paper discusses dilemmas of conducting research based on everyday experiences with one’s own children. As educational researchers with school-aged children, we are constantly confronted with practices and experiences, which are of academic relevance to our research. Brinkmann (2012) encourages researchers to do studies based on the researcher’s own life and experiences, establishing both a practical and an ideological reasoning: firstly, in the increasingly neo-liberal organization of university life, finding time and resources to conduct research is demanding, especially considering the challenge of work-family-life balance, and secondly, allowing oneself to pursue interests and questions that arise in everyday life ensures research that is both interesting and relevant for the researcher as well as for others. However, as educational researchers, the question of ethics becomes prevalent: to what extent is it ethically sound to merge the boundaries of home and work life? Is one’s child taken hostage in one’s professional endeavors?
Original languageEnglish
Publication date2016
Publication statusPublished - 2016
EventCongress of Qualitative Inquiry - Champaign-Urbana, United States
Duration: 18 May 201621 May 2016

Conference

ConferenceCongress of Qualitative Inquiry
CountryUnited States
CityChampaign-Urbana
Period18/05/201621/05/2016

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everyday life
moral philosophy
everyday experience
family work
experience
organization
university
resources
school

Cite this

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title = "Mom, Dad and research object: The ethics of conducting research based on your own children's everyday life",
abstract = "This paper discusses dilemmas of conducting research based on everyday experiences with one’s own children. As educational researchers with school-aged children, we are constantly confronted with practices and experiences, which are of academic relevance to our research. Brinkmann (2012) encourages researchers to do studies based on the researcher’s own life and experiences, establishing both a practical and an ideological reasoning: firstly, in the increasingly neo-liberal organization of university life, finding time and resources to conduct research is demanding, especially considering the challenge of work-family-life balance, and secondly, allowing oneself to pursue interests and questions that arise in everyday life ensures research that is both interesting and relevant for the researcher as well as for others. However, as educational researchers, the question of ethics becomes prevalent: to what extent is it ethically sound to merge the boundaries of home and work life? Is one’s child taken hostage in one’s professional endeavors?",
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Mom, Dad and research object : The ethics of conducting research based on your own children's everyday life. / Matthiesen, Noomi Christine Linde; Szulevicz, Thomas.

2016. Abstract from Congress of Qualitative Inquiry , Champaign-Urbana, United States.

Research output: Contribution to conference without publisher/journalConference abstract for conferenceResearchpeer-review

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AU - Szulevicz, Thomas

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N2 - This paper discusses dilemmas of conducting research based on everyday experiences with one’s own children. As educational researchers with school-aged children, we are constantly confronted with practices and experiences, which are of academic relevance to our research. Brinkmann (2012) encourages researchers to do studies based on the researcher’s own life and experiences, establishing both a practical and an ideological reasoning: firstly, in the increasingly neo-liberal organization of university life, finding time and resources to conduct research is demanding, especially considering the challenge of work-family-life balance, and secondly, allowing oneself to pursue interests and questions that arise in everyday life ensures research that is both interesting and relevant for the researcher as well as for others. However, as educational researchers, the question of ethics becomes prevalent: to what extent is it ethically sound to merge the boundaries of home and work life? Is one’s child taken hostage in one’s professional endeavors?

AB - This paper discusses dilemmas of conducting research based on everyday experiences with one’s own children. As educational researchers with school-aged children, we are constantly confronted with practices and experiences, which are of academic relevance to our research. Brinkmann (2012) encourages researchers to do studies based on the researcher’s own life and experiences, establishing both a practical and an ideological reasoning: firstly, in the increasingly neo-liberal organization of university life, finding time and resources to conduct research is demanding, especially considering the challenge of work-family-life balance, and secondly, allowing oneself to pursue interests and questions that arise in everyday life ensures research that is both interesting and relevant for the researcher as well as for others. However, as educational researchers, the question of ethics becomes prevalent: to what extent is it ethically sound to merge the boundaries of home and work life? Is one’s child taken hostage in one’s professional endeavors?

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M3 - Conference abstract for conference

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Matthiesen NCL, Szulevicz T. Mom, Dad and research object: The ethics of conducting research based on your own children's everyday life. 2016. Abstract from Congress of Qualitative Inquiry , Champaign-Urbana, United States.