Nonlinear Effects of Three-phase Diode Rectifier on Noise Emission in the Frequency Range of 2–9 kHz

Hansika Rathnayake, Firuz Zare, Dinesh Kumar, Amir Ganjavi, Pooya Davari

Research output: Contribution to book/anthology/report/conference proceedingArticle in proceedingResearchpeer-review

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Abstract

This paper presents a study on differential mode noise emission affected by a three-phase diode rectifier when there is an input Electromagnetic Interference (EMI) filter. The EMI filter is generally designed for noise attenuation beyond 150 kHz. Therefore, systematic analysis of its behaviour in the new frequency range of 2-9 kHz is essential to identify its unacceptable noise emissions. This is important to comply with upcoming emission standards in the frequency range of 2-9 kHz. This paper presents the impact of a three-phase diode rectifier and an EMI filter in different system damping conditions, different grid types and switching frequencies regarding the harmonic emission in the frequency range of 2-9 kHz. The accuracy of a proposed equivalent circuit model of EMI filter to predict grid current emissions is also evaluated for above system conditions, leading to recommendations to noise reduction at 2-9 kHz.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication2020 IEEE International Conference on Power Electronics, Drives, and Energy Systems (PEDES 2020)
Number of pages6
PublisherIEEE
Publication date2020
Pages1-6
ISBN (Print)978-1-7281-5673-6
ISBN (Electronic)978-1-7281-5672-9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2020
Event2020 IEEE International Conference on Power Electronics, Drives and Energy Systems (PEDES) - Jaipur, India
Duration: 16 Dec 202019 Dec 2020
http://pedes2020.com/

Conference

Conference2020 IEEE International Conference on Power Electronics, Drives and Energy Systems (PEDES)
Country/TerritoryIndia
CityJaipur
Period16/12/202019/12/2020
Internet address

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