Novel Acoustic Feedback Cancellation Approaches In Hearing Aid Applications Using Probe Noise and Probe Noise Enhancement

Meng Guo, Søren Holdt Jensen, Jesper Jensen

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

62 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract


Adaptive filters are widely used in acoustic feedback cancellation systems and have evolved to be state-of-the-art. One major challenge remaining is that the adaptive filter estimates are biased due to the nonzero correlation between the loudspeaker signals and the signals entering the audio system. In many cases, this bias problem causes the cancellation system to fail. The traditional probe noise approach, where a noise signal is added to the loudspeaker signal can, in theory, prevent the bias. However, in practice, the probe noise level must often be so high that the noise is clearly audible and annoying; this makes the traditional probe noise approach less useful in practical applications. In this work, we explain theoretically the decreased convergence rate when using low-level probe noise in the traditional approach, before we propose and study analytically two new probe noise approaches utilizing a combination of specifically designed probe noise signals and probe noise enhancement. Despite using low-level and inaudible probe noise signals, both approaches significantly improve the convergence behavior of the cancellation system compared to the traditional probe noise approach. This makes the proposed approaches much more attractive in practical applications. We demonstrate this through a simulation experiment with audio signals in a hearing aid acoustic feedback cancellation system, where the convergence rate is improved by as much as a factor of 10.
Original languageEnglish
JournalI E E E Transactions on Audio, Speech and Language Processing
Volume20
Issue number9
Pages (from-to)2549-2563
Number of pages15
ISSN1558-7916
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 26 Jun 2012

Fingerprint

Hearing aids
hearing
Acoustic noise
cancellation
Acoustics
Feedback
acoustics
augmentation
probes
Loudspeakers
Adaptive filters
adaptive filters
loudspeakers
Audio systems
audio signals

Keywords

  • Acoustic feedback cancellation
  • Adaptive filters
  • Probe noise
  • Probe noise enhancement
  • Hearing aids

Cite this

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title = "Novel Acoustic Feedback Cancellation Approaches In Hearing Aid Applications Using Probe Noise and Probe Noise Enhancement",
abstract = "Adaptive filters are widely used in acoustic feedback cancellation systems and have evolved to be state-of-the-art. One major challenge remaining is that the adaptive filter estimates are biased due to the nonzero correlation between the loudspeaker signals and the signals entering the audio system. In many cases, this bias problem causes the cancellation system to fail. The traditional probe noise approach, where a noise signal is added to the loudspeaker signal can, in theory, prevent the bias. However, in practice, the probe noise level must often be so high that the noise is clearly audible and annoying; this makes the traditional probe noise approach less useful in practical applications. In this work, we explain theoretically the decreased convergence rate when using low-level probe noise in the traditional approach, before we propose and study analytically two new probe noise approaches utilizing a combination of specifically designed probe noise signals and probe noise enhancement. Despite using low-level and inaudible probe noise signals, both approaches significantly improve the convergence behavior of the cancellation system compared to the traditional probe noise approach. This makes the proposed approaches much more attractive in practical applications. We demonstrate this through a simulation experiment with audio signals in a hearing aid acoustic feedback cancellation system, where the convergence rate is improved by as much as a factor of 10.",
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Novel Acoustic Feedback Cancellation Approaches In Hearing Aid Applications Using Probe Noise and Probe Noise Enhancement. / Guo, Meng; Jensen, Søren Holdt; Jensen, Jesper.

In: I E E E Transactions on Audio, Speech and Language Processing, Vol. 20, No. 9, 26.06.2012, p. 2549-2563 .

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

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