Nudging young Danish men to eat more vegetables

A food laboratory pilot experiment

Ida Kongsbak, Laurits Rohden Skov, Brit Køpke Nielsen, Maria Wichmann, Hanna Schaldemose, Louise Atkinson, Fie Kathrine Ahlmann, Armando Perez-Cueto

Research output: Contribution to journalConference abstract in journalResearchpeer-review

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Abstract

Objective: This study assessed the combined effect of two choice archi- tectural nudges as a means to increase fruit and vegetable consumption among male university students.
Methodology: This single one-day lunch meal study was conducted in a Food Scape Laboratory. A control group (n=32) and an intervention group (n=33) were recruited to attend an ad libitum self-serve buffet at two different timeslots. Two choice architectural nudges were applied in the intervention group; the fruit and vegetables were placed at the be- ginning of the buffet and separated in eight separate bowls to increase visual variety. The self-served amount (g) of food components was mea- sured using high intelligence equipment.
Results: The amount (g) of self-served fruit and vegetables was significantly higher in the intervention group (p =.005). The total energy consumed (kJ) was significantly lower in the intervention group (p=.01), while there was no significant difference in the total amount (g) of self- served food between the two groups (p=.326).
Key Findings: This study found convincing evidence for the combined effect of two choice architectural nudges as a means to increase the amount of self-served fruit and vegetables among male university students. 8ased on these findings it is suggested that choice architecture could be used as a supplement to already existing strategies in the pro- motion of public health nutrition.
Original languageEnglish
JournalInternational Journal of Community Nutrition
Volume0
Issue numberSupplement
Pages (from-to)38
Number of pages1
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2014
EventWorld Congress of Public Health Nutrition - Las Palmas, Spain
Duration: 9 Nov 201413 Nov 2014
Conference number: 3

Conference

ConferenceWorld Congress of Public Health Nutrition
Number3
CountrySpain
CityLas Palmas
Period09/11/201413/11/2014

Cite this

Kongsbak, I., Skov, L. R., Køpke Nielsen, B., Wichmann, M., Schaldemose, H., Atkinson, L., ... Perez-Cueto, A. (2014). Nudging young Danish men to eat more vegetables: A food laboratory pilot experiment. International Journal of Community Nutrition, 0(Supplement), 38.
Kongsbak, Ida ; Skov, Laurits Rohden ; Køpke Nielsen, Brit ; Wichmann, Maria ; Schaldemose, Hanna ; Atkinson, Louise ; Ahlmann, Fie Kathrine ; Perez-Cueto, Armando. / Nudging young Danish men to eat more vegetables : A food laboratory pilot experiment. In: International Journal of Community Nutrition. 2014 ; Vol. 0, No. Supplement. pp. 38.
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abstract = "Objective: This study assessed the combined effect of two choice archi- tectural nudges as a means to increase fruit and vegetable consumption among male university students.Methodology: This single one-day lunch meal study was conducted in a Food Scape Laboratory. A control group (n=32) and an intervention group (n=33) were recruited to attend an ad libitum self-serve buffet at two different timeslots. Two choice architectural nudges were applied in the intervention group; the fruit and vegetables were placed at the be- ginning of the buffet and separated in eight separate bowls to increase visual variety. The self-served amount (g) of food components was mea- sured using high intelligence equipment.Results: The amount (g) of self-served fruit and vegetables was significantly higher in the intervention group (p =.005). The total energy consumed (kJ) was significantly lower in the intervention group (p=.01), while there was no significant difference in the total amount (g) of self- served food between the two groups (p=.326).Key Findings: This study found convincing evidence for the combined effect of two choice architectural nudges as a means to increase the amount of self-served fruit and vegetables among male university students. 8ased on these findings it is suggested that choice architecture could be used as a supplement to already existing strategies in the pro- motion of public health nutrition.",
author = "Ida Kongsbak and Skov, {Laurits Rohden} and {K{\o}pke Nielsen}, Brit and Maria Wichmann and Hanna Schaldemose and Louise Atkinson and Ahlmann, {Fie Kathrine} and Armando Perez-Cueto",
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Kongsbak, I, Skov, LR, Køpke Nielsen, B, Wichmann, M, Schaldemose, H, Atkinson, L, Ahlmann, FK & Perez-Cueto, A 2014, 'Nudging young Danish men to eat more vegetables: A food laboratory pilot experiment', International Journal of Community Nutrition, vol. 0, no. Supplement, pp. 38.

Nudging young Danish men to eat more vegetables : A food laboratory pilot experiment. / Kongsbak, Ida; Skov, Laurits Rohden; Køpke Nielsen, Brit; Wichmann, Maria; Schaldemose, Hanna; Atkinson, Louise; Ahlmann, Fie Kathrine; Perez-Cueto, Armando.

In: International Journal of Community Nutrition, Vol. 0, No. Supplement, 11.2014, p. 38.

Research output: Contribution to journalConference abstract in journalResearchpeer-review

TY - ABST

T1 - Nudging young Danish men to eat more vegetables

T2 - A food laboratory pilot experiment

AU - Kongsbak, Ida

AU - Skov, Laurits Rohden

AU - Køpke Nielsen, Brit

AU - Wichmann, Maria

AU - Schaldemose, Hanna

AU - Atkinson, Louise

AU - Ahlmann, Fie Kathrine

AU - Perez-Cueto, Armando

PY - 2014/11

Y1 - 2014/11

N2 - Objective: This study assessed the combined effect of two choice archi- tectural nudges as a means to increase fruit and vegetable consumption among male university students.Methodology: This single one-day lunch meal study was conducted in a Food Scape Laboratory. A control group (n=32) and an intervention group (n=33) were recruited to attend an ad libitum self-serve buffet at two different timeslots. Two choice architectural nudges were applied in the intervention group; the fruit and vegetables were placed at the be- ginning of the buffet and separated in eight separate bowls to increase visual variety. The self-served amount (g) of food components was mea- sured using high intelligence equipment.Results: The amount (g) of self-served fruit and vegetables was significantly higher in the intervention group (p =.005). The total energy consumed (kJ) was significantly lower in the intervention group (p=.01), while there was no significant difference in the total amount (g) of self- served food between the two groups (p=.326).Key Findings: This study found convincing evidence for the combined effect of two choice architectural nudges as a means to increase the amount of self-served fruit and vegetables among male university students. 8ased on these findings it is suggested that choice architecture could be used as a supplement to already existing strategies in the pro- motion of public health nutrition.

AB - Objective: This study assessed the combined effect of two choice archi- tectural nudges as a means to increase fruit and vegetable consumption among male university students.Methodology: This single one-day lunch meal study was conducted in a Food Scape Laboratory. A control group (n=32) and an intervention group (n=33) were recruited to attend an ad libitum self-serve buffet at two different timeslots. Two choice architectural nudges were applied in the intervention group; the fruit and vegetables were placed at the be- ginning of the buffet and separated in eight separate bowls to increase visual variety. The self-served amount (g) of food components was mea- sured using high intelligence equipment.Results: The amount (g) of self-served fruit and vegetables was significantly higher in the intervention group (p =.005). The total energy consumed (kJ) was significantly lower in the intervention group (p=.01), while there was no significant difference in the total amount (g) of self- served food between the two groups (p=.326).Key Findings: This study found convincing evidence for the combined effect of two choice architectural nudges as a means to increase the amount of self-served fruit and vegetables among male university students. 8ased on these findings it is suggested that choice architecture could be used as a supplement to already existing strategies in the pro- motion of public health nutrition.

M3 - Conference abstract in journal

VL - 0

SP - 38

JO - International Journal of Community Nutrition

JF - International Journal of Community Nutrition

SN - 2386-673X

IS - Supplement

ER -

Kongsbak I, Skov LR, Køpke Nielsen B, Wichmann M, Schaldemose H, Atkinson L et al. Nudging young Danish men to eat more vegetables: A food laboratory pilot experiment. International Journal of Community Nutrition. 2014 Nov;0(Supplement):38.