Oil Extraction and Benefit Sharing in an Illiberal Context: The Nenets and Komi-Izhemtsi Indigenous Peoples in the Russian Arctic

Maria Tysiachniouk, Laura A. Henry, Machiel Lamers, Jan P.M van Tatenhove

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

8 Citations (Scopus)
142 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

How can indigenous communities in illiberal regimes benefit from oil
production? This paper compares the experience of two indigenous
peoples in the Russian Arctic, the Nenets and the Komi-Izhemtsi, in their
quest for environmental protection and the development of benefitsharing
arrangements with Lukoil, a Russian oil company. The Nenets
people, recognized by the Russian state as indigenous, are marginalized
political actors who identified a route to receiving compensation for
loss of land and damage to the environment as well as economic
benefits under the auspices of Russian law and Lukoil’s corporate
policies. In contrast, the Komi-Izhemtsi, despite indigenous status in
global institutions including the United Nations and the Arctic Council,
are unrecognized as indigenous domestically and initially received no
compensation. Their path to benefit sharing was more challenging as
they partnered with local nongovernmental organizations and global
environmentalists to pressure Lukoil to sign a benefit-sharing agreement.
Ultimately, the comparison illustrates how transnational partnerships
can empower indigenous people to gain benefits from natural
resource exploitation even in illiberal political systems.
Original languageEnglish
JournalSociety and Natural Resources
Volume31
Issue number5
Pages (from-to)556-579
Number of pages25
ISSN0894-1920
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018

Cite this

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title = "Oil Extraction and Benefit Sharing in an Illiberal Context: The Nenets and Komi-Izhemtsi Indigenous Peoples in the Russian Arctic",
abstract = "How can indigenous communities in illiberal regimes benefit from oilproduction? This paper compares the experience of two indigenouspeoples in the Russian Arctic, the Nenets and the Komi-Izhemtsi, in theirquest for environmental protection and the development of benefitsharingarrangements with Lukoil, a Russian oil company. The Nenetspeople, recognized by the Russian state as indigenous, are marginalizedpolitical actors who identified a route to receiving compensation forloss of land and damage to the environment as well as economicbenefits under the auspices of Russian law and Lukoil’s corporatepolicies. In contrast, the Komi-Izhemtsi, despite indigenous status inglobal institutions including the United Nations and the Arctic Council,are unrecognized as indigenous domestically and initially received nocompensation. Their path to benefit sharing was more challenging asthey partnered with local nongovernmental organizations and globalenvironmentalists to pressure Lukoil to sign a benefit-sharing agreement.Ultimately, the comparison illustrates how transnational partnershipscan empower indigenous people to gain benefits from naturalresource exploitation even in illiberal political systems.",
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Oil Extraction and Benefit Sharing in an Illiberal Context : The Nenets and Komi-Izhemtsi Indigenous Peoples in the Russian Arctic. / Tysiachniouk, Maria; Henry, Laura A. ; Lamers, Machiel ; Tatenhove, Jan P.M van.

In: Society and Natural Resources, Vol. 31, No. 5, 2018, p. 556-579.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

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AB - How can indigenous communities in illiberal regimes benefit from oilproduction? This paper compares the experience of two indigenouspeoples in the Russian Arctic, the Nenets and the Komi-Izhemtsi, in theirquest for environmental protection and the development of benefitsharingarrangements with Lukoil, a Russian oil company. The Nenetspeople, recognized by the Russian state as indigenous, are marginalizedpolitical actors who identified a route to receiving compensation forloss of land and damage to the environment as well as economicbenefits under the auspices of Russian law and Lukoil’s corporatepolicies. In contrast, the Komi-Izhemtsi, despite indigenous status inglobal institutions including the United Nations and the Arctic Council,are unrecognized as indigenous domestically and initially received nocompensation. Their path to benefit sharing was more challenging asthey partnered with local nongovernmental organizations and globalenvironmentalists to pressure Lukoil to sign a benefit-sharing agreement.Ultimately, the comparison illustrates how transnational partnershipscan empower indigenous people to gain benefits from naturalresource exploitation even in illiberal political systems.

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