Pathogenicity gene variations within the order Entomophthorales

Morten Nedergaard Grell, Annette Bruun Jensen, Lene Lange

Research output: Contribution to conference without publisher/journalPosterResearch

Abstract

Fungi within the order Entomophthorales (subphylum Entomophthoromycotina) are obligate biotrophic pathogens of arthropods with a remarkable narrow host range. Infection takes place through the cuticle when conidia hit a susceptible host, facilitated by enzymatic and mechanical mechanisms. In the hemolymph, they proliferate as hyphal bodies or cell wall-less protoplasts for easy nutrient uptake and host immune response avoidance. Entomophthoralean fungi often manipulate their host to seek an elevated position shortly before host death in order to optimize disease transmission. After host death, conidia are produced and discharged when humidity gets high—usually during night. In an earlier secretome study of field-collected grain aphids (Sitobion avenae) infected with entomophthoralean fungi, a number of pathogenesis-related, secreted enzymes were discovered (Fungal Genetics and Biology 2011, vol. 48, 343–352). Among these were cuticle degrading serine proteases and chitinases, involved in fungal penetration of the aphid cuticle, and a number of lipases most likely involved in nutrient acquisition. In the current study, we are investigating the distribution and variation of selected pathogenicity genes within genera Entomophthora and Pandora, using fungal genomic DNA originating from field-collected, infected insect host species of dipteran (flies, mosquitoes) or hemipteran (aphid) origin.

Original languageEnglish
Publication date2012
Publication statusPublished - 2012
EventECFG11: 11th European Conference on Fungal Genetics - Marburg, Germany
Duration: 30 Mar 20122 Apr 2012

Conference

ConferenceECFG11: 11th European Conference on Fungal Genetics
CountryGermany
CityMarburg
Period30/03/201202/04/2012

Fingerprint

Entomophthorales
pathogenicity
Aphidoidea
genes
Entomophthoromycotina
fungi
conidia
Pandora (fungi)
Entomophthora
death
microbial genetics
Sitobion avenae
serine proteinases
disease transmission
chitinase
integument
host range
nutrient uptake
protoplasts
hemolymph

Cite this

Grell, M. N., Jensen, A. B., & Lange, L. (2012). Pathogenicity gene variations within the order Entomophthorales. Poster presented at ECFG11: 11th European Conference on Fungal Genetics, Marburg, Germany.
Grell, Morten Nedergaard ; Jensen, Annette Bruun ; Lange, Lene. / Pathogenicity gene variations within the order Entomophthorales. Poster presented at ECFG11: 11th European Conference on Fungal Genetics, Marburg, Germany.
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Grell, MN, Jensen, AB & Lange, L 2012, 'Pathogenicity gene variations within the order Entomophthorales' ECFG11: 11th European Conference on Fungal Genetics, Marburg, Germany, 30/03/2012 - 02/04/2012, .

Pathogenicity gene variations within the order Entomophthorales. / Grell, Morten Nedergaard; Jensen, Annette Bruun; Lange, Lene.

2012. Poster presented at ECFG11: 11th European Conference on Fungal Genetics, Marburg, Germany.

Research output: Contribution to conference without publisher/journalPosterResearch

TY - CONF

T1 - Pathogenicity gene variations within the order Entomophthorales

AU - Grell, Morten Nedergaard

AU - Jensen, Annette Bruun

AU - Lange, Lene

PY - 2012

Y1 - 2012

N2 - Fungi within the order Entomophthorales (subphylum Entomophthoromycotina) are obligate biotrophic pathogens of arthropods with a remarkable narrow host range. Infection takes place through the cuticle when conidia hit a susceptible host, facilitated by enzymatic and mechanical mechanisms. In the hemolymph, they proliferate as hyphal bodies or cell wall-less protoplasts for easy nutrient uptake and host immune response avoidance. Entomophthoralean fungi often manipulate their host to seek an elevated position shortly before host death in order to optimize disease transmission. After host death, conidia are produced and discharged when humidity gets high—usually during night. In an earlier secretome study of field-collected grain aphids (Sitobion avenae) infected with entomophthoralean fungi, a number of pathogenesis-related, secreted enzymes were discovered (Fungal Genetics and Biology 2011, vol. 48, 343–352). Among these were cuticle degrading serine proteases and chitinases, involved in fungal penetration of the aphid cuticle, and a number of lipases most likely involved in nutrient acquisition. In the current study, we are investigating the distribution and variation of selected pathogenicity genes within genera Entomophthora and Pandora, using fungal genomic DNA originating from field-collected, infected insect host species of dipteran (flies, mosquitoes) or hemipteran (aphid) origin.

AB - Fungi within the order Entomophthorales (subphylum Entomophthoromycotina) are obligate biotrophic pathogens of arthropods with a remarkable narrow host range. Infection takes place through the cuticle when conidia hit a susceptible host, facilitated by enzymatic and mechanical mechanisms. In the hemolymph, they proliferate as hyphal bodies or cell wall-less protoplasts for easy nutrient uptake and host immune response avoidance. Entomophthoralean fungi often manipulate their host to seek an elevated position shortly before host death in order to optimize disease transmission. After host death, conidia are produced and discharged when humidity gets high—usually during night. In an earlier secretome study of field-collected grain aphids (Sitobion avenae) infected with entomophthoralean fungi, a number of pathogenesis-related, secreted enzymes were discovered (Fungal Genetics and Biology 2011, vol. 48, 343–352). Among these were cuticle degrading serine proteases and chitinases, involved in fungal penetration of the aphid cuticle, and a number of lipases most likely involved in nutrient acquisition. In the current study, we are investigating the distribution and variation of selected pathogenicity genes within genera Entomophthora and Pandora, using fungal genomic DNA originating from field-collected, infected insect host species of dipteran (flies, mosquitoes) or hemipteran (aphid) origin.

M3 - Poster

ER -

Grell MN, Jensen AB, Lange L. Pathogenicity gene variations within the order Entomophthorales. 2012. Poster presented at ECFG11: 11th European Conference on Fungal Genetics, Marburg, Germany.