Personalized Rheumatic Medicine through Dose Reduction Reduces the Cost of Biological Treatment – a retrospective intervention analysis

Michael Kruse Meyer, Marlene Andersen, Troels Ring, Lars Holger Ehlers, Grethe Neumann Andersen, Claus Rasmussen, Allan Stensballe

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

1 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Abstract

Objective: The effects of a dose-reduction intervention of biological disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (bDMARDs) in patients in remission were analysed with epidemiology and health economics strategies. The aims were to analyse changes in bDMARD dosage, evaluate potential disease worsening, and estimate cost reduction. Method: This uncontrolled single-centre observational study analysed bDMARD-treated patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), psoriatic arthritis (PsA), and spondyloarthritis (SpA). bDMARD expenditure constituted a proxy for bDMARD doses, which enabled group-level analysis. Interrupted time-series regression was used to analyse changes in treatment cost due to the dose reduction. Disease activity and treatment durations were monitored to investigate disease worsening. Results: In total, 997 biological treatment cases were analysed. This involved 527 bDMARD patients, where an unknown fraction of patients was given reduced doses. Disease activity of RA and PsA patients decreased from 2001 to 2009 and remained stable after that, while disease activity for SpA patients was unchanged, indicating no disease worsening from the intervention. The dose tapering resulted in decreased bDMARD expenditure, indicating a decrease in bDMARD consumption, which led to an accumulated cost reduction of 4 178 000 EUR. Conclusions: The results suggest that dose reduction can be safely performed in patients in treatment remission on a group level without compromising treatment efficacy. Subcutaneous bDMARDs, including abatacept, adalimumab, and etanercept, were observed to be well suited to customizing dosage. This study highlights the potential for individualized and personalized rheumatic medicine by providing dose reduction to individual patients, while monitoring disease activity.
Original languageEnglish
JournalScandinavian Journal of Rheumatology
ISSN0300-9742
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019

Fingerprint

Precision Medicine
Health Care Costs
Antirheumatic Agents
Psoriatic Arthritis
Health Expenditures
Rheumatoid Arthritis
Costs and Cost Analysis
Physiologic Monitoring
Proxy

Cite this

@article{a27f0f03c0bb4f20a663fd69733cf873,
title = "Personalized Rheumatic Medicine through Dose Reduction Reduces the Cost of Biological Treatment – a retrospective intervention analysis",
abstract = "AbstractObjective: The effects of a dose-reduction intervention of biological disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (bDMARDs) in patients in remission were analysed with epidemiology and health economics strategies. The aims were to analyse changes in bDMARD dosage, evaluate potential disease worsening, and estimate cost reduction. Method: This uncontrolled single-centre observational study analysed bDMARD-treated patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), psoriatic arthritis (PsA), and spondyloarthritis (SpA). bDMARD expenditure constituted a proxy for bDMARD doses, which enabled group-level analysis. Interrupted time-series regression was used to analyse changes in treatment cost due to the dose reduction. Disease activity and treatment durations were monitored to investigate disease worsening. Results: In total, 997 biological treatment cases were analysed. This involved 527 bDMARD patients, where an unknown fraction of patients was given reduced doses. Disease activity of RA and PsA patients decreased from 2001 to 2009 and remained stable after that, while disease activity for SpA patients was unchanged, indicating no disease worsening from the intervention. The dose tapering resulted in decreased bDMARD expenditure, indicating a decrease in bDMARD consumption, which led to an accumulated cost reduction of 4 178 000 EUR. Conclusions: The results suggest that dose reduction can be safely performed in patients in treatment remission on a group level without compromising treatment efficacy. Subcutaneous bDMARDs, including abatacept, adalimumab, and etanercept, were observed to be well suited to customizing dosage. This study highlights the potential for individualized and personalized rheumatic medicine by providing dose reduction to individual patients, while monitoring disease activity.",
author = "Meyer, {Michael Kruse} and Marlene Andersen and Troels Ring and Ehlers, {Lars Holger} and Andersen, {Grethe Neumann} and Claus Rasmussen and Allan Stensballe",
year = "2019",
doi = "10.1080/03009742.2019.1585940",
language = "English",
journal = "Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology",
issn = "0300-9742",
publisher = "Taylor & Francis",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Personalized Rheumatic Medicine through Dose Reduction Reduces the Cost of Biological Treatment – a retrospective intervention analysis

AU - Meyer, Michael Kruse

AU - Andersen, Marlene

AU - Ring, Troels

AU - Ehlers, Lars Holger

AU - Andersen, Grethe Neumann

AU - Rasmussen, Claus

AU - Stensballe, Allan

PY - 2019

Y1 - 2019

N2 - AbstractObjective: The effects of a dose-reduction intervention of biological disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (bDMARDs) in patients in remission were analysed with epidemiology and health economics strategies. The aims were to analyse changes in bDMARD dosage, evaluate potential disease worsening, and estimate cost reduction. Method: This uncontrolled single-centre observational study analysed bDMARD-treated patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), psoriatic arthritis (PsA), and spondyloarthritis (SpA). bDMARD expenditure constituted a proxy for bDMARD doses, which enabled group-level analysis. Interrupted time-series regression was used to analyse changes in treatment cost due to the dose reduction. Disease activity and treatment durations were monitored to investigate disease worsening. Results: In total, 997 biological treatment cases were analysed. This involved 527 bDMARD patients, where an unknown fraction of patients was given reduced doses. Disease activity of RA and PsA patients decreased from 2001 to 2009 and remained stable after that, while disease activity for SpA patients was unchanged, indicating no disease worsening from the intervention. The dose tapering resulted in decreased bDMARD expenditure, indicating a decrease in bDMARD consumption, which led to an accumulated cost reduction of 4 178 000 EUR. Conclusions: The results suggest that dose reduction can be safely performed in patients in treatment remission on a group level without compromising treatment efficacy. Subcutaneous bDMARDs, including abatacept, adalimumab, and etanercept, were observed to be well suited to customizing dosage. This study highlights the potential for individualized and personalized rheumatic medicine by providing dose reduction to individual patients, while monitoring disease activity.

AB - AbstractObjective: The effects of a dose-reduction intervention of biological disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (bDMARDs) in patients in remission were analysed with epidemiology and health economics strategies. The aims were to analyse changes in bDMARD dosage, evaluate potential disease worsening, and estimate cost reduction. Method: This uncontrolled single-centre observational study analysed bDMARD-treated patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), psoriatic arthritis (PsA), and spondyloarthritis (SpA). bDMARD expenditure constituted a proxy for bDMARD doses, which enabled group-level analysis. Interrupted time-series regression was used to analyse changes in treatment cost due to the dose reduction. Disease activity and treatment durations were monitored to investigate disease worsening. Results: In total, 997 biological treatment cases were analysed. This involved 527 bDMARD patients, where an unknown fraction of patients was given reduced doses. Disease activity of RA and PsA patients decreased from 2001 to 2009 and remained stable after that, while disease activity for SpA patients was unchanged, indicating no disease worsening from the intervention. The dose tapering resulted in decreased bDMARD expenditure, indicating a decrease in bDMARD consumption, which led to an accumulated cost reduction of 4 178 000 EUR. Conclusions: The results suggest that dose reduction can be safely performed in patients in treatment remission on a group level without compromising treatment efficacy. Subcutaneous bDMARDs, including abatacept, adalimumab, and etanercept, were observed to be well suited to customizing dosage. This study highlights the potential for individualized and personalized rheumatic medicine by providing dose reduction to individual patients, while monitoring disease activity.

U2 - 10.1080/03009742.2019.1585940

DO - 10.1080/03009742.2019.1585940

M3 - Journal article

JO - Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology

JF - Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology

SN - 0300-9742

ER -