Pork in good company? Exploratory analysis of side dishes, beverages, foodscapes and individual characteristics

Wim Verbeke, Federico J.A. Perez-Cueto, Marcia Dutra de Barcellos, Klaus G Grunert

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The objective of this study is to explore the association between pork as the main meal component and the choice for side dishes and beverages depending on foodscape and individual characteristics, including overweight and obesity among fresh pork consumers (n = 2156) in five European countries (Belgium, Denmark, Germany, Greece and Poland). Males were found to combine pork more with caloric drinking (odds ratio = 1.32) and low levels of vegetable intake (odds ratio = 1.32) compared to females. Younger consumers were more likely to combine pork with low levels of vegetable intake but less likely to combine pork with sauces or condiments. Heavy users of pork were more likely (odds ratio = 1.43) to combine pork with sauces or condiments. The study also found an association between being overweight or obese and higher consumption of carbohydrate rich sta- ple foods (odds ratio = 1.30) and caloric drinks (odds ratio = 1.30) as side dishes to pork meat. Substantial cross-cultural differences were revealed in line with typical pork consumption and meal composition habits in the respective countries. Finally, this study found that the company of family plays a significant role when choos- ing side dishes for pork as meal center, thus constituting a relevant venue for the positioning and marketing of pork, as well as for future public health information about meals with pork as main meal component.
Original languageEnglish
JournalMeat Science
Volume95
Issue number3
Pages (from-to)694-698
Number of pages5
ISSN0309-1740
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2013

Keywords

  • Consumer
  • Meal
  • Pork
  • Side dishes
  • Vegetables

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