Sociological perspectives on Islamist radicalization – bridging the micro/macro gap

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Radicalization research has been characterized by a sharp opposition between micro and macro perspectives. This article discusses three existing theoretical perspectives and argues that they may bridge the micro/macro gap. A masculinity, gender and intersectionality perspective can help analyse radicalization as a strategy for remasculinization by situating feelings of emasculation in a broader societal frame. A neo-Birminghamian conception of subculture relates individual and group processes to a broader social context by viewing radicalization as an oppositional answer to a shared situation of social and economic marginalization, and othering. Sociology of religious emotions provides an understanding of how emotional outcomes of social marginality can be transformed into individual religious emotions within radical Islamist groups.

Original languageEnglish
JournalEuropean Journal of Criminology
ISSN1477-3708
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 30 May 2019

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radicalization
emotion
intersectionality
marginality
subculture
masculinity
sociology
opposition
Group
gender
economics

Cite this

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title = "Sociological perspectives on Islamist radicalization – bridging the micro/macro gap",
abstract = "Radicalization research has been characterized by a sharp opposition between micro and macro perspectives. This article discusses three existing theoretical perspectives and argues that they may bridge the micro/macro gap. A masculinity, gender and intersectionality perspective can help analyse radicalization as a strategy for remasculinization by situating feelings of emasculation in a broader societal frame. A neo-Birminghamian conception of subculture relates individual and group processes to a broader social context by viewing radicalization as an oppositional answer to a shared situation of social and economic marginalization, and othering. Sociology of religious emotions provides an understanding of how emotional outcomes of social marginality can be transformed into individual religious emotions within radical Islamist groups.",
author = "Jensen, {Sune Qvotrup} and Larsen, {Jeppe Fuglsang}",
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Sociological perspectives on Islamist radicalization – bridging the micro/macro gap. / Jensen, Sune Qvotrup; Larsen, Jeppe Fuglsang.

In: European Journal of Criminology, 30.05.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

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AU - Larsen, Jeppe Fuglsang

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N2 - Radicalization research has been characterized by a sharp opposition between micro and macro perspectives. This article discusses three existing theoretical perspectives and argues that they may bridge the micro/macro gap. A masculinity, gender and intersectionality perspective can help analyse radicalization as a strategy for remasculinization by situating feelings of emasculation in a broader societal frame. A neo-Birminghamian conception of subculture relates individual and group processes to a broader social context by viewing radicalization as an oppositional answer to a shared situation of social and economic marginalization, and othering. Sociology of religious emotions provides an understanding of how emotional outcomes of social marginality can be transformed into individual religious emotions within radical Islamist groups.

AB - Radicalization research has been characterized by a sharp opposition between micro and macro perspectives. This article discusses three existing theoretical perspectives and argues that they may bridge the micro/macro gap. A masculinity, gender and intersectionality perspective can help analyse radicalization as a strategy for remasculinization by situating feelings of emasculation in a broader societal frame. A neo-Birminghamian conception of subculture relates individual and group processes to a broader social context by viewing radicalization as an oppositional answer to a shared situation of social and economic marginalization, and othering. Sociology of religious emotions provides an understanding of how emotional outcomes of social marginality can be transformed into individual religious emotions within radical Islamist groups.

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M3 - Journal article

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