Studies of Immigrant Crime in Denmark

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Do the results of research on the relationship between crime and immigration status differ depending on the type of data examined? This question is posed and answered affirmatively in a paper based on a systematic review of ten Danish studies published between 2008 and 2017. The current review is motivated by the seemingly widespread perception that immigrants/descendants are at greater risk for committing crime than others even after adjusting for systematic differences between these groups. Using five criteria of relevance, a systematic search resulted in the identification of ten pertinent studies. The ten studies are reviewed in the current paper and form the basis of the conclusion that research results differ markedly depending on the type of data examined. This implies that public perceptions about crime and immigration status may rest on shaky ground. Five potential explanations are suggested to explain the inconsistencies found in the studies reviewed. Finally, five recommendations for future research are suggested in order move research forward.
Original languageEnglish
JournalNordic Journal of Criminology
ISSN2578-983x
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 10 Dec 2019

Fingerprint

Denmark
immigrant
offense
immigration
research results
Group

Keywords

  • Immigrants
  • descendants
  • minorities
  • register study
  • self-report
  • youth crime
  • review
  • Denmark

Cite this

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title = "Studies of Immigrant Crime in Denmark",
abstract = "Do the results of research on the relationship between crime and immigration status differ depending on the type of data examined? This question is posed and answered affirmatively in a paper based on a systematic review of ten Danish studies published between 2008 and 2017. The current review is motivated by the seemingly widespread perception that immigrants/descendants are at greater risk for committing crime than others even after adjusting for systematic differences between these groups. Using five criteria of relevance, a systematic search resulted in the identification of ten pertinent studies. The ten studies are reviewed in the current paper and form the basis of the conclusion that research results differ markedly depending on the type of data examined. This implies that public perceptions about crime and immigration status may rest on shaky ground. Five potential explanations are suggested to explain the inconsistencies found in the studies reviewed. Finally, five recommendations for future research are suggested in order move research forward.",
keywords = "Immigrants, descendants, minorities, register study, self-report, youth crime, review, Denmark",
author = "Christian Klement",
year = "2019",
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language = "English",
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Studies of Immigrant Crime in Denmark. / Klement, Christian.

In: Nordic Journal of Criminology, 10.12.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Studies of Immigrant Crime in Denmark

AU - Klement, Christian

PY - 2019/12/10

Y1 - 2019/12/10

N2 - Do the results of research on the relationship between crime and immigration status differ depending on the type of data examined? This question is posed and answered affirmatively in a paper based on a systematic review of ten Danish studies published between 2008 and 2017. The current review is motivated by the seemingly widespread perception that immigrants/descendants are at greater risk for committing crime than others even after adjusting for systematic differences between these groups. Using five criteria of relevance, a systematic search resulted in the identification of ten pertinent studies. The ten studies are reviewed in the current paper and form the basis of the conclusion that research results differ markedly depending on the type of data examined. This implies that public perceptions about crime and immigration status may rest on shaky ground. Five potential explanations are suggested to explain the inconsistencies found in the studies reviewed. Finally, five recommendations for future research are suggested in order move research forward.

AB - Do the results of research on the relationship between crime and immigration status differ depending on the type of data examined? This question is posed and answered affirmatively in a paper based on a systematic review of ten Danish studies published between 2008 and 2017. The current review is motivated by the seemingly widespread perception that immigrants/descendants are at greater risk for committing crime than others even after adjusting for systematic differences between these groups. Using five criteria of relevance, a systematic search resulted in the identification of ten pertinent studies. The ten studies are reviewed in the current paper and form the basis of the conclusion that research results differ markedly depending on the type of data examined. This implies that public perceptions about crime and immigration status may rest on shaky ground. Five potential explanations are suggested to explain the inconsistencies found in the studies reviewed. Finally, five recommendations for future research are suggested in order move research forward.

KW - Immigrants

KW - descendants

KW - minorities

KW - register study

KW - self-report

KW - youth crime

KW - review

KW - Denmark

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M3 - Journal article

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JF - Nordic Journal of Criminology

SN - 2578-983x

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