Studying constructions of national identity across historical settings

from loyalty to trust as the prime marker of Danish civilization

Christian Ydesen, Trine Øland

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

This article aims to demonstrate how constructions of national identity can be studied across historical settings. In this sense, the article contributes knowledge about how Danish-ness is constructed in two historical settings characterized by great upheavals in popular moral codes, culture, and national self-imagery. The first setting is the first decade after World War II and the second setting is the post-9/11 era. The empirical focus is based on sources pertaining to the way police officers and related professionals of the Danish welfare nation-state construct disturbing behavior and how these constructions are made into categories that activate an array of interventions. Using a comparative outlook between the two historical settings and by putting theoretically guided questions to work empirically, the purpose of this article is to understand 1) the boundaries of legitimate behavior and membership of the Danish community inside the Danish welfare nation-state, and 2) the transformations of these boundaries according to the Danish state’s changing (inter-state) relations within the regional and global community. After an introduction that discusses the historiographical landscape of studies in national identity, we clarify the theoretically guided questions that will be put to work in the analyses. Next, we describe the methodology and empirical material of the two historical settings, then follows the analyses of the two historical settings, and finally, we present an analytical discussion featuring a comparative outlook between the two historical settings that serves as the conclusion and sums up the main findings of the article.
Original languageEnglish
JournalHistory of Education
ISSN0046-760X
Publication statusSubmitted - 5 Jan 2019

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loyalty
civilization
national identity
nation state
welfare
police officer
World War II
community
methodology
Nation-state
Loyalty
Civilization
National Identity
Police
Imagery
September 11 Attacks
Second World War
Methodology

Cite this

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title = "Studying constructions of national identity across historical settings: from loyalty to trust as the prime marker of Danish civilization",
abstract = "This article aims to demonstrate how constructions of national identity can be studied across historical settings. In this sense, the article contributes knowledge about how Danish-ness is constructed in two historical settings characterized by great upheavals in popular moral codes, culture, and national self-imagery. The first setting is the first decade after World War II and the second setting is the post-9/11 era. The empirical focus is based on sources pertaining to the way police officers and related professionals of the Danish welfare nation-state construct disturbing behavior and how these constructions are made into categories that activate an array of interventions. Using a comparative outlook between the two historical settings and by putting theoretically guided questions to work empirically, the purpose of this article is to understand 1) the boundaries of legitimate behavior and membership of the Danish community inside the Danish welfare nation-state, and 2) the transformations of these boundaries according to the Danish state’s changing (inter-state) relations within the regional and global community. After an introduction that discusses the historiographical landscape of studies in national identity, we clarify the theoretically guided questions that will be put to work in the analyses. Next, we describe the methodology and empirical material of the two historical settings, then follows the analyses of the two historical settings, and finally, we present an analytical discussion featuring a comparative outlook between the two historical settings that serves as the conclusion and sums up the main findings of the article.",
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Studying constructions of national identity across historical settings : from loyalty to trust as the prime marker of Danish civilization. / Ydesen, Christian; Øland, Trine.

In: History of Education, 05.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

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AB - This article aims to demonstrate how constructions of national identity can be studied across historical settings. In this sense, the article contributes knowledge about how Danish-ness is constructed in two historical settings characterized by great upheavals in popular moral codes, culture, and national self-imagery. The first setting is the first decade after World War II and the second setting is the post-9/11 era. The empirical focus is based on sources pertaining to the way police officers and related professionals of the Danish welfare nation-state construct disturbing behavior and how these constructions are made into categories that activate an array of interventions. Using a comparative outlook between the two historical settings and by putting theoretically guided questions to work empirically, the purpose of this article is to understand 1) the boundaries of legitimate behavior and membership of the Danish community inside the Danish welfare nation-state, and 2) the transformations of these boundaries according to the Danish state’s changing (inter-state) relations within the regional and global community. After an introduction that discusses the historiographical landscape of studies in national identity, we clarify the theoretically guided questions that will be put to work in the analyses. Next, we describe the methodology and empirical material of the two historical settings, then follows the analyses of the two historical settings, and finally, we present an analytical discussion featuring a comparative outlook between the two historical settings that serves as the conclusion and sums up the main findings of the article.

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