The Architectural Question of Vandhalla – to Compensate or to Stimulate?

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Abstract

In a Danish context, people with mobility impairments suffer from poor health
compared with the rest of the population. They weigh more, exercise less
and participate less in the cultural and social activities of everyday life. However,
persons with disabilities, who are active in sports, are significantly
more often employed, engaged in civic and voluntary activities and have a
higher educational level compared with other persons with disabilities. In
other words, participation in physical activities increases participation in other
fields of society and functions as a lever for individual health and wellbeing.
Egmont, a Danish folk high school has already acknowledged the effect of
sport in its work on rehabilitation, habilitation, health and well-being. Egmont
is open to everyone but a majority of the students are persons with physical
disabilities. In 2013 the new sport centre Vandhalla, which offers numerous
new activities was opened. Using Vandhalla as a case, this article discusses
how universal design in architecture can support the process of habilitation.
Traditionally, accessible design intends to compensate for disabilities, but at
Vandhalla the architecture stimulates rather than compensates. Hence the
universal design of architecture inspires and supports activities as well as
the student’s abilities to be self-reliant. Furthermore it increases the sense of
joy among the students which can be documented in ever-widening circles in
their perceived quality of life.
Empirically, this paper is primarily based on a post-occupancy evaluation of
Vandhalla. Interviews and walk-throughs were conducted with the winning
team, the client, the teachers and the students. Data from other research
projects conducted by the authors are included as examples.
The concept of ‘A Challenging Space’ is introduced and used as an analytical
framework.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationARCH17 Conference proceedings : 3rd international conference on architecture, research, care and health.
EditorsNanet Mathiasen, Anne Kathrine Frandsen
Number of pages15
PublisherPolyteknisk Boghandel og Forlag
Publication date26 Apr 2017
Pages316-330
ISBN (Electronic)978-87-93585-00-3
Publication statusPublished - 26 Apr 2017
Event ARCH17 - The 3rd International Conference on Architecture, Research, Care and Health: 3rd international conference on architecture, research, care and health - Aalborg Universitet, A.C. Meyers Vænge 15, København, Denmark
Duration: 26 Apr 201727 Apr 2017
Conference number: 3
http://www.arch17.aau.dk
http://www.arch17.aau.dk/

Conference

Conference ARCH17 - The 3rd International Conference on Architecture, Research, Care and Health
Number3
LocationAalborg Universitet, A.C. Meyers Vænge 15
CountryDenmark
CityKøbenhavn
Period26/04/201727/04/2017
Internet address

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Habilitation
disability
human being
Sports
student
participation
health
everyday life
rehabilitation
quality of life
well-being
ability
teacher
interview
evaluation
school
Society

Cite this

Grangaard, S., & Ryhl, C. (2017). The Architectural Question of Vandhalla – to Compensate or to Stimulate? In N. Mathiasen, & A. K. Frandsen (Eds.), ARCH17 Conference proceedings: 3rd international conference on architecture, research, care and health. (pp. 316-330). Polyteknisk Boghandel og Forlag.
Grangaard, Sidse ; Ryhl, Camilla. / The Architectural Question of Vandhalla – to Compensate or to Stimulate?. ARCH17 Conference proceedings: 3rd international conference on architecture, research, care and health.. editor / Nanet Mathiasen ; Anne Kathrine Frandsen. Polyteknisk Boghandel og Forlag, 2017. pp. 316-330
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abstract = "In a Danish context, people with mobility impairments suffer from poor healthcompared with the rest of the population. They weigh more, exercise lessand participate less in the cultural and social activities of everyday life. However,persons with disabilities, who are active in sports, are significantlymore often employed, engaged in civic and voluntary activities and have ahigher educational level compared with other persons with disabilities. Inother words, participation in physical activities increases participation in otherfields of society and functions as a lever for individual health and wellbeing.Egmont, a Danish folk high school has already acknowledged the effect ofsport in its work on rehabilitation, habilitation, health and well-being. Egmontis open to everyone but a majority of the students are persons with physicaldisabilities. In 2013 the new sport centre Vandhalla, which offers numerousnew activities was opened. Using Vandhalla as a case, this article discusseshow universal design in architecture can support the process of habilitation.Traditionally, accessible design intends to compensate for disabilities, but atVandhalla the architecture stimulates rather than compensates. Hence theuniversal design of architecture inspires and supports activities as well asthe student’s abilities to be self-reliant. Furthermore it increases the sense ofjoy among the students which can be documented in ever-widening circles intheir perceived quality of life.Empirically, this paper is primarily based on a post-occupancy evaluation ofVandhalla. Interviews and walk-throughs were conducted with the winningteam, the client, the teachers and the students. Data from other researchprojects conducted by the authors are included as examples.The concept of ‘A Challenging Space’ is introduced and used as an analyticalframework.",
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Grangaard, S & Ryhl, C 2017, The Architectural Question of Vandhalla – to Compensate or to Stimulate? in N Mathiasen & AK Frandsen (eds), ARCH17 Conference proceedings: 3rd international conference on architecture, research, care and health.. Polyteknisk Boghandel og Forlag, pp. 316-330, ARCH17 - The 3rd International Conference on Architecture, Research, Care and Health, København, Denmark, 26/04/2017.

The Architectural Question of Vandhalla – to Compensate or to Stimulate? / Grangaard, Sidse; Ryhl, Camilla.

ARCH17 Conference proceedings: 3rd international conference on architecture, research, care and health.. ed. / Nanet Mathiasen; Anne Kathrine Frandsen. Polyteknisk Boghandel og Forlag, 2017. p. 316-330.

Research output: Contribution to book/anthology/report/conference proceedingArticle in proceedingResearchpeer-review

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AB - In a Danish context, people with mobility impairments suffer from poor healthcompared with the rest of the population. They weigh more, exercise lessand participate less in the cultural and social activities of everyday life. However,persons with disabilities, who are active in sports, are significantlymore often employed, engaged in civic and voluntary activities and have ahigher educational level compared with other persons with disabilities. Inother words, participation in physical activities increases participation in otherfields of society and functions as a lever for individual health and wellbeing.Egmont, a Danish folk high school has already acknowledged the effect ofsport in its work on rehabilitation, habilitation, health and well-being. Egmontis open to everyone but a majority of the students are persons with physicaldisabilities. In 2013 the new sport centre Vandhalla, which offers numerousnew activities was opened. Using Vandhalla as a case, this article discusseshow universal design in architecture can support the process of habilitation.Traditionally, accessible design intends to compensate for disabilities, but atVandhalla the architecture stimulates rather than compensates. Hence theuniversal design of architecture inspires and supports activities as well asthe student’s abilities to be self-reliant. Furthermore it increases the sense ofjoy among the students which can be documented in ever-widening circles intheir perceived quality of life.Empirically, this paper is primarily based on a post-occupancy evaluation ofVandhalla. Interviews and walk-throughs were conducted with the winningteam, the client, the teachers and the students. Data from other researchprojects conducted by the authors are included as examples.The concept of ‘A Challenging Space’ is introduced and used as an analyticalframework.

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Grangaard S, Ryhl C. The Architectural Question of Vandhalla – to Compensate or to Stimulate? In Mathiasen N, Frandsen AK, editors, ARCH17 Conference proceedings: 3rd international conference on architecture, research, care and health.. Polyteknisk Boghandel og Forlag. 2017. p. 316-330