The Becoming and Changing of Parenthood: Immigrant and Refugee Parents’ Narratives of Learning Different Parenting Practices

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Abstract

In an age where parenting has become a central concern for education and policy makers, there is an increased effort to ensure ‘good’ parenting practices amongst immigrant and refugee parents. The article argues that there is an uprise of interventions aimed at teaching new parenting practices to these parents, building on deficit assumptions. These interventions are critiqued from a poststructuralist perspective arguing that they build on a narrow school-centric and normative understanding of good parenting. However, it is pointed out, that this critique does not provide a way forward that allows for immigrant and refugee parents to transcend marginalization. The article draws on an analysis of empirical material from a parent-intervention project in a social housing community with a high density of ethnic minority families. The analysis investigates the narratives of how parents learn to do parenting differently. Drawing on social practice theory in general and situated learning theory in particular, the article argues that rather than attempting to change the knowledge of parents, home-family-community relationships can and should be strengthened through situated changes of practice that open up for new ways of social interaction and allow for changes in parenting practices that are experienced as meaningful by the parents.
Original languageEnglish
Article number11
JournalPsychology & Society
Volume11
Issue number1
Pages (from-to)106-127
Number of pages21
ISSN2041-5893
Publication statusPublished - 2019

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title = "The Becoming and Changing of Parenthood: Immigrant and Refugee Parents’ Narratives of Learning Different Parenting Practices",
abstract = "In an age where parenting has become a central concern for education and policy makers, there is an increased effort to ensure ‘good’ parenting practices amongst immigrant and refugee parents. The article argues that there is an uprise of interventions aimed at teaching new parenting practices to these parents, building on deficit assumptions. These interventions are critiqued from a poststructuralist perspective arguing that they build on a narrow school-centric and normative understanding of good parenting. However, it is pointed out, that this critique does not provide a way forward that allows for immigrant and refugee parents to transcend marginalization. The article draws on an analysis of empirical material from a parent-intervention project in a social housing community with a high density of ethnic minority families. The analysis investigates the narratives of how parents learn to do parenting differently. Drawing on social practice theory in general and situated learning theory in particular, the article argues that rather than attempting to change the knowledge of parents, home-family-community relationships can and should be strengthened through situated changes of practice that open up for new ways of social interaction and allow for changes in parenting practices that are experienced as meaningful by the parents.",
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The Becoming and Changing of Parenthood : Immigrant and Refugee Parents’ Narratives of Learning Different Parenting Practices. / Matthiesen, Noomi Christine Linde.

In: Psychology & Society, Vol. 11, No. 1, 11, 2019, p. 106-127.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

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