The dark side of aeromobilities: Unplanned airport planning in Mexico City

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Abstract

Land-use conflicts, noise and health problems, local air pollution, decreased urban quality and affected liveability are considered amongst the core impacts and consequences associated with global airports, all of which have largely been individually documented. Through a case study of Mexico City International Airport, this article argues that a more integrated focus that brings such various issues and perspectives together is needed in order to widen the understanding of the existing relationship between socio-spatial and environmental effects, increased aeromobility, airport siting conflicts, airport urban surroundings and globalisation. The present study of Mexico City International Airport suggests that local players and airports are not just passively influenced by processes of globalisation and aeromobilities, but also that such processes disentangle a wide array of socio-spatial and environmental consequences that depend on ad hoc local contexts. Hence, the article follows the argument that a much stronger focus on the planning process of airports is needed at local and regional scales, while a larger debate regarding the regulation of increased global aviation ought to be raised in national and international contexts.
Original languageEnglish
JournalInternational Planning Studies
Volume19
Issue number2
Pages (from-to)132-153
Number of pages22
ISSN1469-9265
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014
EventCosmobilities Conference "Mobilities in Motion: New Approaches to Emergent and Future Mobilities" - Philadelphia, United States
Duration: 21 Mar 201123 Mar 2011

Conference

ConferenceCosmobilities Conference "Mobilities in Motion: New Approaches to Emergent and Future Mobilities"
CountryUnited States
CityPhiladelphia
Period21/03/201123/03/2011

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airport
Mexico
planning
globalization
land use conflict
air pollution
city
planning process
air traffic
environmental effect
atmospheric pollution
land use
regulation
health

Cite this

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The dark side of aeromobilities : Unplanned airport planning in Mexico City. / Lassen, Claus C.; Galland, Daniel.

In: International Planning Studies, Vol. 19, No. 2, 2014, p. 132-153.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

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