Abstract

The chapter takes its point of departure in a discussion of the relationship between music as an aesthetic gestalt and sound as physical matter revealing music's fundamental status as a virtual auditory phenomenon. This is partly carried out through a reflection on music's traditional acoustic semblance. But it is also a discussion about the experience of space that music provides through traditional analog sound production and the intensification of this experience that occurs in consequence of the introduction of modern digital production methods. It is the chapter's thesis that recorded music represents, and is experienced in, a space that is not there; music is essentially transitory and virtual and this is exemplified through an analysis of the instrumentation and production techniques of two songs from Suzanne Vega's 1992 album 99.9˚
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationHandbook of Virtuality
EditorsMark Grimshaw
Number of pages12
Place of PublicationUSA
PublisherOxford University Press
Publication dateDec 2013
Pages392-404
Article number24
Chapter4
ISBN (Print)978-0-19-982616-2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2013

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Music
Sound
Fundamental
Acoustics
Albums
Hearing
Recorded music
Song
Gestalt
Production Technique
Physical
Instrumentation
Aesthetics
Traditional music

Cite this

Knakkergaard, M. (2013). The Music That's Not There: -. In M. Grimshaw (Ed.), Handbook of Virtuality (pp. 392-404). [24] USA: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/oxfordhb/9780199826162.013.005
Knakkergaard, Martin. / The Music That's Not There : -. Handbook of Virtuality. editor / Mark Grimshaw. USA : Oxford University Press, 2013. pp. 392-404
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Knakkergaard, M 2013, The Music That's Not There: -. in M Grimshaw (ed.), Handbook of Virtuality., 24, Oxford University Press, USA, pp. 392-404. https://doi.org/10.1093/oxfordhb/9780199826162.013.005

The Music That's Not There : -. / Knakkergaard, Martin.

Handbook of Virtuality. ed. / Mark Grimshaw. USA : Oxford University Press, 2013. p. 392-404 24.

Research output: Contribution to book/anthology/report/conference proceedingBook chapterResearchpeer-review

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Knakkergaard M. The Music That's Not There: -. In Grimshaw M, editor, Handbook of Virtuality. USA: Oxford University Press. 2013. p. 392-404. 24 https://doi.org/10.1093/oxfordhb/9780199826162.013.005