The reachable 3-D workspace volume is a measure of payload and body-mass-index: A quasi-static kinetic assessment

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Abstract

An experimental protocol with five tasks is proposed for a low-cost empirical assessment of the reachable 3-D workspace (RWS), including both close-to-torso and far-from-torso regions. Ten participants repeated the protocol for four distinct hand payloads. The RWS expressed as a point cloud and its non-convex alpha-shape were obtained for each case. Moreover, individual strength surrogates for glenohumeral flexion and abduction, and elbow flexion were collected using a dynamometer. The RWS volume was statistically modelled using payload, body-mass-index and the strength surrogates as predictors. For increasing payload, a significant (r = −0.736,p < 0.001) decrease in RWS volume was found for distinct payload cases across all subjects. The only significant predictors found for the RWS volume were normalized payload (F = 73.740,p < 0.001) and body-mass-index (F = 11.008,p = 0.003). No significant interactions were found. The consequent regression model (F(2,27) = 41.11, p < 0.001, Radj^2 = 0.7345) explained around 73% of the variation in the data. The RWS volume is a function of payload and body-mass-index.
Original languageEnglish
JournalApplied Ergonomics
Volume75
Issue numberC
Pages (from-to)108-119
ISSN0003-6870
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019

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Dynamometers
Torso
Body Mass Index
Kinetics
Costs
abduction
Elbow
Hand
Costs and Cost Analysis
regression
costs
interaction

Cite this

@article{45356c03b35f4de497ac849f903c1901,
title = "The reachable 3-D workspace volume is a measure of payload and body-mass-index: A quasi-static kinetic assessment",
abstract = "An experimental protocol with five tasks is proposed for a low-cost empirical assessment of the reachable 3-D workspace (RWS), including both close-to-torso and far-from-torso regions. Ten participants repeated the protocol for four distinct hand payloads. The RWS expressed as a point cloud and its non-convex alpha-shape were obtained for each case. Moreover, individual strength surrogates for glenohumeral flexion and abduction, and elbow flexion were collected using a dynamometer. The RWS volume was statistically modelled using payload, body-mass-index and the strength surrogates as predictors. For increasing payload, a significant (r = −0.736,p < 0.001) decrease in RWS volume was found for distinct payload cases across all subjects. The only significant predictors found for the RWS volume were normalized payload (F = 73.740,p < 0.001) and body-mass-index (F = 11.008,p = 0.003). No significant interactions were found. The consequent regression model (F(2,27) = 41.11, p < 0.001, Radj^2 = 0.7345) explained around 73{\%} of the variation in the data. The RWS volume is a function of payload and body-mass-index.",
author = "Castro, {Miguel Nobre} and John Rasmussen and Shaoping Bai and Andersen, {Michael Skipper}",
year = "2019",
doi = "10.1016/j.apergo.2018.09.010",
language = "English",
volume = "75",
pages = "108--119",
journal = "Applied Ergonomics",
issn = "0003-6870",
publisher = "Pergamon Press",
number = "C",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The reachable 3-D workspace volume is a measure of payload and body-mass-index: A quasi-static kinetic assessment

AU - Castro, Miguel Nobre

AU - Rasmussen, John

AU - Bai, Shaoping

AU - Andersen, Michael Skipper

PY - 2019

Y1 - 2019

N2 - An experimental protocol with five tasks is proposed for a low-cost empirical assessment of the reachable 3-D workspace (RWS), including both close-to-torso and far-from-torso regions. Ten participants repeated the protocol for four distinct hand payloads. The RWS expressed as a point cloud and its non-convex alpha-shape were obtained for each case. Moreover, individual strength surrogates for glenohumeral flexion and abduction, and elbow flexion were collected using a dynamometer. The RWS volume was statistically modelled using payload, body-mass-index and the strength surrogates as predictors. For increasing payload, a significant (r = −0.736,p < 0.001) decrease in RWS volume was found for distinct payload cases across all subjects. The only significant predictors found for the RWS volume were normalized payload (F = 73.740,p < 0.001) and body-mass-index (F = 11.008,p = 0.003). No significant interactions were found. The consequent regression model (F(2,27) = 41.11, p < 0.001, Radj^2 = 0.7345) explained around 73% of the variation in the data. The RWS volume is a function of payload and body-mass-index.

AB - An experimental protocol with five tasks is proposed for a low-cost empirical assessment of the reachable 3-D workspace (RWS), including both close-to-torso and far-from-torso regions. Ten participants repeated the protocol for four distinct hand payloads. The RWS expressed as a point cloud and its non-convex alpha-shape were obtained for each case. Moreover, individual strength surrogates for glenohumeral flexion and abduction, and elbow flexion were collected using a dynamometer. The RWS volume was statistically modelled using payload, body-mass-index and the strength surrogates as predictors. For increasing payload, a significant (r = −0.736,p < 0.001) decrease in RWS volume was found for distinct payload cases across all subjects. The only significant predictors found for the RWS volume were normalized payload (F = 73.740,p < 0.001) and body-mass-index (F = 11.008,p = 0.003). No significant interactions were found. The consequent regression model (F(2,27) = 41.11, p < 0.001, Radj^2 = 0.7345) explained around 73% of the variation in the data. The RWS volume is a function of payload and body-mass-index.

U2 - 10.1016/j.apergo.2018.09.010

DO - 10.1016/j.apergo.2018.09.010

M3 - Journal article

VL - 75

SP - 108

EP - 119

JO - Applied Ergonomics

JF - Applied Ergonomics

SN - 0003-6870

IS - C

ER -