The Role of Collaborative Networks in Overcoming Adoption Challenges of 3D Printing

Peder Veng Søberg*, Atanu Chaudhuri, Helen Rogers, Kulwant S PAWAR

*Corresponding author

Research output: Contribution to book/anthology/report/conference proceedingArticle in proceedingResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Purpose: Limited research explores the role of different types of collaborative networks, i.e., cluster-based, academia, or industry-led in addressing challenges and barriers in adopting 3D printing. The literature on the adoption of new technologies focuses on the intra-organisational enablers and to a limited extent on the role of external partners. Hence, this paper explores the role of collaborative networks in overcoming adoption challenges of 3D printing.
Design: The exploratory interview and case study approach employed here identifies companies’ challenges in adopting 3D printing. The interview questionnaire caters to research gaps identified in the literature review and is used to conduct semi-structured interviews with firms adopting 3D printing. The research design includes interviews with three service providers and seven customer firms (three in Denmark and four in Germany) between January and May 2017.
The design also includes interviews with one Danish and two German 3D printing networks combined with public domain information (websites, etc.). Nexttech in Denmark is an industrial cluster, while ‘mobility goes additive’ in Germany is an industry-led consortium, with universities added as academic members. The University of Paderborn Direct Manufacturing Research Center (DMRC) is a university-led consortium that also has industry partners.
The research team recorded, analysed, and shared the interviews with the participants.
The theoretical lens in the paper includes co-opetition, technology dispersion and adoption theory, and ambidextrous network theory.
Findings: Networks provide solutions for challenges not addressed by individual service providers. The findings illustrate that networks serve as a platform to discuss and share best practice on challenges such as lack of 3D printing technology awareness in the procurement function, how to train strategic buyers on the technologies, and in developing a customised Total Cost of Ownership (TCO) analysis for 3D printing for their requirements. Networks also liaise with industry associations and regulatory agencies for creating industry-specific standards and addressing IPR-related issues. An academia-led network that allows industry partners to initiate research projects provides a balance of creativity network, transformation network and process network characteristics.
Value: This research clarifies the role and contributions of networks in overcoming challenges in the adoption of 3D printing from exploration to exploitation – an important issue largely neglected in the literature and highly relevant for industrial companies.
Practical implications: There is a clear need for organisations across the 3D printing spectrum to develop a collaborative platform to share challenges and develop solutions, which also facilitates the further development of the technologies. A group of companies can drive these, including both users of the technology, raw material and equipment suppliers, service providers and also educational institutions (e.g. ‘mobility goes additive’). Such networks can also be operated as an independent entity as an industrial cluster based organisation (e.g. Nexttech) or led by universities (e.g. the University of Paderborn DMRC), bringing in companies to test the latest developments and to train engineers and executives.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationSupply Chain Networks vs Platforms: Innovations, Challenges and Opportunities
EditorsKulwant S. Pawar, A. Potter, Helen Rogers, C. Glock
Number of pages8
PublisherCentre for Concurrent Enterprise, Nottingham University Business School
Publication date2019
Pages242-249
ISBN (Electronic)9780853583295
Publication statusPublished - 2019
Event24th International Symposium on Logistics (ISL 2019): Supply Chain Networks vs Platforms: Innovations, Challenges and Opportunities - Maritim Hotel, Würzburg, Germany
Duration: 14 Jul 201917 Jul 2019
http://www.isl21.org

Conference

Conference24th International Symposium on Logistics (ISL 2019)
LocationMaritim Hotel
CountryGermany
CityWürzburg
Period14/07/201917/07/2019
Internet address

Fingerprint

Collaborative networks
Industry
Service provider
Consortium
Denmark
Industrial cluster
Train
Germany
Research center
Manufacturing
Structured interview
Raw materials
Enablers
Suppliers
Web sites
Exploitation
Engineers
Network theory
Total cost of ownership
Buyers

Cite this

Søberg, P. V., Chaudhuri, A., Rogers, H., & PAWAR, K. S. (2019). The Role of Collaborative Networks in Overcoming Adoption Challenges of 3D Printing. In K. S. Pawar, A. Potter, H. Rogers, & C. Glock (Eds.), Supply Chain Networks vs Platforms: Innovations, Challenges and Opportunities (pp. 242-249). Centre for Concurrent Enterprise, Nottingham University Business School.
Søberg, Peder Veng ; Chaudhuri, Atanu ; Rogers, Helen ; PAWAR, Kulwant S . / The Role of Collaborative Networks in Overcoming Adoption Challenges of 3D Printing. Supply Chain Networks vs Platforms: Innovations, Challenges and Opportunities. editor / Kulwant S. Pawar ; A. Potter ; Helen Rogers ; C. Glock. Centre for Concurrent Enterprise, Nottingham University Business School, 2019. pp. 242-249
@inproceedings{7be8b62f0fbd420caf575d6b419cd283,
title = "The Role of Collaborative Networks in Overcoming Adoption Challenges of 3D Printing",
abstract = "Purpose: Limited research explores the role of different types of collaborative networks, i.e., cluster-based, academia, or industry-led in addressing challenges and barriers in adopting 3D printing. The literature on the adoption of new technologies focuses on the intra-organisational enablers and to a limited extent on the role of external partners. Hence, this paper explores the role of collaborative networks in overcoming adoption challenges of 3D printing.Design: The exploratory interview and case study approach employed here identifies companies’ challenges in adopting 3D printing. The interview questionnaire caters to research gaps identified in the literature review and is used to conduct semi-structured interviews with firms adopting 3D printing. The research design includes interviews with three service providers and seven customer firms (three in Denmark and four in Germany) between January and May 2017. The design also includes interviews with one Danish and two German 3D printing networks combined with public domain information (websites, etc.). Nexttech in Denmark is an industrial cluster, while ‘mobility goes additive’ in Germany is an industry-led consortium, with universities added as academic members. The University of Paderborn Direct Manufacturing Research Center (DMRC) is a university-led consortium that also has industry partners.The research team recorded, analysed, and shared the interviews with the participants. The theoretical lens in the paper includes co-opetition, technology dispersion and adoption theory, and ambidextrous network theory.Findings: Networks provide solutions for challenges not addressed by individual service providers. The findings illustrate that networks serve as a platform to discuss and share best practice on challenges such as lack of 3D printing technology awareness in the procurement function, how to train strategic buyers on the technologies, and in developing a customised Total Cost of Ownership (TCO) analysis for 3D printing for their requirements. Networks also liaise with industry associations and regulatory agencies for creating industry-specific standards and addressing IPR-related issues. An academia-led network that allows industry partners to initiate research projects provides a balance of creativity network, transformation network and process network characteristics. Value: This research clarifies the role and contributions of networks in overcoming challenges in the adoption of 3D printing from exploration to exploitation – an important issue largely neglected in the literature and highly relevant for industrial companies. Practical implications: There is a clear need for organisations across the 3D printing spectrum to develop a collaborative platform to share challenges and develop solutions, which also facilitates the further development of the technologies. A group of companies can drive these, including both users of the technology, raw material and equipment suppliers, service providers and also educational institutions (e.g. ‘mobility goes additive’). Such networks can also be operated as an independent entity as an industrial cluster based organisation (e.g. Nexttech) or led by universities (e.g. the University of Paderborn DMRC), bringing in companies to test the latest developments and to train engineers and executives.",
author = "S{\o}berg, {Peder Veng} and Atanu Chaudhuri and Helen Rogers and PAWAR, {Kulwant S}",
year = "2019",
language = "English",
pages = "242--249",
editor = "Pawar, {Kulwant S.} and A. Potter and Helen Rogers and C. Glock",
booktitle = "Supply Chain Networks vs Platforms: Innovations, Challenges and Opportunities",
publisher = "Centre for Concurrent Enterprise, Nottingham University Business School",

}

Søberg, PV, Chaudhuri, A, Rogers, H & PAWAR, KS 2019, The Role of Collaborative Networks in Overcoming Adoption Challenges of 3D Printing. in KS Pawar, A Potter, H Rogers & C Glock (eds), Supply Chain Networks vs Platforms: Innovations, Challenges and Opportunities. Centre for Concurrent Enterprise, Nottingham University Business School, pp. 242-249, 24th International Symposium on Logistics (ISL 2019), Würzburg, Germany, 14/07/2019.

The Role of Collaborative Networks in Overcoming Adoption Challenges of 3D Printing. / Søberg, Peder Veng; Chaudhuri, Atanu; Rogers, Helen; PAWAR, Kulwant S .

Supply Chain Networks vs Platforms: Innovations, Challenges and Opportunities. ed. / Kulwant S. Pawar; A. Potter; Helen Rogers; C. Glock. Centre for Concurrent Enterprise, Nottingham University Business School, 2019. p. 242-249.

Research output: Contribution to book/anthology/report/conference proceedingArticle in proceedingResearchpeer-review

TY - GEN

T1 - The Role of Collaborative Networks in Overcoming Adoption Challenges of 3D Printing

AU - Søberg, Peder Veng

AU - Chaudhuri, Atanu

AU - Rogers, Helen

AU - PAWAR, Kulwant S

PY - 2019

Y1 - 2019

N2 - Purpose: Limited research explores the role of different types of collaborative networks, i.e., cluster-based, academia, or industry-led in addressing challenges and barriers in adopting 3D printing. The literature on the adoption of new technologies focuses on the intra-organisational enablers and to a limited extent on the role of external partners. Hence, this paper explores the role of collaborative networks in overcoming adoption challenges of 3D printing.Design: The exploratory interview and case study approach employed here identifies companies’ challenges in adopting 3D printing. The interview questionnaire caters to research gaps identified in the literature review and is used to conduct semi-structured interviews with firms adopting 3D printing. The research design includes interviews with three service providers and seven customer firms (three in Denmark and four in Germany) between January and May 2017. The design also includes interviews with one Danish and two German 3D printing networks combined with public domain information (websites, etc.). Nexttech in Denmark is an industrial cluster, while ‘mobility goes additive’ in Germany is an industry-led consortium, with universities added as academic members. The University of Paderborn Direct Manufacturing Research Center (DMRC) is a university-led consortium that also has industry partners.The research team recorded, analysed, and shared the interviews with the participants. The theoretical lens in the paper includes co-opetition, technology dispersion and adoption theory, and ambidextrous network theory.Findings: Networks provide solutions for challenges not addressed by individual service providers. The findings illustrate that networks serve as a platform to discuss and share best practice on challenges such as lack of 3D printing technology awareness in the procurement function, how to train strategic buyers on the technologies, and in developing a customised Total Cost of Ownership (TCO) analysis for 3D printing for their requirements. Networks also liaise with industry associations and regulatory agencies for creating industry-specific standards and addressing IPR-related issues. An academia-led network that allows industry partners to initiate research projects provides a balance of creativity network, transformation network and process network characteristics. Value: This research clarifies the role and contributions of networks in overcoming challenges in the adoption of 3D printing from exploration to exploitation – an important issue largely neglected in the literature and highly relevant for industrial companies. Practical implications: There is a clear need for organisations across the 3D printing spectrum to develop a collaborative platform to share challenges and develop solutions, which also facilitates the further development of the technologies. A group of companies can drive these, including both users of the technology, raw material and equipment suppliers, service providers and also educational institutions (e.g. ‘mobility goes additive’). Such networks can also be operated as an independent entity as an industrial cluster based organisation (e.g. Nexttech) or led by universities (e.g. the University of Paderborn DMRC), bringing in companies to test the latest developments and to train engineers and executives.

AB - Purpose: Limited research explores the role of different types of collaborative networks, i.e., cluster-based, academia, or industry-led in addressing challenges and barriers in adopting 3D printing. The literature on the adoption of new technologies focuses on the intra-organisational enablers and to a limited extent on the role of external partners. Hence, this paper explores the role of collaborative networks in overcoming adoption challenges of 3D printing.Design: The exploratory interview and case study approach employed here identifies companies’ challenges in adopting 3D printing. The interview questionnaire caters to research gaps identified in the literature review and is used to conduct semi-structured interviews with firms adopting 3D printing. The research design includes interviews with three service providers and seven customer firms (three in Denmark and four in Germany) between January and May 2017. The design also includes interviews with one Danish and two German 3D printing networks combined with public domain information (websites, etc.). Nexttech in Denmark is an industrial cluster, while ‘mobility goes additive’ in Germany is an industry-led consortium, with universities added as academic members. The University of Paderborn Direct Manufacturing Research Center (DMRC) is a university-led consortium that also has industry partners.The research team recorded, analysed, and shared the interviews with the participants. The theoretical lens in the paper includes co-opetition, technology dispersion and adoption theory, and ambidextrous network theory.Findings: Networks provide solutions for challenges not addressed by individual service providers. The findings illustrate that networks serve as a platform to discuss and share best practice on challenges such as lack of 3D printing technology awareness in the procurement function, how to train strategic buyers on the technologies, and in developing a customised Total Cost of Ownership (TCO) analysis for 3D printing for their requirements. Networks also liaise with industry associations and regulatory agencies for creating industry-specific standards and addressing IPR-related issues. An academia-led network that allows industry partners to initiate research projects provides a balance of creativity network, transformation network and process network characteristics. Value: This research clarifies the role and contributions of networks in overcoming challenges in the adoption of 3D printing from exploration to exploitation – an important issue largely neglected in the literature and highly relevant for industrial companies. Practical implications: There is a clear need for organisations across the 3D printing spectrum to develop a collaborative platform to share challenges and develop solutions, which also facilitates the further development of the technologies. A group of companies can drive these, including both users of the technology, raw material and equipment suppliers, service providers and also educational institutions (e.g. ‘mobility goes additive’). Such networks can also be operated as an independent entity as an industrial cluster based organisation (e.g. Nexttech) or led by universities (e.g. the University of Paderborn DMRC), bringing in companies to test the latest developments and to train engineers and executives.

M3 - Article in proceeding

SP - 242

EP - 249

BT - Supply Chain Networks vs Platforms: Innovations, Challenges and Opportunities

A2 - Pawar, Kulwant S.

A2 - Potter, A.

A2 - Rogers, Helen

A2 - Glock, C.

PB - Centre for Concurrent Enterprise, Nottingham University Business School

ER -

Søberg PV, Chaudhuri A, Rogers H, PAWAR KS. The Role of Collaborative Networks in Overcoming Adoption Challenges of 3D Printing. In Pawar KS, Potter A, Rogers H, Glock C, editors, Supply Chain Networks vs Platforms: Innovations, Challenges and Opportunities. Centre for Concurrent Enterprise, Nottingham University Business School. 2019. p. 242-249